Undergraduate-Catalog-2010-2011

Undergraduate-Catalog-2010-2011 - COLLEGE CALENDAR FALL...

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Unformatted text preview: COLLEGE CALENDAR FALL SEMESTER 2010 Course Catalog 2010-2011 CEL Fall Session A Begins ......................................................................... August 20 Jump Start (New Student Orientation) ................................................... August 27-30 Residence Halls Open - Returning Students .............................................. August 29 Transfer Student Orientation....................................................................... August 30 Classes Begin, Traditional Program ........................................................... August 31 Convocation ............................................................................................... August 31 Labor Day (no classes) ........................................................................... September 6 Late Registration Deadline, Traditional Program .................................... September 7 CEL Fall Session A Ends ........................................................................... October 14 CEL Fall Session B Begins ........................................................................ October 15 Registration Opens for Spring 2011 (Traditional & CEL) ........................... October 18 Mid-Term Examinations, Traditional Program ...................................... October 19-25 Homecoming ............................................................................................ November 6 Last Day for Class Withdrawal, Traditional Program ............................... November 8 Thanksgiving Break .......................................................................... November 22-26 Winter Banquet ...................................................................................... December 11 Classes End, Traditional Program ......................................................... December 13 Final Examinations, Traditional Program .......................................... December 14-17 CEL Fall Session B Ends ....................................................................... December 16 Dean’s Breakfast.................................................................................... December 18 Winter Commencement ......................................................................... December 18 Residence Halls Close ........................................................................... December 18 Grades Due, Traditional & CEL Programs ............................................. December 20 SPRING SEMESTER 2011 800 West Avon Road Rochester Hills, Michigan 48307 248.218.2000 • 800.521.6010 • www.rc.edu CEL Spring Session A Begins ..................................................................... January 7 Jump Start (New Student Orientation) ......................................................... January 8 Residence Halls Open ................................................................................. January 9 Classes Begin, Traditional Program .......................................................... January 10 Martin Luther King Day (no classes, Traditional Program) ........................ January 17 Late Registration Deadline (Traditional Program) ..................................... January 18 Mid-Term Examinations, Traditional Program ........................... February 28-March 4 CEL Spring Session A Ends ........................................................................... March 3 CEL Spring Session B Begins ........................................................................ March 4 Spring Break, Traditional Program (Residence Halls Closed) .................. March 7-11 Registration Opens for Summer 2011 (CEL) ................................................ March 14 Last Day for Class Withdrawal, Traditional Program .................................... March 21 Celebration.............................................................................................. March 25-26 Registration Opens for Summer & Fall 2011 (Traditional Program) ............. March 28 Academic Symposium (trad classes suspended April 19) ......................... April 18-19 Easter Holiday (no classes, Traditional Program)........................................... April 22 Page 2 Rochester College Classes End, Traditional Program ................................................................... April 25 Final Examinations, Traditional Program ................................................... April 26-29 CEL Spring Session B Ends ............................................................................ April 28 RC/CEL Summer Session A Begins ............................................................... April 29 Dean’s Breakfast ............................................................................................. April 30 Spring Commencement ................................................................................... April 30 Residence Halls Close .................................................................................... April 30 Grades Due, Traditional Program ..................................................................... May 3 TABLE OF CONTENTS SUMMER SEMESTER 2011 Graduate School of Religion .......................................... 7 RC/CEL Summer Session A Begins ............................................................... April 29 Maymester .................................................................................................... May 2-20 Memorial Day (no classes) .............................................................................. May 30 RC/CEL Summer Session A Ends ................................................................. June 23 RC/CEL Summer Session B Begins .............................................................. June 24 Independence Day (observed) ........................................................................... July 4 RC/CEL Summer Session B Ends .............................................................. August 18 The Campus ................................................................. 7 These dates are subject to change—please refer to the Rochester College website (www.rc.edu) for the latest event information. Financial Information .................................................. 27 College Calendar .......................................................... 2 Introduction to Rochester College ................................ 5 Heritage ........................................................................ 6 Degree Offerings ......................................................... 6 Student Life.................................................................11 Athletics ......................................................................13 Campus Ministry ......................................................... 13 Admissions .................................................................18 Financial Aid ............................................................... 35 Academics ..................................................................43 Degree Information (Traditional) .................................55 Center for Extended Learning (CEL) ........................127 Course Descriptions .................................................148 Personnel..................................................................197 Faculty ......................................................................204 Items of Record ........................................................213 Campus Map ............................................................ 216 Index .........................................................................218 Rochester College Page 3 Page 4 Rochester College INTRODUCTION TO ROCHESTER COLLEGE MISSION Rochester College cultivates academic excellence, principled character, servant leadership, and global awareness through a rigorous educational experience that integrates liberal arts and professional studies within an inclusive Christian heritage. Through our mission we affirm: • • • • • • • • A quality education stresses excellence and trains students to perform scholarly research, to think critically and creatively, and to be able to write and speak effectively. An educated person reveres God and is committed to truth and justice. An educated person is able to connect coherently the spiritual truths of God with the wisdom of humanity embodied in the arts and the sciences. A Christian education demonstrates that a vibrant faith compels a life of personal virtue and social responsibility. An educated person is not afraid to pursue truth through open investigation, and is able to assess and evaluate all truth claims through well-developed skills for critical thinking. An educated person possesses a lifelong desire to grow intellectually and spiritually. An educated person views a vocation as an opportunity for service and stewardship, rather than a passport to privilege. This community, its professors and administrators promote and incarnate all of the above affirmations within a nonsectarian Christian orientation. ACADEMIC VISION Rochester College is committed to academic excellence. The College is accredited by The Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association. Undergraduate concentrations in its Integrated Learning Model emphasize the importance of a liberal arts curriculum that models and teaches scholarly research, critical thinking, and effective communication skills in all fields of study. Specialized programs in education, nursing, business, psychology, and religious studies prepare our graduates both for productive careers in the marketplace and for advanced studies at graduate and professional schools. Rochester College offers a Master’s Degree in religious education (MRE). The use of cutting-edge educational technology allows the delivery of courses in a variety of on-site and distance settings. Rochester College cultivates the moral and spiritual development of its students. The college affirms this commitment to all students and in all programs through its curricular requirements for ethical and religious studies as well as through the commitment to hire faculty who are committed to an inclusive Christian orientation. In addition, the residential traditional program also operates within an inclusive Christian culture which promotes a holistic education through Integrated Learning models and unique opportunities for faculty-student mentoring. The smallRochester College Page 5 college residential environment provides opportunities to be involved in theater, athletics, music, student government, community cultural events, and a variety of other activities that contribute to the development of mental, ethical, and social skills. Although CEL students and persons enrolled in online courses from Rochester College do not experience such face-to-face events as chapel and other elements of campus life, all our students form a true community of scholarship, exchange of ideas, and respect for one another. Faculty members are available to students in situations outside of formal instruction contexts. Commuters and online students are always welcome on the residential campus and have access to its resources for research, student services, and camaraderie. HERITAGE In 1954, members of the Churches of Christ formed a Board of Trustees to establish a college in the north central United States. The new Board purchased land near rural Rochester, Michigan, and the first students arrived at North Central Christian College in 1959. Several years later, NCCC became Michigan Christian College. In 1997, the Board adopted the name Rochester College. That year, the Board reaffirmed the founders’ dedication to the task of leading students toward high academic achievement and the development of Christian ideals and character. Over the years, the campus of Rochester College has grown, and the college leaders have continued to develop and modify programs that meet the changing needs of our students. In a typical year, students arrive from more than a dozen states and about six different nations. Alumni are scattered in many places around the nation and the world. Since its inception, Rochester College has emphasized the importance of combining academic excellence with Christian ideals. While the College admits students of all races and religions and carefully explains varying worldviews in relevant courses, it employs only those professors and instructors who understand, model, and teach the Christian faith. Regardless of their discipline, faculty members routinely relate their subject matter to relevant principles and concepts of the Christian faith. DEGREE OFFERINGS (see page 56 for listing of majors) Rochester College offers the following accredited degrees: Associate of Arts (AA) Associate of Science (AS) Bachelor of Arts (BA) Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA) Bachelor of Science (BS) Master of Religious Education (MRE) Page 6 Rochester College GRADUATE SCHOOL OF RELIGION The Graduate School of Religion at Rochester College provides an excellent opportunity for men and women called to professional or lay ministry to pursue quality graduate education integrated with real life ministry that prepares students for a lifetime of faithful service and vibrant discipleship. The Master of Religious Education in Missional Leadership (MREML) is built upon a solid biblical, theological, and pastoral foundation, and is an ideal degree for anyone committed to leading within the church who is wrestling with the implications of a practical and living gospel and its relationship to and with dynamic cultures. The MREML is a 36-hour, cohort-based, full-time integrated program combining 24 online hours with 12 intensive onsite hours. While the majority of the coursework will be completed online, students will be required to travel to the RC campus or other designated sites two times per year to participate in one-week retreat seminars and intensive courses. For more information missional@rc.edu. about the program, contact the MRE office at THE CAMPUS Rochester College is located on 81 acres of suburban woodlands dotted with lakes and bordered by the Clinton River. It is part of Rochester Hills, an area that has developed into one of the most popular residential communities of southeastern Michigan. The area’s unique mixture of country charm and modern development has caused the city’s population to pass 70,000. Upscale shopping centers, theaters, and popular restaurants offer many options for recreation. There are numerous job and internship opportunities since over 50% of Fortune 500 corporations have operations in the area. The Greater Detroit Area also features museums and professional sports teams. Canada is less than an hour away, accessible by bridge or tunnel. ADMINISTRATIVE AND ACADEMIC FACILITIES Ennis and Nancy Ham Library In 2003 the library was named in honor of Ennis and Nancy Ham. The library offers electronic, print and audio-visual materials to all students and guests. Users have remote and on-campus access to indexing and full-text articles in over 60 electronic periodical databases. The library’s holdings can be found through the online catalog at www.rc.edu/lib. The library home page contains information on electronic resources, Internet resources, contact information, and library news. The librarians, support staff, and student library assistants work cooperatively to select, acquire, process, and organize the library’s materials. Librarians are available to help individual students in research in the library as well as assist faculty in classroom instruction. The library is open and staffed by librarians 75 hours per week. Computers, study carrels, study rooms, and lounge furniture create a comfortable and friendly environment in which students study, collaborate, and research. Interlibrary loan through a large library network allows students and faculty opportunities to borrow from other state and national libraries. Ham Library has membership in (ALA) American Library Association, (CCL) Christian College Librarians, (DALNET) Detroit Area Library Network, and (MLC) Michigan Library Consortium. Muirhead Center The Muirhead Center accommodates faculty, business, and financial aid offices. Richardson Center This is the newest addition to the campus. This building features the UtleyMcCauley student center, classrooms, a performing arts theatre, state-of-the-art science laboratories, and administrative offices. Warrior Center Once home to Rochester College’s science labs, this building now houses classrooms, an athletic training room, and administrative offices. RESIDENCE HALLS Associates Campus Center Campus Center is home to several classrooms, a 16-terminal computer lab with Internet access, Academic Services, Student Development, the Center for Extended Learning, Career Services, Online Learning, Information Technology, and faculty offices. Gallaher Center Gallaher Center houses the Campus Store and Admissions offices as well as the Alumni Music Center, which is located on the upper and lower levels of west Gallaher Center. Barbier Hall This hall is a two-story building located north of the Ferndale and Hoggatt Halls that houses up to 50 males, primarily freshmen. Rooms are carpeted, with furnishings including a bed, wardrobe, desk, chest of drawers, hutch, and chair for each resident. Each floor has a community bath with a first-floor laundry room. Phone hookups and cable are also available. Gatehouse The upper level houses the Counseling Center, while the lower level is used as a classroom and music ensemble rehearsal room. Ferndale Hall Constructed in 1997, this women’s residence hall offers suite-style living with private baths and Internet access in each room. All rooms are