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Summary_2_Foucault

Summary_2_Foucault - 1 Summary 2 Foucault Summary Along...

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1 Summary 2 – Foucault Summary Along with other social theorists, Michel Foucault believed that knowledge is always an essential form of power. One of the techniques/regulatory modes of power/knowledge that Foucault refered to was the Panopticon. He borrows the panoptic prison model from Englishman Jeremy Bentham whose model is a circular formation where cells are situated around a central tower which has the potential to see every prisoner. All cells face inward and prisoners are able to see only the tower, unable to communicate with or see other inmates. Most importantly, the prisoners can tell if they are being observed because the tower is designed with Venetian blinds, enabling guards to look out but no one to look in (Foucault pg. 393). Michael Foucault’s “panopticon” represents the way in which discipline and punishment work in society. The first stage of punishment is characterized by violence that is generally orchestrated among the general population by authority (Foucault 393). While the first phase of punishment is based on the centralization of powers within a specific social institution, the second phase witnesses the centralization of powers in surveillance and disciplinary practices. The previous
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