04 - Chapter Four Making Connections After reading this...

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Chapter Four Making Connections
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2 After reading this chapter, you should be able to: List the four components of all interface standards Discuss the basic operations of the USB and EIA-232F interface standards Cite the advantages of FireWire, SCSI, iSCSI, InfiniBand, and Fibre Channel interface standards Outline the characteristics of asynchronous, synchronous, and isochronous data link interfaces
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3 After reading this chapter, you should be able to (continued): Recognize the difference between half-duplex and full-duplex connections Identify the operating characteristics of terminal- to-mainframe connections and why they are unique compared to other types of computer connections
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4 Interfacing Connecting peripheral devices to a computer has, in the past, been a fairly challenging task Newer interfaces have made this task much easier Let’s examine the interface between a computer and a device This interface occurs primarily at the physical layer The connection to a peripheral is often called the interface The process of providing all the proper interconnections between a computer and a peripheral is called interfacing
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5 Characteristics of Interface Standards There are essentially two types of standards Official standards Created by standards-making organizations such as ITU (International Telecommunications Union), IEEE (Institute for Electrical and Electronics Engineers), EIA (Electronic Industries Association), ISO (International Organization for Standardization), and ANSI (American National Standards Institute) De facto standards Created by other groups that are not official standards but because of their widespread use, become “almost” standards
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6 Characteristics of Interface Standards (continued) There are four possible components to an interface standard: Electrical component Power and signaling Mechanical component Connectors, i.e., RJ45 for IEEE 802.30 Functional component • Serial, parallel, etc. Procedural component Soft code IEEE, ITU, etc. • Framing, media sharing, error correction, etc.
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7 Characteristics of Interface Standards (continued) Four components Electrical component – deals with voltages, line capacitance, and other electrical characteristics Mechanical component – deals with items such as the connector or plug description Functional component – describes the function of each pin or circuit that is used in a particular interface Procedural component – describes how the particular circuits are used to perform an operation
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8 Two Important Interface Standards In order to better understand the four components of an interface, let’s examine two popular interface standards EIA-232F – an older standard originally designed to connect a modem to a computer USB (Universal Serial Bus) – a newer standard that is much more powerful than EIA-232F
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9 EIA-232F Originally named RS-232 but has gone through
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This note was uploaded on 10/22/2011 for the course ITC 101 taught by Professor Cuibap during the Three '11 term at Charles Sturt University.

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04 - Chapter Four Making Connections After reading this...

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