furnished with tile flooring, wardrobes, dressers, beds, desks, and chairs. Phone hookups and cable are also available. Residents may use Ferndale’s central kitchen and Dearborn Commons for laundry. Rochester College Page 8 Page 7 Rochester College Gatewood Hall This student residence hall offers suite-style living with private baths and Internet access in each room. All rooms are furnished with beds, wardrobes or closets, dressers, desks with hutches or shelves, and chairs. Phone hookups and cable are also available. Both men and women have access to a laundry room and kitchenette. Hoggatt Hall Constructed in 1997, this men’s residence hall offers suite-style living with private baths and Internet access in each room. All rooms are furnished with tile flooring, beds, wardrobes, dressers, desks, and chairs. Phone hookups and cable are also available. Residents who live in Hoggatt Hall are also permitted to use Hoggatt’s central kitchen and Dearborn Commons for laundry. Gymnasium Housing a regulation college basketball court, the gymnasium is the site of physical education classes and intramural athletics competition. Isom Atrium Home of the Solid Rock Cafe, the Atrium is a place where students and faculty can grab a cup of coffee or a bite to eat, sit and chat, connect to wireless Internet, or meet with friends. Utley Center The Utley center is home to the CHILL Center and ACE Lab. Located adjacent to Isom Atrium, Westside-Central Auditorium, and the Fletcher Center (cafeteria), the Utley Center is an ideal location for students to study, meet with groups, and improve their academic skills. Utley-McCauley Student Center The Utley-McCauley Student Center is a gathering place where students, whether residential or commuters, can meet. The student center houses three different sections. One section has tables and chairs for students to study, read, and relax. The middle section has a large screen TV with DVD/VCR capability, while the last section is a game area. Westside Central Auditorium Westside Central Auditorium is where Rochester College students meet for Chapel. The auditorium also hosts lectures, classes, theatre and music performances, and other special programs. Theatre The Theatre in the Richardson Center is used for drama productions, choral rehearsals and performances, the annual musical variety show, and many special events such as college- and community-sponsored seminars and conferences. Palmer Hall Available to students 25 years and older or married students, each room features carpeting, a private bath, walk-in closet, outside entrance, and hookups for phone, cable and Internet. Some rooms include a kitchenette. Palmer Hall is also the headquarters for the Housekeeping Department. Computer Labs Computer Labs are available in both the Associates Campus Center and the first floor of the Ham Library buildings. These labs are open for use when classes in these rooms are not in session. OTHER COLLEGE FACILITIES Dearborn Commons Proximity to men’s and women’s residence halls makes this a popular campus gathering place. The Commons features a TV lounge, computer terminals, and coed laundry facilities. Fletcher Center The campus cafeteria, the Fletcher Center, overlooks the campus lake and is equipped with wireless Internet. Food service for the college is provided by Chartwells. Rochester College Page 9 Page 10 Rochester College STUDENT LIFE Rochester College offers a wealth of co-curricular activities that appeal to a variety of interests. The intimate size of the student body makes it easy for anyone to participate in leadership or social activities. EVENTS Student Programming Each year, campus organizations and departments sponsor trips for faculty, staff, and students to area attractions such as museums, plays, and sporting events. Homecoming Hosted by Student Government and the Alumni Association each fall, the day is filled with activities for students and alumni, including an alumni men’s basketball game, intercollegiate basketball game, and the crowning of the Homecoming king and queen. Celebration A centerpiece on campus each spring, Celebration is led by a director and presented as a student collaboration and features our campus social clubs. The show is a kaleidoscope of music, singing, acting, and choreography. Academic Symposium The annual Academic Symposium celebrates the academic achievements and capstone projects of selected senior students. Diverse arrays of subjects are presented each year, ranging from executive simulations to scholarly papers to musical recitals. Chapel/Convocation Series Every full-time traditional student participates in Integrated Learning through the Rochester College Chapel/Convocation series (RCC). The RCC series offers a series of opportunities for students to participate in community assemblies, worship, small groups, and service initiatives, which are aimed at building Christian faith and community, affirming Christian values, and developing a holistic understanding of wellness. For more details, see “Chapel/Convocation Series” under “Academics.” STUDENT GROUPS Student Government Each year the student body selects a president, vice president of student activities, vice president of community life, vice president of public relations, and vice president of finance and fundraising. In the fall, senators select a senate chairperson to oversee the senate. These officers work to develop the quality of student-body life by planning activities and responding to student concerns. Each officer receives a stipend. Music Ensembles Each spring students may audition for one or more of the vocal, instrumental, or theatrical groups featured by Rochester College. Students who have an interest in singing may join the A Cappella Chorus, which performs at local, regional, and national events, or the Rochester Community Chorus, which performs frequently with the Rochester Symphony Orchestra. Students also have the opportunity to audition for Autumn, which performs contemporary Christian music for a variety of audiences. Students with instrumental skills may audition for the concert band or string ensemble. Theatre Students may audition for campus theatre productions or get involved backstage. The theatre department typically produces three or four plays per academic year, including a musical in the fall as part of Homecoming activities. Additionally, there are opportunities for students to learn to direct, stage manage, or design for the theatre. Students may also take a production on tour to local schools and/or perform for elementary or high school students on our campus. Finally, students may audition for Pied Pipers, an improvisational children’s theatre troupe that performs at local schools, churches, camps, and other community venues. Student Publications Students may join the staff of The Shield, RC’s student magazine, or the online version of The Shield to report on the pulse of Rochester College campus life. Working for these entities offers students the opportunity to use their creative talents in producing publications while also helping gain valuable media experience. Students from all majors are welcome to participate. Students can enroll in MED 1101, Print Journalism, or MED 1201, Digital Journalism, which are hands-on workshop classes devoted to publishing The Shield, or they can serve as volunteers. Scholarships are available to students who work as editors. Social Clubs Students may pledge a social club that engages in social activities, competes in intramural athletics, and performs community service projects. Social clubs also perform original dance/music numbers at the annual production, Celebration. Departmental Organizations and Honor Societies Qualified students may be invited to join Alpha Chi, a national honor society, Psi Chi, a national honor society for psychology students, or Alpha Psi Omega, a national honorary theatre fraternity. Residence Life A student staff of 12-16 members is selected each year to lead their peers in the residence halls. These students are responsible for building community by planning social, spiritual, and educational activities, and governing the halls. Each student gets a scholarship and/or weekly pay. Rochester College Page 11 Page 12 Rochester College ATHLETIC ACTIVITIES Intercollegiate Until 2010, Rochester College has competed in the United States Collegiate Athletic Association (USCAA). The College is currently in process of moving toward competition in the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA), pending a campus visit and official decision in early September, 2010. The College will still be affiliated with the USCAA. • Men’s sports include JV and varsity basketball, baseball, golf, and soccer. Women’s varsity sports include basketball, volleyball, softball, golf, and soccer. Rochester College boasts a tradition of athletic excellence, winning national titles in men’s basketball (1989, 1997, 2004, 2005), men’s cross-country (1989, 1990), men’s soccer (1996, 2006), women’s volleyball (1998, 1999), and men’s golf (2009). minority of “super-spiritual” persons; rather, all people are called to walk along with Jesus. God’s love and gospel are for all. Campus Ministry believes that Christian spirituality is communal. It is in community that the individual finds meaning and understanding of self, and true spirituality cannot negate that. After all, God calls a community of people, not simply a collection of persons. The Rochester College community is, in this sense, the most important factor to spiritual life on this campus. In this light, integration of spiritual life and the community is an essential part of ministry on this campus. Intramural Intramural teams compete in volleyball, basketball, flag football, whiffle ball, dodge ball, racquetball, and many other team and individual competitions. CAMPUS MINISTRY Campus Ministry exists to call for and empower the Rochester College community to a more faithful practice and reflection of Jesus Christ. Campus Ministry seeks to engage the Rochester College community by: • • • • Organizing and overseeing regularly scheduled Chapel services throughout the semester (for more details, see “Chapel/Convocation Series” under “Academics”) Fostering and growing community interaction among believing students, staff, and faculty Supporting and coordinating meaningful, practical, and encouraging programming on and off campus Creating involvement in service, missions, and leadership opportunities for residential, commuter, and online students Campus Ministry seeks to creatively and organically integrate spirituality into the daily life experience of the entire Rochester College community. This integration is not only natural but is also a necessary outgrowth of our convictions regarding the nature of Christian spirituality. • • • Campus Ministry believes that Christian spirituality is fundamentally real. Spirituality is not simply something awaiting us in the world to come; rather, it is something that happens here in the real world, which is designed in its totality to glorify God. Campus Ministry believes that Christian spirituality produces action. If one sees God’s call for the world to glorify him, one will be moved to act in such a way that gives witness to the kingdom’s reality in the world—to join God in his redemption of the world he loves. Campus Ministry believes that Christian spirituality is universal and inclusive. True spirituality is not to be reserved for some exclusive Rochester College Page 13 The richness of the Christian faith is not best expressed as an intellectual knowledge of certain concepts and prescripts; rather, faith should inform, transform, and empower daily living. It should be the practice of a daily walk of a life that values Christ-likeness, service, integrity, and community. Campus Ministry is committed to a spirituality that embraces the wholeness of individuals and communities and the world around them. Understanding the difference between a church and a college, Campus Ministry will seek to help each student grasp that part of being a well-rounded, well-educated, and well-equipped person is to have asked and wrestled with the questions of spirituality and faith. We seek to transform our students and our community by incorporating the challenging, dynamic, vivifying person of Jesus into every aspect of our lives. The Spiritual Life theme for the 2010-11 is “Let Justice Roll Down.” “But let justice roll down like waters, and righteousness like an ever-flowing stream” (Amos 5:24). COMMUNICATION METHODS Rochester College may communicate with students via several methods, including (but not limited to) U.S. Mail, phone, fax, or e-mail. It is important to inform the college whenever a change is made to the student’s contact information. An official RC e-mail address is issued to each student at the time he or she is admitted to RC. This official RC e-mail address takes the form of a person’s first initial and last name, followed by “@rc.edu” (e.g., jcollege@rc.edu). Page 14 Rochester College Students are responsible for activating their RC e-mail account; this may be accomplished on the student portal at https://my.rc.edu/student/login.asp. Students must check e-mail regularly in order to read important messages and notifications. Certain communications may be time-sensitive. Failure to read official RC communications sent to the student’s official RC e-mail address does not absolve the student from knowing and complying with the content of those communications. nonetheless expected to demonstrate responsibility as well as character through honorable adherence to the policies. All students are expected to observe common courtesy and cooperation with others in the Rochester College student body. Use of e-mail for official communications with students will comply with other applicable RC policies and business practices. SNOW DAYS AND CLASS CANCELLATIONS The following are Rochester College's procedures for announcing a closure of the college and cancellation of classes in the event of severe weather. The administration will not issue a weather closure unless it is a truly severe weather event. We live in Michigan and subsequently we must accept that inclement weather happens frequently. We encourage all students who travel to the campus to use caution, allot extra travel time if necessary, and arrive safely regardless of the conditions. The following procedures will be implemented in the case of a severe weather event that results in a campus closure: 1. 2. 3. It will be determined which classes the cancellation applies to; traditional day-time classes only, CEL evening classes only, or both. Decisions about traditional day-time classes are typically made before 7:00 a.m. and decisions about CEL evening classes are typically made after 3:00 p.m. of the afternoon of the weather event. DO NOT assume that evening classes are canceled just because traditional day-time classes are canceled. Note: A weather cancellation on one campus DOES NOT necessarily mean that classes at all RC sites are canceled. Classes at the Macomb and Mott University Centers and Specs Howard School will be canceled ONLY if the host site/institution closes. Local media will be notified (WWJ 950 Radio; WXYZ Channel 7; WDIV Channel 4). An announcement will also be posted on the WWJ website: www.schoolclosed.com. An announcement will be posted on warriornet.rc.edu (student login required) and to RC class cancellation voice line (248-218-2003). SOCIAL REGULATIONS Rochester College is committed to building a campus culture that harmonizes with Christian values. Students are personally responsible for campus and community conduct. Rochester College encourages good character; therefore, immodest or inappropriate attire, dishonesty, profanity, sexual promiscuity, gambling, property abuse, on-campus or underage use or possession of alcoholic beverages, illegal drugs, or tobacco is not permitted. The Student Handbook, available at student orientation or from the Student Development Office, describes additional policies. Violation of college regulations or civil law may lead to dismissal. Enrollment at Rochester College serves as the student’s agreement to abide by the college’s standards of conduct. Students may not agree with all college standards but are Rochester College Page 15 RESIDENCE HALLS Rochester College provides room and board for its single traditional-age students (generally 18 – 24) who are enrolled and taking at least nine credit hours from a traditional undergraduate program. Residential space is limited and policies promote a close-knit campus culture that features social and spiritual aspects that are structured toward the targeted residential population. Housing for married or older adult learners (25+) may be available on a student-by-student basis but is not guaranteed. Boarding students in traditional halls and in apartments without a kitchenette must obtain cafeteria meal services. Each resident is financially responsible for room damages. Off-campus housing is allowed for students who are at least 21 years old and of junior status, or for married students, or for students who live with relatives over the age of 25. Institutional Aid may not be available to students who live off-campus. Exceptions may be considered at the end of the academic year in which the student turns 23 years old or when residence halls are at capacity. PSYCHOLOGY and COUNSELING CLINIC The role of the Psychology and Counseling Clinic on campus is to help meet the psychological and developmental needs of young adults who face major life transitions and adjustments while they are in college. Psychological services can provide coping mechanisms to help students succeed both academically and personally. Professional psychological counseling services provided to Rochester College students through the clinic include individual psychotherapy, marital and family psychotherapy, and psychological assessments to assist in identifying the individual challenges of students. The current professional staff includes two Clinical Psychologists and a Psychotherapist who are licensed by the State of Michigan in their professions. Page 16 Rochester College The Psychology and Counseling Clinic is located in the Gatehouse on the far west end of campus. The Rochester College Department of Behavioral Sciences oversees the clinic. Appointments can be made by calling Dr. Gordon MacKinnon, Director of the Psychology and Counseling Clinic at 248.218.2122. HEALTH INSURANCE AND SERVICES All residential students and full-time commuter students are required to provide proof of health insurance coverage and sign an exemption form declining the school’s policy because of such coverage. Students with no coverage or failure to provide proof of coverage must purchase a non-refundable policy. The health insurance waiver deadline is September 4, 2010 for fall 2010 and January 13, 2011 for spring 2011. Brochures outlining coverage details are available in the Business Office. Specific coverage questions should be addressed to the insurance provider directly at 800.431.1270. See the student accounts manager for more details. ADMISSIONS A benefit of attending Rochester College is its commitment to focus on the whole person, spiritually, academically, and socially. Future students should consider RC’s vigorous education and Christian environment as a means to achieve their goals and to be challenged in those areas. ADMISSIONS PROCEDURE Complete each of the following steps to apply for the traditional undergraduate program at Rochester College. For those who seek financial aid, it is important to complete these steps as early as possible. See the Center for Extended Learning section for enrollment procedures for CEL programs (page 129). 