Philosophy study guide

Philosophy study guide - Philosophystudyguide 18:35...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Philosophy study guide 18:35 1. Define morality. Morality is a code of conduct binding all rational persons in order to prevent or limit harm  to oneself or to others. 2. Understanding the logical concepts: a. necessary and sufficient conditions b. conditional sentences A conditional sentence is a sentence of an if, then form. Antecedent – the statement that follows the if Consequent – the statement that follows the then p is a necessary condition for q if and only if p must be true/obtain in order for q to be  true/obtain p is a sufficient condition for q if and only if the truth/obtaining of p guarantees the  truth/obtaining of q truth conditions for the conditional P Q If p, then q True True True True False False False True True False False True c. only if sentences “only if” introduces a necessary condition, not a sufficient condition
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
they can also be converted to an if, then statement d. deductive vs. non-deductive deductive – the premises of an argument are intended by the author to guarantee the  truth of the conclusion inductive – the premises of an argument are not intended by the author to guarantee the  truth of the conclusion e. valid vs. invalid valid – if and only if it is impossible for the premises to be true and the conclusion false invalid – invalid if and only if the argument is not valid f. sound vs. unsound sound – an argument is sound if and only if it is: deductively valid and factually correct unsound – an argument is unsound if and only if the argument is not sound (factually  incorrect) g. deductively valid arguments modus tollens – if p, then q. not q. therefore, not p. modus ponens – if p, then q. p. therefore q. disjunctive syllogism – p or q. not q. therefore p (with premises 1 and 2) h. fallacies denying the antecedent – if p, then q. not p. therefore not q. affirming the consequent – if p, then q. q. therefore p.  i. non-deductive arguments enumerative inductive arguments – a conclusion based on evidence (at most are a  species of abductive arguments) abductive arguments – inferences to the best explanation 3. The two branches of normative ethics:
Background image of page 2
Normative ethics of behavior a. primary question – what makes an act morally right or morally wrong? b. primary project – to identify, formulate, and defend a criterion of moral rightness c. objects – the objects of moral appraisal are acts d. terms of moral appraisal – “morally right” and “morally wrong” e. criterion of moral rightness – a statement of the necessary and sufficient conditions  for a morally right act f. moral terms morally obligatory – if and only if it is morally wrong not to perform an act x
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 10/24/2011 for the course PHIL 164 taught by Professor Doviak during the Fall '07 term at UMass (Amherst).

Page1 / 10

Philosophy study guide - Philosophystudyguide 18:35...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online