1. Nearby Henry Ford and Mercy Care Medical Centers prescribe medication and offer treatment for minor ailments (a complete list of health services is available in the student handbook). Emergency care is available at nearby Crittenton Hospital. Students may choose a local physician at their own discretion, and are obligated to pay for services and medication. CAREER SERVICES 2. The Career Services office is here to assist students at every stage of college life in relating personal interest, skills, and values to academic pursuits and career goals. As part of the Freshmen Year Experience program, all freshmen go through an orientation with Career Services. They are then given the tools to begin a career planning process that will take them through graduation and into either job search assistance or graduate school. Another resource for freshmen is guidance in selecting a major and learning about its career options. For students further along in college who may be trying to make their goals a reality, Career Services can help refine job search skills and put students in touch with the employment community, as well as assist students in locating part-time and full-time employment by maintaining a job database available on the college web site. Located in the Campus Center, the Career Services office maintains a career and job search library, administers career assessments, and provides individual career counseling as well as resume and interview assistance. 3. 4. Rochester College Page 17 Page 18 Submit a completed application for undergraduate admission to the Admissions Office. A non-refundable application fee of $35 ($100 USD for international students) is required when submitting a paper application. The application fee for domestic applicants is waived if the application for admission is submitted online. Application forms may be downloaded or submitted online at www.rc.edu/apply. Applications are also available from the Admissions Office upon request. Request delivery of your official transcripts to Rochester College from your high school guidance counselor or registrar. For students who have completed some college coursework and desire to transfer to Rochester College, official college transcripts must be submitted. A Transcript Request Form is available for download online at www.rc.edu/apply or in the application packet. Transcripts are required before an admissions decision will be made. All students graduating from high school must make arrangements to have a final transcript sent to Rochester College after graduation. Students who have completed college work must submit a final high school transcript and an official college transcript. GED graduates must submit an official copy of their GED scores to the Admissions Office. Students who are entering college for the first time and students who are transferring less than 15 semester hours from an accredited college or university are required to submit ACT or SAT scores to Rochester College. Scores noted on a high school transcript are acceptable. You may request your scores be submitted to Rochester College at these websites: www.actstudent.org (ACT) and www.collegeboard.com (SAT). Rochester College’s ACT code is 2072 and our SAT code is 1516. Campus residence is required of all students (unless married) who are under the age of 21 and junior status, or who are not living with a parent or relative over the age of 25. Students planning to live on campus must submit a Room Reservation form. This form can be downloaded from our website at www.rc.edu/apply or is part of our application packet. Housing assignments are made on a first-come, first-served basis. The room security and key deposits are due at time of registration. Submission of the Room Reservation form does not commit the student to living on campus; it only indicates an interest to do so. Rochester College HOME-SCHOOLED STUDENTS Rochester College recognizes and values the educational experience of homeschooled students. These students are welcomed and encouraged to apply for admission through the same process as any other student. The admissions criteria for home-schooled students are the same as a student who graduates from a traditional high school. The following information will be required from home-schooled students who wish to take courses at Rochester College: • Verification of home-school status and course work • Home-schooled, Dual Enrollment, or Guest Student Application grade of C- (1.7 on a four-point scale) or higher at regionally accredited colleges, schools accredited by The Association of Biblical Higher Education, or a select list of voluntarily unaccredited institutions (standards within individual majors may be higher). Up to 30 hours of lower division credit might also be transferred from other unaccredited programs; these are subject to validation by the relevant academic department(s) at Rochester College and by a probationary semester of full-time, C (2.0 on a four-point scale) or higher coursework. Acceptance of transfer course credit is subject to a transcript evaluation by Rochester College. Students whose prior academic experience includes coursework completed outside the United States or Canada must provide a transcript evaluation from a third-party evaluation company. For more information about evaluation of international transcripts, see International Students – Transferring Credits on page 23. Credit received on a basis other than the semester unit will be converted to semester hours. Transfer credit counts as upper-level credit only if the course has junior or senior status at the institution where it was taken. All work transferred from a junior college is considered lower-level credit except for 300-level courses taken in the third year of an approved third-year program. Transfer credit may apply toward a traditional degree, but is limited to no more than 34 semester hours toward the Associate’s degree and 98 hours toward the Bachelor’s degree. At least 50% of a student’s major core requirements must be earned at Rochester College. Transfer credit is not applied to Rochester College GPA. RESIDENCE REQUIREMENT Campus residence is required of all traditional students (unless married) who are under the age of 21 and junior status. Students who are living with a parent or with a relative over the age of 25 are exempt from this policy. FIRST TIME IN COLLEGE (FTIAC) High school graduates with less than 15 semester hours of college credit are required to meet the following criteria for unconditional admission to Rochester College: a minimum 2.25 cumulative high school GPA and a minimum ACT composite score of 18 (or a minimum SAT total of 880). Additional consideration may be given to component scores on each test. Students who did not graduate from high school may be admitted unconditionally if they earned a minimum GED score of 550 and meet the minimum ACT or SAT score. Home schooled students are required to meet the minimum ACT or SAT score and must have completed their home school requirements or have attained the minimum GED score. TRANSFER STUDENT Transfer students from other colleges or universities must provide official transcripts from each institution and complete the steps listed under Admissions Procedure on page18. ACT or SAT scores are not required of students who have earned 15 or more college semester hours. Transfer students must have earned a minimum 2.25 cumulative GPA in their college course work for admission to Rochester College. Rochester College grants credit for courses completed with a Rochester College Page 19 Under the MACRAO Transfer Agreement, transferees from participating Michigan colleges or universities usually meet all general education requirements for the Bachelor’s degree at Rochester College, except the Christian Values Requirement and general education courses or prerequisites required for a major. However, if the transfer credits do not include a literature course, information literacy course (INF 1011), or math course equal to MAT 1103 Intermediate Algebra (or higher), the student must complete these courses before a degree will be awarded. Transcripts must specifically confirm that all MACRAO requirements are met. For more information, contact the Academic Services Office. Transferees who hold the Bachelor’s degree from another regionally accredited college or university are exempt from all general education requirements, except the Christian Values Requirement and any specific general education courses or prerequisites required for a major. EARLY ADMISSION High school students are eligible for early admission as full-time students at Rochester College based on the following criteria: completion of junior year of high school with a CGPA of 3.00 or higher, and an ACT score of 21 or higher. Early admission students must make arrangements with their school district to earn their high school diploma, or earn a satisfactory score on the General Equivalency Diploma (GED). The high school diploma or GED must be earned by the end of the second semester of enrollment at Rochester College. Students who have not earned a high school diploma or GED are not eligible for federal financial aid. Page 20 Rochester College DUAL ENROLLMENT INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS High school students (sophomore to senior) may dual-enroll at Rochester College and may enroll in lower division general education courses or, with permission of the appropriate department chair, other lower division core courses. This provides a great opportunity to experience the college environment and earn college credits while completing the high school diploma. Students should consult their high school counselor to determine how college credits may apply toward their high school diploma requirements. Students who dual-enroll are granted a fifty percent (50%) tuition discount, are not required to pay the student support fee, and are not eligible for financial aid. This tuition discount is available for up to three semesters prior to the time the student completes the requirements for the high school diploma. Dual-enrolled students may enroll for no more than 11 credit hours of course work per semester. Students who receive their secondary education outside of the United States must demonstrate their ability to perform college level work in the US. Required Items 1. Submit the Admissions Application and $100.00 application fee (U.S. currency). You can complete the application online at rc.edu/apply. 2. Submit official original transcripts showing that you have successfully completed 12 years of education (US high school equivalent). These credentials must display your ability to perform college level work in the United States. These transcripts must be in English. If not in English, your official transcripts must be evaluated and certified by a third party evaluation company such as World Education Services, Inc. or Educational Credentials Evaluators, Inc. Photocopies are not acceptable. If you have completed college coursework and wish to transfer those credits to RC, you must also submit original transcripts from the college or university that you attended. See the section “Transferring Credits” below for information on how to have transcripts evaluated and certified. 3. All student visa applicants born in a country whose native language* is not English must submit "official test documentation" of English language proficiency by submitting one of the following: RE-ENROLLMENT To return to Rochester College after an absence of one or more semesters, students must notify the Academic Services Office. Students suspended or dismissed for academic reasons must appeal to the Academic Life Committee for re-admittance. Students dismissed or suspended for social reasons must request re-enrollment through the Student Development Office. Students who are readmitted following Academic Suspension or dismissal may be required to receive tutoring and related learning resources through the Academic Center for Excellence. Students who reenroll after an absence of 12 months or more may only be re-admitted under the latest degree plan offered for the degree and major being pursued. ! Student Visa Applicants residing outside of the United States and Canada will need to take the "Test of English as a Foreign Language" (TOEFL) and score at least: 520 on the paper based 190 on the computer based 68 on the internet based You must also have official results mailed from TOEFL directly to Rochester College. The TOEFL website (www.toefl.org) has information on registration and testing locations. Student Visa applicants already residing in the United States or in Canada should take the Michigan English Language Assessment Battery (MELAB) and score 70. Successfully complete Level 112 at an ELS Language Center in the US or one of eighteen other countries. The ELS Language Center website (www.els.com ) has information on registration and center locations. o o o o ! ! *A native language is a language that is acquired naturally during childhood and is usually spoken at home, as opposed to a language that is learned later in life, for example, as part of a person's formal education. All students who were educated outside the U.S. or Canada will automatically enter Rochester College on Academic Alert. This may limit the number of hours you are permitted to enroll in. Once Rochester College receives all required items Rochester College Page 21 Page 22 Rochester College mentioned above, we will evaluate your application and make an admission decision. If you are accepted, we will send you an official letter of acceptance. Transferring Credit College coursework from institutions not in the U.S. or Canada may be accepted for transfer credits. Coursework should be evaluated by a third party evaluation company such as World Education Services, Inc. or Educational Credentials Evaluators, Inc. World Education Services, Inc. (WES) P.O. Box 11623 Chicago, IL 60611-0623 USA Phone Number: 312-222-0882 Fax Number: 312-222-1217 Email: midwest@wes.org website: www.wes.org Educational Credentials Evaluators, Inc. P O Box 9297 Milwaukee WI 53202E USA Phone Number: 414-289-3400 Fax Number: 414-289-3411 Email: eval@ece.org website: www.ece.org In order to receive full credit; select the Course-by-Course type of evaluation. For this service, there is a fee payable to the evaluating company. Rush services are also available for an additional fee. Verification of Financial Resources and Student Account Payment Next, you must take steps to receive your I-20 and legal non-immigrant student status (F-1) by verifying your ability to pay for your education at Rochester College. The details of the cost of attendance at Rochester College, financial documentation required, and tuition payment schedule are contained in the International Student Statement of Finances which can be obtained from the Admissions Office. Once your financial security has been established, and the deposit is received by the Admissions Office, we will issue an I-20 to you. Financial Aid for International Students No state or federal aid is available to international students. International students are eligible to receive institutional scholarships for athletics and academics as well as other tuition discounts from Rochester College. Academic scholarships for international students are very limited due to the lack of equivalent measure for academic ability. Most institutional scholarships are based upon the results of one of two standardized tests used in the U.S. called the ACT or SAT and high school grade point average. Since international students do not automatically take these tests we do not require either for admission. However, if you decide to take either the ACT or SAT and have the scores sent to Rochester College you will be considered for academic scholarships. Information on the ACT or SAT and the nearest testing center can be found at www.act.org or www.collegeboard.com. No other standardized academic test will be accepted for consideration. Institutional scholarships and tuition discounts are awarded by the Admissions Department and are based on the applicant’s academic credentials and need. Immigration Procedures When you have been accepted into Rochester College, and any required financial statement or deposit has been received, the college will issue an I-20. The I-20 is a Certificate of Eligibility for Nonimmigrant (F-1) Students that is used to show reason for entry into the United States and in effect an invitation to attend school. When you have received the I-20 from Rochester College you must make an appointment at the US Embassy or Consulate closest to you to apply for an F-1 student visa. It is important to understand that the nature of an F-1 student visa assumes that you will return to your home country upon completion of studies and any authorized practical training. Each country is different in how they process student visas. It may be possible to make an appointment prior to receiving the I-20 as long as you have it in your possession at the time of the appointment. Please contact the embassy or consulate nearest you for specific details. Also note that in many countries it takes several attempts to receive an F-1 student visa so be prepared to try again if your application is initially denied. When you have been granted an F-1 student visa by the Embassy or Consulate, please contact us to confirm when you will be starting school and if you need assistance with travel plans to Michigan. On campus work is authorized under the F-1 visa for a maximum of 20 hours per week while school is in session and full time when school is out of session if a position is available. Off campus employment is generally not available to F-1 students except through application to the Immigration and Naturalization Service. Rochester College Page 23 Page 24 Rochester College GUEST STUDENTS College will continue to enhance the laptop program as the technology becomes more tailored for faculty and student interaction. A student is classified as a guest student if: • The student is enrolled at another college or university, • The student is not seeking a degree from Rochester College • The student is auditing a course Guest students must pay normal tuition and course fees or the audit fee and are not eligible for institutional or financial aid. Those who are students at another college or university must fill out a Michigan Uniform Undergraduate Guest Application. Those who are not students at another college or university must fill out a Guest Student Application (traditional or CEL) and select “Non Degree Seeking” for program or major. There is no application fee for guest students. Guest students should be aware of the following: • • • • Guest students attending another institution are responsible to ensure that they have successfully completed the pre-requisites to any course they are taking, if applicable. Guest students who are not attending another institution must produce evidence that they have completed prerequisites to any course they are taking, if applicable. Guest students who attend another college or university must request that grades and credits be sent to their home college or university via a normal transcript request. Transferability of courses should be predetermined by the student with his or her home institution. Guest students, who wish to take more than six hours in a semester, decide to begin working toward fulfillment of a Rochester College degree plan, or have accumulated 12 or more hours as a guest student must apply for admission to be enrolled as a regular student if they wish to continue taking additional Rochester College course work. Guest students may appeal these restrictions in writing to the Academic Dean. Guest students are subject to the Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy with the exception that if their cumulative grade point average falls below a 2.0 and they are placed on academic suspension they will not be eligible to take any further course work at Rochester College. Academically suspended guest students may submit a written appeal letter to the Academic Life Committee requesting to be permitted to take additional course work. The MacBook is the student’s laptop. The warranty is in the student’s name, and it will not need to be returned after graduation. Each student will be required to sign a laptop program agreement. If the student remains enrolled full-time at Rochester College for at least 6 full semesters, (excluding summer semesters) no charge will be made for the laptop. If the student leaves before 6 full semesters the student will pay a prorated charge for the MacBook. The specifications are as follows: • • • • • • • • 13” white MacBook Mac OS X Snow Leopard 2.4 GHz Intel Core 2 Duo 2 GB Memory 250 GB Hard drive Super Drive 3 year AppleCare Protection Plan Microsoft Office 2008 for Mac COMPUTERS Rochester College was the first college in the state of Michigan to offer all new incoming freshmen a state-of-the-art Apple MacBook absolutely free. Transfer students who enter Rochester College with less than 30 semester hours will also be eligible to receive a free MacBook. It is one of the goals of Rochester College to ensure that students learn to work with the latest technology. The College continues to implement educational technology that is on par with the more progressive colleges in the country. The campus-wide wireless environment creates possibilities for laptop use in the classroom, library, residence halls, and grounds—virtually anywhere. Rochester Rochester College Page 25 Page 26 Rochester College FINANCIAL INFORMATION Private Music Lesson Fee (all levels, per credit hour) ......................................... $400 SMG 4253 .............................................................................................................. $30 Rochester College strives to limit its costs and to provide generous financial aid for each eligible student. Tuition only covers about 70% of the overall educational services provided at the College; the balance is provided by other sources of income. RESIDENTIAL FEES AND DEPOSITS BASIC EXPENSES The following charges are for traditional students. See page 135 for CEL-specific charges. Basic expenses for a full-time student for the 2010-2011 year: Tuition Traditional Program 1 semester 2 semesters 8,212 $16,424 Block rate (12-18 hours) Hourly rate (under 12 or over 18 hours) $533 per hour Tuition – Graduate Program – see Graduate Catalog Tuition – Center for Extended Learning - see page 135 Student Support Fees (Traditional) 1 Boarding Student Commuting Student (full time 12 hours or more) Commuting Student (part time 5-11 hours) 1 semester 2 semesters $816 $464 $260 $1,632 $928 $520 1 Covers admission evaluation, academic advising, library services, student activities, telecommunication service, use of the campus computer network, security and parking, intramural athletics, and campus newspaper. Full-time students receive a yearbook. Full-time residential students receive a membership to Lifetime Fitness. SCHEDULE OF CHARGES Traditional Program, Tuition and Special Fees (refundable) Full-time Block (per semester, 12-18 hours) .................................................... $8,212 Outside Block (per semester hour over 18 or under 12) ..................................... $533 RN-BSN Tuition (per semester hour) .................................................................. $468 Summer Session (per semester hour) ................................................................ $379 Audit Fee (per hour, Traditional or CEL) ............................................................... $45 Course Fees (refundable, charged per course unless otherwise noted) All science lab courses, ENG 4203 ....................................................................... $45 ART 1413, 1423, 2443 .......................................................................................... $90 BIO 4603, ENG 4603, HIS 4503, 4603, MAT 4503, 4603, MUE 4423, 4433, NSC 4503, RDG 4503 ......................................................... $75 BUS 4823 .............................................................................................................. $25 EDU 2201, 2241, 3221, HIS 3603, MUS 2403, PSY 3313 .................................... $50 EDU 2303 .............................................................................................................. $60 EDU 3271, 4728, 4828 ........................................................................................ $135 MUS 1100, 1101 .................................................................................. $100 per year PED courses ....................................................................................................various PHI 3923 ............................................................................................................... $80 Rochester College Page 27 Housing and Meal Plans Room Options Ferndale, Hoggatt, Barbier or Gatewood ...................................................... $1597 Board Options Option A: 19 meals/week ($100 on swipe card) ........................................... $1426 Option B: 10 meals/week1 ............................................................................ $1056 Studio Apartment Housing2 (as available, first year) Back Units (per month) ................................................................................... $335 Front Units (with kitchenette, per month) ........................................................ $390 Summer Session Room Rates (weekly) ................................................................ $75 Room Security Deposit (any residential location) ................................................ $170 Mailbox Key Deposit ............................................................................................... $5 Private Room Fee (nonrefundable, as available, per semester) ......................... $462 1 Option B meal plan is only available to students living in Palmer, co-op students, students who are doing internships, and student teaching, and commuters. 2 To ease transition into the local housing market, student housing is provided, as space is available, for married students and traditional students over the age of 25 without children. Incoming students have priority over continuing students. If space continues to be available for a consecutive year, a rental arrangement may be continued at an additional $50/month. Other Charges and Fees (nonrefundable) CLEP & DANTES Administrative Fee .................................................................... $35 CLEP & DANTES Testing Fee (per examination).................................................. $77 DANTES Speech Testing Fee (per examination) ................................................ $110 CLEP and DANTES Credit Recording Fee (per credit hour) ................................. $25 Course Change Fee (per change form) ................................................................. $25 Graduation Application fee - Bachelor’s or Master’s degree ............................... $125 Graduation Application fee - Associate’s degree .............................................. $50 Health Insurance (minimal secondary coverage, per year) ................................. $471 Late Registration Fee (returning students) ............................................................ $35 Late Payment Fee.................................................................................................. $35 Lifetime Fitness (Commuters, per semester – price subject to change) .............. $225 Lock Replacement Fee .......................................................................................... $75 New Student Orientation Fee (Jumpstart or Transfer) ......................................... $175 Online Course Fee ................................................................................................. $30 Payment Plan Fee (per semester) ......................................................................... $60 Returned Check Fee (NSF, per check).................................................................. $35 Room Change Fee (per room change) .................................................................. $60 Room Reservation Fee .......................................................................................... $25 Strong Interest Inventory........................................................................................ $15 Student Identification Card Replacement .............................................................. $30 Student Support Fee Boarding Students (per semester) .................................................................. $816 Commuting Students (12 hours or more, per semester)................................. $464 Commuting Students (5-11 hours, per semester) ........................................... $260 Page 28 Rochester College Transcript Fee (per copy) ........................................................................................ $5 Vehicle Violation Fines (each violation) ................................................................. $30 GENERAL PAYMENT INFORMATION Rochester College’s continued success in its mission and growth depends on the timeliness of the student’s payment. Rochester College expects accounts to be paid on time, according to one of the payment options listed below. All fees are assessed and payable in US Dollars. Cash, Check, or Money Order Checks and money orders should be made payable to Rochester College and brought or mailed to the Business Office. Credit Card Credit card payments may be made in person or called in directly to the cashier at 248.218.2051. An automatic charge may be established for the semester payment plan by completing a form and submitting it to the Business Office. PAYMENT OPTIONS Payment at Registration Students must have any prior balances on their account settled before beginning the registration process. Full payment or the first installment of the payment plan is due on the semester due date. A student will be unofficially registered at the time of registration until payment is received. A student will not be able to attend class or receive credit on their transcripts for any courses until they are officially registered. Fall Semester August 27 September 15 February 15 Installment 3 October 15 March 15 Installment 4 November 15 April 15 Collection Agency Placements Accounts placed with a collection agency will be charged collection costs, and possible legal fees. The student becomes responsible to the collection agency for all contact and payment arrangements. Readmission to the College will not be permitted until the amount in collections is paid in full. REFUNDS AND CREDITS Withdrawal from College In case of voluntary withdrawal, refunds for tuition, room, board, and certain fees are calculated according to academic, housing, and federal refund policies. Tuition refunds will not be granted if a student withdraws after 5 weeks into the semester. Students who withdraw early may be responsible for remaining charges on their account even though the semester was not completed. Consult the Financial Aid Office and the Business Office for more information about the possible consequences of withdrawal. Refund Schedule 2010-2011 – Full Semester Courses January 6 Installment 2 Past Due Accounts The College will not release transcripts if there is a Business Office hold on the student’s account. Students with delinquent accounts (past due 30 days or more) may not be allowed to register for subsequent semesters. A finance charge of 1.5% (18% APR) is applied monthly to delinquent accounts. Nonpayment of delinquent accounts may result in suspension or placement of the account with a collection agency. Spring Semester Initial Payment DELINQUENT ACCOUNTS Fall Semester Spring Semester Rochester College Page 29 January 10 100% September 1-7 Semester Payment Plan Students unable to pay the full amount on the payment due date may use the semester payment plan. One-third of the total semester cost (minus financial aid credits) must be paid on the payment due date, and the remaining two-thirds are paid in three equal monthly payments due on or before the dates listed above. There is a $60 fee per semester for use of the payment plan. Students may be charged a $35 late fee if payments arrive after the due date. The payment plan may be unavailable to students with a history of late payments or a previous Rochester College account passed to a collection agency. August 31 January 11-17 90% September 8-14 January 18-24 80% September 15-21 January 25-31 60% September 16-28 February 1-7 40% September 29-October 5 February 8-14 20% October 6 to the last day to withdraw February 15 to the last day to withdraw 0% Page 30 Rochester College they are no longer enrolled at the college. Any funds added to the card by the student may be returned to the student at the end of the semester upon request. Refunds for 9-Week Online Courses On or before the designated start date of the course (as stated on the schedule in the registration packet) 100% 1-6 calendar days following the course start date 90% 7-13 calendar days following the course start date 50% 14-20 calendar days following the course start date 25% 21+ calendar days following the course start date 0% Course Refunds Traditional students who drop or withdraw from a course but remain enrolled in one or more courses will receive a refund for the course(s) based on the chart above. Refund policies for the Center for Extended Learning are described on page 137. Students will not receive a refund if a dropped class does not result in a change in the tuition block (12 to 18 hours). Any drop or add that does not result in a net change in course load also will not be subject to a refund. Changes in course load may adversely affect a student’s financial aid awards. Students should consult the Financial Aid Office and the Business Office prior to dropping or withdrawing from a course. General Refund Policies Tuition refunds are based on the number of class periods. Students who choose to commute or withdraw before the last day to withdraw for the semester may receive a refund of room and board charges calculated on a prorated basis. No refunds are granted for previous unused meals. Special fees may not be refunded. Room security deposits are refunded only when checkout procedures are completed within seven days of the date that residence halls close and keys have been returned. The date withdrawal forms are submitted is the date used to calculate refunds (see above). If a request to withdraw is made by phone and the written request arrives at the College within one week of the request, the date of withdrawal will be the date the forms were requested. Otherwise, the date of withdrawal will be the date the request is received in writing. Rochester College has no obligation to refund any charges if withdrawals or dismissals are due to misbehavior. Students involved in disciplinary situations may also be required to repay college-funded awards. Refunds may require up to 30 days for processing. Financial aid funds refunded to issuing programs are allocated in the following order: Stafford Loan, PLUS Loan, Perkins Loan, Pell Grant, Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant, and institutional aid. Residential students receive a $100.00 credit on their swipe card for 19-meal board plan. This credit can be used for cafeteria and café purchases, laundry expenses and making copies in the library. This credit carries over each semester a student is enrolled. This is a use it or lose it plan; students will lose this credit at the time Rochester College Page 31 Military reservists called to active duty while a semester is in progress are encouraged to complete any partial semester work. If completion is not possible or takes longer than two calendar years after the time of activation, reservists will receive withdrawal grades for incomplete course work and tuition vouchers for the number of incomplete semester hours previously paid by the student and government-funded aid. The tuition voucher may be used at Rochester College for the same number of semester hours in any subsequent semester even if tuition rates are higher. Room and board charges are refunded on a prorated basis. Students with circumstances that warrant exceptions to refund policies should address a written appeal to the Controller. WITHDRAWAL PROCESS To withdraw from the College, obtain a withdrawal form from the Student Development Office and follow the steps below. Students who are no longer on campus may call the Student Development Office to obtain necessary forms. Withdrawals are considered official on the date of a phone call only if all forms are completed and returned within one week. Failure to complete this process may result in a grade of F in all classes and/or no refunds on accounts. 1. Student Development. Complete an exit interview. Residents must also turn in room and mailbox keys and ID card, and leave a forwarding address for mail. 2. Ham Library. Return all outstanding materials to the library. Have librarian post any charges to the withdrawal form. 3. Academic Services. Complete a withdrawal slip to be withdrawn from your courses. 4. Financial Aid. Have an exit interview to assess whether additional financial aid may be available to cover current obligations, and to discuss loan repayment obligations. 5. Business Office. Have an exit interview with the Student Accounts Manager in the Business Office. Refunds (room deposit, etc.) will be calculated after 30 days when all charges and adjustments have cleared the Business Office. FINANCIAL AID WITHDRAWAL POLICY Summary of the Requirements of 34 CFR 668.22 (provided to students as part of consumer information) Treatment of Title IV Aid When a Student Withdraws After Beginning Attendance The law specifies how Rochester College must determine the amount of Title IV program assistance that you earn if you withdraw from school. The Title IV programs that are covered by this law are: Federal Pell Grants, Academic Competitiveness Grants, National SMART grants, Stafford Loans, PLUS Loans, Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants (FSEOGs), and Federal Perkins Loans. When you withdraw during your payment period or period of enrollment (your school can define these for you and tell you which one applies) the amount of Title Page 32 Rochester College IV program assistance that you have earned up to that point is determined by a specific formula. If you received (or your school or parent received on your behalf) less assistance than the amount that you earned, you may be able to receive those additional funds. If you received more assistance than you earned, the excess funds must be returned by the school and/or you. The amount of assistance that you have earned is determined on a prorata basis. For example, if you completed 30% of your payment period or period of enrollment, you earn 30% of the assistance you were originally scheduled to receive. Once you have completed more than 60% of the payment period or period of enrollment, you earn all the assistance that you were scheduled to receive for that period. If you did not receive all of the funds that you earned, you may be due a postwithdrawal disbursement. If the post-withdrawal disbursement includes loan funds, your school must get your permission before it can disburse them. You may choose to decline some or all of the loan funds so that you don’t incur additional debt. Your school may automatically use all or a portion of your post-withdrawal disbursement (including loan funds, if you accept them) for tuition, fees, and room and board charges (as contracted with the school). For all other school charges, the school needs your permission to use the post-withdrawal disbursement. If you do not give your permission (which some schools ask for when you enroll), you will be offered the funds. However, it may be in your best interest to allow the school to keep the funds to reduce your debt at the school. arrangements with your school or the Department of Education to return the unearned grant funds. The requirements for Title IV program funds when you withdraw are separate from any refund policy that your school may have. Therefore, you may still owe funds to the school to cover unpaid institutional charges. Your school may also charge you for any Title IV program funds that the school was required to return. If you don’t already know what your school’s refund policy is, you can ask your school for a copy. Your school can also provide you with the requirements and procedures for officially withdrawing from school. If you have questions about your Title IV program funds, you can call the Federal Student Aid Information Center at 1-800-4-FEDAID (1-800-433-3243). TTY users may call 1-800-730-8913. Information is also available on Student Aid on the Web at www.studentaid.ed.gov. Your school must also get your permission before it can disburse directly to you any Title IV grant funds that are part of a post-withdrawal disbursement. There are some Title IV funds that you were scheduled to receive that cannot be disbursed to you once you withdraw because of other eligibility requirements. For example, if you are a first-time, first-year undergraduate student and you have not completed the first 30 days of your program before you withdraw, you will not receive any FFEL or Direct loan funds that you would have received had you remained enrolled past the 30th day. If you receive (or your school or parent receives on your behalf) excess Title IV program funds that must be returned, your school must return a portion of the excess equal to the lesser of: 1. your institutional charges multiplied by the unearned percentage of your funds, or 2. the entire amount of excess funds. The school must return this amount even if it didn’t keep this amount of your Title IV program funds. If your school is not required to return all of the excess funds, you must return the remaining amount. Any loan funds that you must return, you (or your parent for a PLUS Loan) repay in accordance with the terms of the promissory note. That is, you make scheduled payments to the holder of the loan over a period of time. Any amount of unearned grant funds that you must return is called an overpayment. The amount of a grant overpayment that you must repay is half of the grant funds you received or were scheduled to receive. You must make Rochester College Page 33 Page 34 Rochester College FINANCIAL AID There are many resources available to help meet the challenge of paying for college. Financial assistance is available from government, institutional, and many third-party sources. Our commitment is to assist students in obtaining all aid for which they are eligible, while funds are available. Aid may be awarded based on academic merit, financial need, and/or campus involvement. Rochester College participates in a variety of financial aid programs for the benefit of students. Students must meet the eligibility requirements of these programs in order to participate. Rochester College administers its financial aid programs in accordance with prevailing federal and state laws and its own institutional policies. Students are responsible for providing all requested documentation in a timely manner. Failure to do so could jeopardize the student’s financial aid eligibility. In order to remain eligible for financial aid, a student must maintain satisfactory academic progress as defined in this catalog. More information about aid sources can be accessed from www.finaid.org. Rochester College recommends that students apply for financial aid as early as possible in order to allow sufficient time for application processing. Financial aid must be accepted and approved, and all necessary documentation completed before the financial aid can be applied towards tuition and fees. Financial aid is awarded on an academic year basis; therefore, it is necessary to re-apply for financial aid for each academic year. Students may have to apply for financial aid more than once a year, depending on their date of enrollment. Students who need additional information and guidance should contact the Financial Aid Office. Rochester College awards some institutional aid to qualified applicants enrolled full-time in the traditional program, regardless of family income. Institutional aid will be adjusted according to the amount of Federal or State aid a student receives. Recipients of the Trustee Scholarship are not eligible to receive additional institutional aid. Failure to comply with minimum grade requirements or College regulations may result in a loss of institutional awards. The Financial Aid Office provides detailed descriptions of programs, qualifications, and minimum renewal requirements for institutional and government aid. The Financial Aid Office also designs financial aid packages which combine scholarships, grants, loans, and part-time employment to meet students’ financial needs. Some institutional aid may not be available to students who live off-campus. See page 19 for residency requirements that affect financial aid. Exceptions may be considered when the residence halls are at capacity. HOW TO APPLY FOR MAXIMUM AID 1. Complete the Rochester College Scholarship Application and return it as soon as possible during the senior year in high school. An “Application for Undergraduate Admissions” (accompanied by the $35 fee) must be submitted before any consideration for RC scholarships. 2. Apply for a Federal PIN number at www.pin.ed.gov. Submit an email address to receive a pin within 72 hours. Parents of dependent students must also apply for a pin. 3. After receipt of the appropriate pin numbers, complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) at www.fafsa.ed.gov. The FAFSA may be completed as early as January 1 of the senior year. To ensure qualification for the maximum amount of financial aid, complete your FAFSA by March 1. Please be sure to list Rochester College as your first school choice in step 6 of the form. Our federal school code is 002288. 4. Shortly after the FAFSA has been processed, the student will receive a Student Aid Report (SAR) in the mail. Please read it carefully. If everything is correct, simply retain the SAR for your records. If there are any errors or corrections that need to be made, please make them online at www.fafsa.ed.gov and then click the “Make Corrections to a Processed FAFSA” link. The Federal Pin number is necessary in order to make any corrections. 5. Once Rochester College receives the SAR from the government, if selected for verification, the Financial Aid office will contact and inform the student of the proper course of action. If not selected for verification the student will be sent an “offered” award letter listing all scholarships, state grants (if applicable) and federal aid (grants, work-study, and loans) for which the student qualifies. 6. Upon receiving the financial aid award letter, review the information carefully. Please initial the awards where indicated to “accept” or “deny” and return it to the Financial Aid Office by the deadline (a postage-paid envelope will be included for this purpose). If additional information has been requested please submit it at this time also. *Please note that award letters are based on information supplied by the student; so are subject to change and require a response within 30 days, as Rochester College is continually seeking eligible students. A renewal FAFSA application must be completed for subsequent years. Contact the Financial Aid office by phone at 800.521.6010, opt. 2, by fax at 248.218.2065, or by email at fa@rc.edu. ROCHESTER COLLEGE SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS POLICY Federal regulations require that financial aid recipients maintain satisfactory academic progress in a program of study that leads to a degree, certification or transfer program. The following minimum requirements are used to measure a student’s Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) towards the completion of a degree or certificate. These minimum requirements are: A. B. Rochester College Page 35 Page 36 Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) consistent with graduation requirements: 2.0 Cumulative Completion Rate (CCR) of 67%, determined as follows: Rochester College Academic Actions Cumulative Credits Completed Cumulative Credits Attempted 1. Cumulative Credits Completed does not include: “F” Failing, “W” Withdrawal, and “I” Incomplete. Cumulative Attempted Hours includes: successfully completed hours, accepted transfer hours, courses previously taken and repeated, "W's", "F's", and "I's". Courses not considered hours attempted or completed when calculating SAP include: audited and remedial courses. C. Traditional students on Academic Probation must log a minimum of 6 hours per week in the ACE lab (failure to do so will result in loss of eligibility to participate in sports and other extra-curricular activities), take no more than 12 credit hours, and if employed by Rochester College will not be eligible for on-campus work until cleared of academic actions. To be reinstated to normal status, students must improve their CGPA to 2.0 or higher. Students may be continued on Academic Probation if they earn a semester GPA of 2.0 or higher during the semester they are on Academic Probation. Students who do not meet the minimum CGPA requirement of 2.0 the semester after being placed or continued on Academic Probation are placed on Academic Suspension. Duration of eligibility, which is up to 150% of the program’s length. A student must complete the requirements for the degree within 150% of the time it normally takes to complete the degree. Once a student has attempted 150% of the minimum credits required to graduate they are no longer eligible for financial aid. Traditional Student Example: 128 credits required for a degree X 150% = 192 credit hours a student may attempt while working on the degree. 2. CEL Student Example: 120 credits required for a degree X 150% = 180 credit hours a student may attempt while working on the degree. Academic Suspension: Students who do not meet the minimum CGPA requirement of 2.0 the semester after being placed or continued on academic probation or any time after their first two academic years of enrollment are placed on academic suspension. Students who are academically suspended may enroll for up to 6 hours of credit during the suspension semester; however, they are not eligible for financial aid from government or college sources. MONITORING THE MINIMUM SAP REQUIREMENTS A. Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) At the end of each semester, the Registrar’s office will review the student’s file to determine if the student is maintaining Satisfactory Academic Progress requirements. Failing to maintain the required minimum 2.0 CGPA during the first two academic years of enrollment will result in the sequential academic actions described below. Failing to maintain the required minimum 2.0 CGPA any time after the first two academic years of enrollment will result in Academic Suspension. Note: Students will be notified in writing that an academic action has been taken. Academic action notices will be distributed after final grades are reported for the semester. Copies of academic suspension notices will be forwarded to the Financial Aid office. To be reinstated to normal status, students must earn a CGPA of 2.0 or higher. B. Cumulative Completion Rate (CCR) In addition to maintaining the required minimum CGPA of 2.0 a student must also maintain a minimum completion rate of hours attempted of 67%. After the spring semester of each academic year, the Financial Aid office will determine the CCR for each student. Failing to maintain the required minimum CCR of 67% will result in the sequential CCR actions described below. Note: Students will be notified in writing when a CCR action has been taken. CCR action notices will be distributed after final grades are reported for the spring semester. Copies of CCR suspension notices will be forwarded to the Academic Services office. Academic Alert Academic Alert applies only to students new to Rochester College who are admitted, but who do not meet the unconditional admission requirements due to high school GPA or ACT/SAT Scores. Traditional students on Academic Alert must spend a minimum of 6 hours per week in the ACE lab and take no more than 15 credit hours. 1. CCR Probation: If the student’s CCR is below the required minimum of 67% the student will be placed on CCR probation until the following spring semester. 2. CCR Suspension: If the student’s CCR is below the required minimum of 67% at the end of the following spring semester, the student will be placed on CCR suspension and will not be eligible for federal financial aid the following semester. The student will be notified by the Financial Aid office in writing that s/he is ineligible for federal financial aid. To achieve normal status, students must earn a CGPA of 2.0 or higher. Students who do not meet the minimum CGPA requirement of 2.0 during the first semester after being admitted on Academic Alert are placed on Academic Probation. Rochester College Academic Probation: Students on Academic Alert and all other students who do not meet the minimum CGPA requirement of 2.0 are placed on Academic Probation. Page 37 Page 38 Rochester College Students will remain ineligible until they meet the required minimum CCR of 67%. The suspension notice will inform the student what s/he must achieve and the number of credits that must be successfully completed by the end of the following spring semester in order to meet the SAP requirements. Individual students may request a review of their CCR after any semester if they believe they have met the required minimum CCR of 67%. C. Duration of Eligibility—150% of the program’s length A student must complete the requirements for the degree within 150% of the time it normally takes to complete the degree. Once a student has attempted 150% of the minimum credits required to graduate they are no longer eligible for financial aid. However, if there are extenuating circumstance the student may file an appeal. Traditional Student Example: 128 semester hours required for a degree X 150% = 192 semester hours a student may attempt while working on the degree. CEL Student Example: 120 semester hours required for a degree X 150% = 180 semester hours a student may attempt while working on the degree. APPEAL PROCESS In order to be removed from academic probation or suspension, the student’s cumulative GPA must be at least 2.0. Students who have been placed on suspension, or have exceeded the 150% limit may file an appeal to the Financial Aid Appeals Committee for continued financial aid eligibility if they have extenuating circumstances. Appeals may only be granted for the following: death of a relative, injury or illness of the student, or other special circumstances. Appeals must be submitted in writing to the financial aid office. Appeals should include: 1. A letter of explanation for the appeal. 2. Third party documentation supporting the reason for your appeal. The documentation will be reviewed and students will receive written notification of the result of their appeal within two weeks from submission of their documentation. If the appeal is granted, the student will be able to receive aid for the term(s) listed in the notification; however, for financial aid eligibility to continue, students must meet the SAP requirements by the end of the term specified in the notification. All decisions of the Financial Aid Appeals Committee are final. REPEATED COURSES Courses that are repeated for which the student previously received a grade of “F” or “W” will count in the calculation of hours attempted. The grade from the first attempt will not be included in calculating the CGPA. Courses that are repeated for which the student previously received a passing grade will not count toward determining financial aid eligibility during the semester taken, although it will count toward cumulative attempted hours. Example: A student takes four 3-credit-hour courses in a given semester (12 credit hours total). One course is a repeat of a successfully completed course. Subsequently, the financial aid determination for that semester will be based on 9 credit hours. Rochester College Page 39 CHANGE OF DEGREE PLAN Students wishing to change their degree plan should notify the Financial Aid Office about making a determination of eligibility for the new program of study. The SAP determination for the new degree will include the grades and credits attempted/earned that can be transferred into the new degree. ADDITIONAL DEGREE Students wishing seek an additional degree should receive new degree approval from the Academic Services Office and then notify the Financial Aid Office to make a determination of eligibility for the additional program of study. The SAP determination for the additional degree will include the credits attempted/earned that can be transferred into the new degree. TRANSFER CREDITS Transfer credits earned at another institution that are accepted at RC toward the degree a student is currently pursuing shall be used in computing the total credits attempted and earned but will not be used in determining the CGPA. Transfer credit may apply toward a traditional degree but is limited to no more than 34 semester hours toward the Associate’s degree and 98 hours toward the Bachelor’s degree. In the Center for Extended Learning, up to 47 semester hours may transfer toward an Associate’s degree and up to 90 semester hours may be transferred toward the Bachelor’s degree completion program. For any degree at least 50% of a student’s major core must be earned at Rochester College. LOANS Federal Perkins Loan Amounts awarded are based on annual legislation. Repayment and interest begins six months after last date of attendance, or when the student drops below half-time status. Payments may be extended over a ten-year period. Application is made directly to Rochester College by submitting the FAFSA form. Federal Direct Stafford Loan Federal Direct Stafford loans are low interest loans. The loan must be used to pay for direct and/ or indirect educational expenses. Subsidized Stafford loans are need based while unsubsidized loans are not. Repayment begins six months after the student graduates, withdraws from school, or falls below half-time enrollment status. Federal Direct PLUS Loan Federal Direct Plus loan is available to parents of dependent undergraduate students. These loans are not based on need but when combined with other resources cannot exceed the student’s cost of attendance. A credit check is required and either or both parents may borrow through this program. Repayment begins within 60 days of final disbursement. Page 40 Rochester College SPECIAL SOURCES OF AID SCHOLARSHIP INFORMATION Private Funds Churches, civic clubs, employers, and unions offer financial awards which are included in the total financial aid package when determining eligibility for government and some private assistance. Please check with the Financial Aid office for scholarship availability and requirements. All financial aid awarded will be based on available funding. Rochester College reserves the right to revise awards according to government regulations. Veteran’s Benefits Military veterans or immediate family of veterans, deceased or permanently disabled as the result of service, may qualify for assistance. For information, contact a Veterans Administration Office. Students may receive credit for training in the armed services or previous course work by sending an official transcript from each institution to the Academic Services Office. Academic Services must receive transcripts by the end of the first semester of enrollment. Some general education requirements may be waived based upon age, number of hours completed, and appropriate work experience. Records of academic work completed at Rochester College may be released to other institutions and agencies only upon written request. You may contact the Financial Aid office by phone at 800.521.6010, opt. 2, by fax at 248.218.2065, or by email at fa@rc.edu. For a complete listing of current institutional scholarships, please visit the www.rc.edu/getfinancialaid. Students who are certified for Veterans Administration benefits but who fail to obtain the minimum cumulative GPA within one semester after being placed on academic alert may not be recertified until their cumulative GPA meets the minimum standards identified in the Academic Alert and Academic Progress Statements. Rochester College informs the Veterans Administration when students are not recertified due to lack of academic progress. While this policy does not affect the College’s policies regarding academic probation and suspension, those policies do affect certification for veteran’s benefits. The standards of progress and alert policies are found on page 36. Students within one semester (12 hours) of graduation may continue to be certified for veterans’ benefits only with a cumulative GPA of 2.00 or higher, which meets requirements for both the Bachelor’s and Associate’s degrees. The above policies regarding certification for veteran’s benefits supersede any and all previous statements of these policies. EMPLOYMENT Federal Work Study This Federal aid program provides campus work for students with financial need. A similar program exists for Michigan residents. Students are encouraged to sign a form to apply all earnings directly to their student account. Student Payroll Deduction forms are located in the Business Office. Off-Campus Employment Area businesses often seek Rochester College students for part-time jobs. Fulltime students are encouraged to work no more than 20 hours per week. Students on academic probation or academic alert are restricted to working a maximum of 12 hours per week. INSTITUTIONAL DISCOUNTS AND SCHOLARSHIPS Students must be enrolled full-time to receive institutional discounts and scholarships and may also be required to be campus residents. All discounts and scholarships are for a maximum of 10 traditional semesters (excluding Summer semesters) and a maximum of 18 hours per semester, unless otherwise indicated. Rochester College Page 41 Page 42 Rochester College ACADEMICS For more information, contact the ACE lab at 248.218.2173 or e-mail acelab@rc.edu. Rochester College is dedicated to the encouragement, support, and patronage of learning through academic research, excellent teaching, and definitive scholarship in the liberal arts and in line with professional pursuits. The College seeks to provide a climate where intellectual pursuit is exercised in the most favorable circumstances, academic freedom is fully respected, and inquiry, dialogue, and discernment are foundational. All professors are deeply committed to Christian faith and practice, and to the central educational task of expanding and enabling the life of the mind. Chapel/Convocation Series ACADEMIC ACCREDITATION Rochester College is accredited by The Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association (30 North LaSalle, Suite 2400, Chicago, Illinois, 60602. Phone 312.263.0456.) The college is also a signatory of the MACRAO Transfer Agreement, which facilitates the transferability of credits between this and other Michigan institutions. A CHRISTIAN INTEGRATED LEARNING COMMUNITY Beginning in the fall of 2009, Rochester College embodies an overall academic model called a Christian “Integrated Learning Community” (ILC). ILC is an approach to education which recognizes that learning happens most effectively when it takes place in small communities, when it focuses on all of life, and when it is offered in creative formats. In other words, an education should not merely be a series of classes strung together on paper for a degree plan. A true education “integrates” classroom experiences with the rest of life. It is a journey that students take together as part of a community. As students live, study, eat, play, travel, serve, and pray together, they do not just obtain knowledge of certain subjects— they gain the experience and wisdom that make knowledge valuable. Rochester College lives into the ILC model by taking advantage of its small size, and by pursuing a classic and transformative approach to education. As part of Rochester College’s Christian mission and Integrated Learning model, every full-time traditional student is required to participate in the Rochester College Chapel/Convocation series (RCC). The RCC series offers opportunities for students to participate in community assemblies, small groups, and service initiatives which are aimed at building Christian faith and community, affirming Christian values, and developing a holistic understanding of spiritual, emotional, and physical wellness. The RCC series includes a variety of opportunities, but is especially built around regularly scheduled Chapel and Convocation events. Every full-time traditional student will be enrolled in “RCC 2001: Chapel/ Convocation” during every fall and spring semester attended, with a limit of eight semesters. Students who attend Rochester College for more than eight semesters will not be enrolled in RCC 2001 and will not be required to participate after their eighth semester. RCC 2001 carries one academic credit with a letter grade assigned to it based on a 25-point scale, and corresponding to the number of Chapel/Convocation events attended during the semester as follows: • • • • • 25 points or more 23-24 21-22 19-20 18 or fewer A B C D F There will be no tuition charged for RCC 2001. If a student drops below full-time, the credit is dropped. The maximum RCC credits that can be earned during the course of a degree is eight. These credits do not count toward the overall credits required for the completion of a degree, but they will be calculated as part of a student’s overall GPA and graduation honors. CHILL (Campus Hub of Integrated Learning and Living) The CHILL is the physical hub of the integrated culture on campus. Centrally located, it houses a “learning commons,” the Academic Center for Excellence (ACE—see more below), and is a central location for unique classroom opportunities, special ILC activities, and Campus Ministry. Academic Center for Excellence (ACE) The Academic Center for Excellence (ACE) is Rochester College’s home for academic support. ACE exists to facilitate a successful college experience for each student by providing tutors to assist with math, English and various other courses. Centrally located near the cafeteria, the ACE lab offers an alternative place to study in close proximity to academic resources and assistance. ACE also provides supplemental instruction (SI) for select courses, including optional study sessions led by students with a high degree of success in each course. During the traditional school year, tutoring is available on a walk-in basis. For summer semesters, assistance is available by appointment. A schedule of RCC events will be published every semester, but will always include Chapel and Convocation events which occur every Tuesday and Thursday morning Rochester College Page 44 Page 43 Rochester College throughout the fall and spring semesters. Attendance at these events is recorded by card readers which require students to have their student ID cards. Credit will only be given to those students who have their ID cards scanned. Lost, stolen, or damaged cards should be replaced as soon as possible at the Student Development Office. Graduate, part-time, non-traditional, and non degree-seeking students will not be enrolled in the RCC program. Otherwise, there are only three exemptions that will be considered: (1) Students who can demonstrate through the presentation of birth certificates and IDs that they are parents dealing with childcare issues; (2) Education majors during the semester of student teaching; and (3) Mass Communication majors during the semester(s) of Specs Howard attendance requirements. All such inquiries should be directed to the Dean of Students. Students who are academically suspended may enroll for up to 6 hours of credit during the suspension semester; however, they are not eligible for financial aid from government or college sources. Appeals for Academic Actions In order to be removed from academic probation or suspension, the student’s cumulative GPA must be at least 2.0. Academically suspended students must submit a written appeal letter to the Academic Life Committee to be permitted to take more than six hours while on suspension. The Academic Life Committee makes the final decision to accept or reject the appeal. Further details can be obtained from the Academic Services Office. Written appeals must be submitted to the Registrar. COURSE INFORMATION ACADEMIC STATUS See page 36 for the complete satisfactory academic progress policy. ACADEMIC SUPPORT Academic Alert Academic Alert applies only to students new to Rochester College who are admitted, but who do not meet the unconditional admission requirements due to high school GPA or ACT/SAT Scores. Traditional students on Academic Alert must spend a minimum of 6 hours per week in the ACE lab and take no more than 15 credit hours. The Academic Center for Excellence (ACE) supports the college's academic vision. The ACE staff and peer academic assistants offer free tutoring in math, writing, Biblical studies and various other courses. The ACE Lab, equipped with computers and study aids, is located in the lower level of the CHILL. Students interested in developing study strategies can call this academic support office at 248-218-2174. For current ACE hours and tutor availability, call 248-218-2173 or go to the ACE link at www.rc.edu. To achieve normal status, students must earn a CGPA of 2.0 or higher. Students who do not meet the minimum CGPA requirement of 2.0 during the first semester after being admitted on Academic Alert are placed on Academic Probation. Academic Actions Academic Probation: Students on Academic Alert and all other students who do not meet the minimum CGPA requirement of 2.0 are placed on Academic Probation. Traditional students on Academic Probation must log a minimum of 6 hours per week in the ACE lab (failure to do so will result in loss of eligibility to participate in sports and other extra-curricular activities), take no more than 12 credit hours, and if employed by Rochester College will not be eligible for on-campus work until cleared of academic actions. To be reinstated to normal status, students must improve their CGPA to 2.0 or higher. Students may be continued on Academic Probation if they earn a semester GPA of 2.0 or higher during the semester they are on Academic Probation. Students who do not meet the minimum CGPA requirement of 2.0 the semester after being placed or continued on Academic Probation will then be placed on Academic Suspension. Academic Suspension: Students who do not meet the minimum CGPA requirement of 2.0 the semester after being placed or continued on academic probation or any time after their first two academic years of enrollment are placed on academic suspension. Rochester College Page 45 ADVISING Each student is assigned an academic advisor to help clarify life/career goals and develop educational plans for completion of these goals. Upon declaring a major, students are assigned a faculty advisor in that discipline to serve as their major academic advisor. Students are encouraged to make contact with their major advisor early in their academic career, and should consult the advisor in planning course selection sequence, semester schedules, and in outlining the degree plan. For questions concerning advisor assignments and academic advising information contact the Academic Services Office at 248.218.2091. APPEALS Disputes regarding course grades, class policies, or other issues should be discussed with the appropriate instructor. If the instructor does not resolve the matter, complaints should be directed to the Department Chair, the Academic Dean, and the Faculty Affairs Committee (in that order). Appeals to the Faculty Affairs Committee must be in writing, must contain all supporting documentation, and must be submitted within one semester of the incident or grade report. The written appeal must be submitted to the Academic Dean who will forward it to the committee. The decision of the Faculty Affairs Committee is final. ATTENDANCE POLICY Rochester College expects regular and punctual attendance, which is checked by each instructor and may affect final course grades. Students are responsible for Page 46 Rochester College reading the attendance policy explained in each class syllabus. Students who miss more than 30% of scheduled class meetings will not be able to pass the course. Note: Instructors may impose a more restrictive attendance requirement in their course syllabus. If a student misses more class meetings than allowed by the attendance requirement as stated in the course syllabus, and does not withdraw by the last day to withdraw, the student will receive a grade of F for the course. It is the responsibility of the student to withdraw from the course before the last day to withdraw (November 8 for fall 2010 semester, March 21 for spring 2011 semester). Note: Students who do not attend the first three weeks of any class will be administratively dropped from the class, and charged a $25 drop fee. six hours for those pursuing the Associate’s degree. Transfer students in the Bachelor’s degree program must complete the requirements below. The credits transferred must be applicable to the chosen degree program. One week of institution-approved absences per course may be added for Collegesponsored activities that require frequent travel. Students are normally not allowed to miss more than 30% of class meetings. Students may request an incomplete grade from the Registrar if absences result from unavoidable reasons such as extended illness that is documented by a doctor. Minor illnesses and other personal needs are to be covered by the number of personal absences allowed by the instructor. To drop a class, students must submit a drop form (available in Academic Services) to the Registrar prior to the class drop deadline, or send an email from the student’s RC email account to registrar@rc.edu. Each drop request incurs a $25 drop fee. CLASSIFICATION Instructors do not have to allow makeup of daily in-class work regardless of excuse. Major assignments and examinations may be made up for doctor-documented illnesses and institutionally-approved absences granted by the Academic Services Office. Students must request a makeup within one week of the absence, or the instructor is not obligated to allow the makeup work. For institutionally approved absences, students must make arrangements with the instructor prior to the absence. AUDITING COURSES For a reduced fee, students may take a specific course without being responsible for class assignments and tests. Faculty may choose not to grade assignments completed on an audit basis. Traditional and nontraditional students may take advantage of the audit option. If space in a particular class is limited, matriculating students have enrollment priority over students auditing the course. Audit students are responsible for all regular fees associated with the class. Religion Requirement 1-29 9 30+ 6 Students who only need 6 hours are exempted from the “BIB textual” requirement. Classification is based on total semester hours completed by the end of the semester. Transfer students are unclassified until prior credits are posted to their Rochester College transcript. Thirty hours are required for sophomore status, 60 hours for junior status, and 90 hours for senior status. CODE OF ACADEMIC INTEGRITY At Rochester College students are expected to maintain academic integrity throughout the entire educational process. Students are responsible to read, understand, and adhere to the Code of Academic Integrity. This document presents important definitions, levels of violation, potential sanctions, disciplinary processes, student rights and responsibilities, and appeal processes. The latest version of the Code of Academic Integrity can be found on the college’s website or in the Academic Services office. CONCURRENT ENROLLMENT Certain courses offered by other local colleges and universities are available to Rochester College students who make use of the guest enrollment option. Students are responsible for tuition and fees at other institutions. See the Academic Services Office for details and an application. Students receiving financial aid should also confer with the Financial Aid office, since guest enrollment at another institution may affect financial aid eligibility. Students who wish to take courses from both the Center for Extended Learning and one of the traditional programs should refer to the policies outlined on page 131. COURSE CHANGES CAREER AND TESTING SERVICES Career Services assists students in developing, evaluating, and initiating an effective career plan through self-assessment and exploration of occupational and educational opportunities. The Career Services Office assists students in relating personal interest, skills, and values to academic pursuits, selection of a major, and establishing career goals. Students are given the tools to begin a career planning process that will take them through graduation and into job placement or graduate school. Career Services also handles all CLEP and DANTES testing for students. Contact the Career Services Office in Campus Center for more information. All course changes must be requested in writing by the student. Students may either send an email to registrar@rc.edu from their RC email address, or come into Academic Services and complete a drop/add slip. Students may add or drop courses until the end of the first week of classes each semester, after which full term courses may not be added and withdrawals are noted as ‘W’ on transcripts. Withdrawals are not allowed after the date published on the college calendar. The Office of Academic Services provides drop dates for classes that meet less than the full term. COURSE LOAD CHRISTIAN VALUES REQUIREMENT The Christian Values Requirement of the general education core (see page 59) consists of nine semester hours for students pursuing the Bachelor’s degree and Rochester College Credits Transferred Page 47 A full-time load is considered to be 12 or more semester hours per semester, and an average load is 16 hours. Heavy loads of 19 or more hours must be approved Page 48 Rochester College by the Academic Dean. Nine to 11 hours constitute a three-quarters-time load; six to eight hours constitute a half-time load. DISABILITY ACCOMMODATIONS It is the policy of Rochester College to comply with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 in providing reasonable accommodations to qualified students with disabilities. The College also regards these accommodations to be an essential and logical consequence of its stated Christian orientation. A qualified student with a disability is a person who meets the academic and nonacademic admission criteria essential to participate in the program in question and who, with or without reasonable accommodation, can perform the essential functions of the program or course requirements. Human Resources facilitates reasonable accommodations and support services for any qualified student with a properly documented disability. A disability is a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities. Written documentation from an appropriate professional is required. For a complete description of the policies and procedures associated with disability accommodations, please refer to the Human Resources office. ENNIS & NANCY HAM LIBRARY The library offers electronic, print and audio-visual materials to traditional students, CEL students, faculty and guests. Users have remote and on-campus access to indexing and full-text articles in over 60 electronic periodical databases. The library’s holdings can be found through the online catalog at www.rc.edu/lib. The library home page contains information on electronic resources, Internet resources, contact information and library news. Students will need a Rochester College ID to borrow library materials. WRITING PROFICIENCY REQUIREMENT The objective of the writing proficiency requirement is to aid students in being successful in college coursework while enrolled at Rochester College. To meet this objective, students are required to take Composition A & B during their first academic year at Rochester College. (Extra semesters may be required if preparatory coursework is needed or in the event the student fails to successfully complete a basic writing or composition course.) Various methods of meeting this requirement are as follows: • Transfer of Composition A and/or B: Composition A and/or B with a grade of “C” or higher may be transferred from another accredited institution. • CLEP for Composition A and B Current Exams: College Composition (with or without essay) score of 50 – Comp A and B Freshman College Composition score of 50 = Comp A and B Exams as of July 2010: College Comp with Modular score of 50 = Comp A College Comp with Essay (30 days) score of 50 = Comp A and B • Placement for Fundamentals of Composition, Composition A & B A score below 17 on the ACT English/Writing test will result in a placement in ENG 1013 Fundamentals of Composition. A score of 17 or above on the ACT English/Writing test will result in a placement in ENG 1113 Composition A. A score of 25 or above on the ACT English/Writing Test or a score of 570 or above on the writing portion of the SAT Reasoning Test will waive ENG 1113 Composition A and allow placement directly into ENG 1123 Composition B. • The COMPASS test may also be used to determine placement for Composition. A score of 6 or below results in placement in ENG 1013. A score of 7 or above results in placement in ENG 1113. A score of 10 or above results in placement in ENG 1123. Preparatory Coursework for Composition A and/or B: ENG 1013 Fundamentals of Composition is required of any admitted student who earned a score of 16 or below on the ACT English Test or a score of 400 or below on the writing portion of the SAT Reasoning Test. Students who meet these standards but who struggle with composition skills should take ENG 1013 prior to taking Composition A. A grade of “C” or above must be earned in ENG 1013 or the student will be required to repeat the course and be restricted to 15 credit hours during their next semester and 12 credit hours for each subsequent semester until successfully completed. Grade Requirement for Composition A and/or B: A grade of “C” or above must be earned in Composition A and Composition B or the student will be required to repeat the course and be restricted to 15 credit hours during their next semester and 12 credit hours for each subsequent semester until successfully completed. • Advanced Placement (AP) Credit for Composition A and/or B: An AP score of 3 or 4 will result in the assignment of 3 semester hours for Composition A. An AP score of 5 will result in the assignment of 3 semester hours each for Composition A & B. Rochester College Page 49 Page 50 Rochester College INFORMATION LITERACY REQUIREMENT GLOBAL EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES Traditional students will generally take INF 1011 Information Literacy during their first semester; however, it must be taken no later than the second semester of enrollment. If a student fails, drops, or withdraws from the course, then it must be retaken the next semester of enrollment. If the student fails, drops, or withdraws from the course during two consecutive semesters then the student will be restricted to 12 credit hours (plus INF 1011) for each subsequent semester until the course is successfully completed. Appeals for exceptions to this policy may be directed to the Academic Dean. Students who wish to test out of INF 1011 must successfully pass the test prior to taking the course (see advisor for details). The test may not be taken after the course has begun or after the course has been unsuccessfully attempted. In a world rapidly shrinking through expanding telecommunications and intercontinental travel, an important component of post-secondary education involves studying in other countries and cultures. Rochester College students are offered numerous opportunities for such experiential learning. They may participate in a fifteen-week fall study-abroad program in Europe with the base site located in Vienna, Austria. Between 12 and 18 hours of general education core credits in language, literature, art, history, religion and culture may be taken. Other short-term (two- to four-week) programs are offered over the winter break and in the summer. Sites may include the Middle East and Far East. For more information about GEO, contact program director Dr. Keith Huey at khuey@rc.edu. INDEPENDENT STUDY COURSES GRADES Grades for academic work appear as follows on reports and transcripts: Instructors may sometimes offer courses through independent study. These courses do not meet on a structured basis but do include regular meetings with the instructor. These courses do not fulfill general education requirements unless approved by the academic dean. Eligible students for independent study courses must not be on academic alert or probation, must not be enrolled in their first term, and must receive permission from the instructor and the academic dean. INCOMPLETE COURSES Students are eligible for incomplete grades only when they cannot complete a course for unavoidable reasons such as extended illness. Application forms can be obtained at the Academic Services Office and must be submitted to the instructor(s) and the Registrar within one week of the end of the term in which the incomplete(s) are requested. The instructor(s) will specify the requirements needed to complete the course. Students will be notified of approval or disapproval by the Registrar. An incomplete grade (I) is changed to F if the student does not complete the coursework within three months of the end of the semester. Grade A AB+ B BC+ C CD+ D DF Students are permitted to earn a second Bachelor’s degree (BA, BS, BSN, BBA) by completing at least 32 hours beyond the first degree. Students must meet all requirements for both degrees. P DUAL MAJOR W Students who wish to complete a dual major may do so by completing at least 27 hours of course work related to the additional major and beyond the requirements of the first degree. Students must meet all requirements of the two major programs within the same degree. FINAL EXAMS Students are expected to take final examinations on the announced dates and not before that time. Subject to instructor approval, special circumstances may allow for late completion of final examinations. Rochester College Page 51 Quality Points 4.0 3.7 3.3 3.0 2.7 2 .3 2.0 1.7 1.3 1.0 0.7 0.0 In addition, the following marks may be used on an academic record: I DUAL DEGREE Percentage 93-100% 90-92.9% 87-89.9% 83-86.9% 80-82.9% 77-79.9% 73-76.9% 70-72.9% 67-69.9% 63-66.9% 60-62.9% 59.9% and below R AU (Incomplete)—must be completed within three months of the end of the semester, or grade will be changed to F (Passing)—not calculated in GPA (Repeat)—most recent grade is calculated in GPA, all entries remain part of permanent record (Withdrawn)1—not calculated in GPA, but does count against completion rate for financial aid purposes (Audit)—not calculated in GPA Grades will be available on the student portal (https://my.rc.edu/student/login.asp) after they have been posted. Grades are due by the Tuesday following finals week. Students who need a printed report may request a copy from Academic Services. 1 Withdrawals are noted as W on transcripts after the first week of classes. Page 52 Rochester College GRADUATION Rochester College holds commencement ceremonies in December and May. Attendance is recommended but not required to graduate. A student may not participate in the commencement ceremony if any degree requirements remain outstanding. If a student is uncertain about meeting graduation requirements, he or she should contact the Registrar the semester preceding his or her final semester. Students may not participate in commencement ceremonies if they are taking courses at other colleges during the semester prior to graduation, but must wait until the next commencement ceremony to participate. Each semester, students review their academic progress with their academic advisor. Students starting their final semester must submit a graduation application to Academic Services and pay the graduation fee. Application deadlines for December and May commencement are October 1 and February 1, respectively. The Registrar must receive transcripts from other institutions by the application deadline. If they have not been received by the appropriate date, the student may be moved to a subsequent commencement ceremony provided all documentation has been received. Course substitutions require approval of the Department Chair. Requests for graduation requirement waivers must be submitted in writing to the Academic Dean prior to the last semester of classes. All financial obligations to the college must be fulfilled prior to receipt of transcript or diploma. ACADEMIC HONORS Dean’s List requirements per semester are at least 12 semester hours, a minimum 3.30 GPA, no grade below a C, and no incompletes. Rochester College graduation honors are: Summa Cum Laude (at least 3.85 GPA), Magna Cum Laude (3.60), or Cum Laude (3.30). Honors are based on all college work at Rochester College. Forty-five or more semester hours of course work at Rochester College are required for honors at graduation. Honors are not available for Associate of Arts or Associate of Science graduates. College Level Examination Program (CLEP) and DANTES Subject Standardized Testing Program (DSST) Rochester College offers credit for successful completion of certain CLEP and DANTES exams. Students must attain the standard passing score to receive credit. In addition to the standard testing service fee, the College charges a fee for posting qualifying scores. Students may not seek CLEP or DANTES credit for courses which they attempted in regular attendance or by examination. CLEP and DANTES tests must be taken during the first two semesters a student is enrolled at Rochester College. Students may take CLEP and DANTES exams at other testing centers. Contact the Career Services office for appointments, deadlines for testing, and course equivalencies. REGISTRATION Students are expected to register for classes before the semester registration deadline. Late registration is permitted through the end of the first week of classes each semester. Satisfactory payment arrangements are required to complete the registration process. REPEATING COURSES Students may improve final course grades by repeating courses. All grades appear on a permanent academic record but only the last grade for a repeated course is counted toward graduation requirements and cumulative GPA. Repeated courses incur a regular tuition charge; however, courses that are repeated for which the student previously received a passing grade will not count toward determining financial aid eligibility. RETURNING STUDENTS Returning students who have not been enrolled at Rochester College for more than one year must return under the current degree plan for their program. This may require additional coursework that was not previously required under their old program. NONTRADITIONAL CREDIT SPECIAL COURSES Some students may take advantage of nontraditional opportunities to receive credit for prior training that equates to college-level learning. Testing services (64 hours maximum) and professional schools and training (30 hours maximum) may be counted toward college credit, but not toward the 30-hour residency requirement. A combined maximum of 32 hours toward the Associate’s degree or 64 hours toward the Bachelor’s degree may be available through nontraditional avenues. Up to 60 hours of military credit may be used toward a Bachelor’s degree. With approval of the academic dean and the appropriate division chair, instructors may offer special courses not listed in the College catalog. These courses meet regular hours and carry requirements similar to courses in the regular curriculum. Qualified students may enroll without normal independent study limitations. Advanced Placement High school students may take Advanced Placement (AP) Examinations. The college awards credit for some freshman courses based on AP scores of three, four, or five. Rochester College does not assess grades or fees on Advanced Placement credit. Contact the Academic Services Office for equivalencies. Rochester College Page 53 TRANSCRIPTS Transcripts may be ordered for a fee of $5 per copy. Transcripts will not be released unless student accounts are paid in full and the Business Office grants approval. Students must sign a written authorization for transcript releases. Page 54 Rochester College DEGREE INFORMATION DEGREE OPTIONS – TRADITIONAL PROGRAM Each student is personally responsible for understanding and completing the requirements listed in his or her degree plan. Academic advisors are assigned by the College to assist students with this responsibility. For CEL degree options, please see page 127. DEGREE PLANNING Students may choose a degree plan from the Rochester College catalog published during their first semester of enrollment or any subsequent semester. Students who re-enroll after an absence of 12 months or more may only be re-admitted under the latest degree plan offered for the degree and major being pursued. Students who plan to transfer to another college to complete a major not offered at Rochester College should provide their academic advisor with a catalog from the other institution. This should be done early in the advising process. The student is solely responsible for knowing all degree requirements for both schools. GENERAL REQUIREMENTS To earn a degree, students must meet the following requirements in addition to the courses required by the Bachelor’s degree program: 1. Complete a minimum 128 semester hours (or 120 hours in CEL), including at least 36 semester hours of upper-division (3000 and 4000 level course numbers). 2. Achieve a minimum 2.00 cumulative GPA. 3. Achieve a minimum 2.00 GPA in core courses of the chosen major (or higher if required for a specific major). 4. Complete at least 24 of the last 36 hours at Rochester College (12 of the last 18 for an Associate’s degree). 5. Demonstrate college-level writing proficiency by completing Composition A and B (or their equivalent) with a grade C or above. Refer to page 49 for complete Rochester College Writing Proficiency policy. CHANGING MAJORS If a student starts with one major at Rochester College, then decides to change majors in a later semester, they must meet the requirements in the current year’s catalog. For example, if a student started RC in fall 2008, and changed majors in fall 2010, that student would be required to satisfy all the requirements of the 201011 degree plan, including general education requirements. See the Registrar for any questions on this policy. Rochester College Page 55 Associate of Arts (AA) Associate of Science (AS) Including an AS in pre-nursing Bachelor of Arts (BA) Humanities Concentrations available in History, International Studies, Literature, Literature and Writing, Music, Performing Arts, Pre-law, Religion, and Theatre Interdisciplinary Studies Concentrations available in History, International Studies, Literature, Literature and Writing, Music, Performing Arts, Pre-law, Religion, and Theatre Interdisciplinary Studies with Honors Concentrations that are self-designed and approved by committee Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA) Accounting Interdisciplinary Management Tracks available in Financial Management, Human Resource Management, and Marketing Management Sports Management Bachelor of Science (BS) Behavioral Science Concentration in Social Work Biblical Studies Biology Christian Ministry Education, Elementary Majors available in Integrated Science, Language Arts, Mathematics, and Social Studies Education Education, Secondary Majors available in Biology, English, Social Studies, and Mathematics Education Health Sciences Tracks available in Pre-Pharmacy and Pre-Physician’s Assistant Interdisciplinary Studies Concentrations available in Business, General Science, History, International Studies, Literature, Literature and Writing, Mass Communication, Mathematics, Music, Performing Arts, Pre-law, Premed, Professional Writing, Psychology, Religion, and Theatre Mass Communication Tracks available in Broadcasting, Graphic Design, Public Relations and Media & Communication Arts Nursing Psychology Technical and Professional Studies Incorporates into a BS degree a qualified certificate program in a technical field from another institution Youth and Family Ministry Page 56 Rochester College The General Education Program Courses fulfilling this requirement: required sequence of REL 1003 and REL 1013, plus any other BIB elective. The General Education Program establishes the broad liberal arts core of all bachelor’s degrees. The curriculum emphasizes specific content areas in the liberal arts as well as skill development in areas such as reading comprehension, critical thinking and mathematical analysis, research, writing, and communication. Western Heritage (3) Gives historical, sequential, and/or thematic introductions to the major events, people, institutions, and ideas from different periods in the development of Western civilizations. The requirements for the General Education Program include 18 courses, totaling 49 credit hours. They are organized in the following categories of content and skill. Note: Courses listed below are from the RC offering. Other courses may satisfy the requirements, subject to the approval of the Division Chair. Courses fulfilling this requirement: HIS 1313, 1323, 3313, 3323, 4323; INS 3113; PHI 2013 American Experience (3) This requirement introduces students to the historical and political issues critical for an understanding of American society and life in the United States. Skill Development: (for Reading Comprehension, Writing, Reasoning, and Communication) Courses fulfilling this requirement: Any POS; HIS 2113, 2513, 2523, 3503, 3513, 3523, 3533, 3543, 3553, 4513, 4523, MED 4113 Information Literacy (1) Develops the students’ ability to access, evaluate, assimilate, and use information effectively to accomplish specific academic and personal tasks. Non-Western Studies and Diversity (3) This requirement introduces students to non-Western histories, cultures, and religions, and to the diversities within Western societies. Course fulfilling this requirement: INF 1011 Courses fulfilling this requirement: Anthropology; BIB 4123; COM 3533; EDU 3262/3271 (Ed majors only); ENG 2413, 4413; GEO 1013, 3113; HIS 3423; INS 2123; MUS 3333; PHI 3003, 3043, 3923; PSY 3423; SOC 2013 English Composition (6) Develops a students’ ability to read critically and comprehensively, and to write clearly and effectively for a variety of purposes. Courses fulfilling this requirement: Required sequence of ENG 1113 & ENG 1123. ENG 1003 may be required as a prerequisite for international students or those with an English ACT score of 16 or below. Students exempted from ENG 1113 and/or 1123 may replace those hours with electives. Communication and Speech (3) Introduces students to theory and practice in a variety of communication contexts, with special attention to verbal communication and speech. Courses fulfilling this requirement: COM 1013 Critical Thinking and Mathematical Competency (3) Develops a student’s appreciation of the value of mathematics and logic in history and contemporary society. It enhances reasoning ability and the grasp of logical principles, improves problem solving skills, and develops an understanding of numerical data and statistical methods. Courses fulfilling this requirement: MAT 1103 or above, or PHI 2023 (for Religion and Humanities majors or those with a Math ACT of 25 or above). Moral and Philosophic Reasoning (3) Introduces students to the basic categories and ideas in the fields of philosophy and ethics, giving special attention to the development of analytic and reasoning skills especially as they are related to Christian moral discourse. Courses fulfilling this requirement: PHI 2013, 2933, 2943 Foreign Language (for the BA only) (6-8) Supports the global worldview of the liberal arts and helps students attain functional competency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing at an intermediate level in a foreign language of their choice. Knowledge Enhancement: (of Self, Others, and God) Christian Values (9) These three courses give a college-level, introductory overview of the Christian faith, and to the world and literature of the Bible. The first two are in sequence and are to be taken during the first year of study. Rochester College Page 57 Literature (3) This requirement trains students to understand and appreciate the value and beauty of literature. Students will develop skills for narrative analysis and interpretation, and will learn how to use these skills to explore the cultures, ideas, histories, philosophies, and experiences found in literary classics. Courses fulfilling this requirement: ENG 2413, 3213, 3223, 3313, 3323 Fine Arts Appreciation (3) This requirement is designed to foster an awareness and appreciation of the importance of the arts in one’s life and in society, and to instill a desire for life-long involvement with the arts. Courses fulfilling this requirement: FLM 2013, 2423; HUM 2003; INS 2113; MUS 3333 Laboratory Science (4) This laboratory-based requirement demonstrates the applicability of science to everyday life. Students are introduced to the methods used by scientists to investigate and understand the natural world and are taught to assess the reliability and limitations of those methods. Courses fulfilling this requirement: Any lab science – BIO, CHE, NSC, or PHS. Human Institutions and Behavior (3) Through courses on economics, sociology, and psychology, this requirement develops in students an awareness of the multiple ways that human institutions and behavior can be studied, understood, and predicted. Courses fulfilling this requirement: BUS 2403, 2413; any PSY or SOC; SWK 2013 Health and Fitness (2) By exploring the basics of diet, stress management, and cardiovascular exercise, this requirement develops in students an understanding of and motivation for health, fitness, and care of the self. The requirement also provides an opportunity to focus on one kind of physical activity and develop a recreational appreciation of it. Courses fulfilling this requirement: Any PED course, including team sports. Page 58 Rochester College GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS ASSOCIATE OF ARTS DEGREE To receive the BA or BS degree, students must complete the General Education core. Alternate standards are listed on page 20 for transfer students holding the Associate’s degree. Transfer student variations in the Christian Values Requirement are listed on page 47. The Associate of Arts (AA) degree is available for students who do not intend to complete a four-year program. The AA requires completion of at least 64 hours (with at least 15 hours taken at Rochester College), including divisional requirements, and a 2.00 minimum cumulative GPA. REQUIREMENTS FOR THE GENERAL EDUCATION CORE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE ASSOCIATE OF ARTS DEGREE Skill Development Skill Development Information Literacy: INF 1011 1 Information Literacy: INF 1011 1 English Composition 6 English Composition 6 ENG 1113 Composition A, ACT 25+, SAT 570+, or AP 3 or 4 3 ENG 1113 Composition A, ACT 25+, SAT 570+, or AP 3 or 4 3 ENG 1123 Composition B, or AP score of 5 (Comp A&B) 3 ENG 1123 Composition B, or AP score of 5 (Comp A&B) 3 Communication and Speech: COM 1013 3 Communication and Speech: COM 1013, 2533 3 Critical Thinking Mathematical Competency: MAT 1103 Int. Algebra or above, ACT 25+, or PHI 2023 (Humanities majors) 3 Critical Thinking and Mathematical Competency: MAT 1103 Intermediate Algebra or above or ACT 25+ 3 Moral & Philosophical Reasoning: PHI 2013, 2933, 2943 3 Moral & Philosophical Reasoning: PHI 2013, 2933, 2943 3 Foreign Language (BA only) Knowledge Enhancement 6 -8 Christian Values: REL 1003, 1013, and BIB 2000+ Knowledge Enhancement 9 Christian Values: REL 1003, 1013, and BIB 2000+ 9 Western Heritage: HIS 1313, 1323, 3313, 3323, 4323; INS 3113; PHI 2013 3 Western Heritage: HIS 1313, 1323, 3313, 3323, 4323; INS 3113; PHI 2013 3 American Experience: Any POS; HIS 2113, 2513, 2523, 3503, 3513, 3523, 3533, 3543, 3553, 4513, 4523, MED 4113 3 American Experience: Any POS; HIS 2113, 2513, 2523, 3503, 3513, 3523, 3533, 3543, 3553, 4513, 4523, MED 4113 3 3 Non-Western Studies and Diversity: Anthropology; BIB 4123; COM 3533; ENG 2413, 4413; GEO 1013, 3113; HIS 3423; INS 2123; MUS 3333; PHI 3003, 3043, 3923; PSY 3423, SOC 2013 Non-Western Studies and Diversity: Anthropology; BIB 4123; COM 3533; ENG 2413, 4413; GEO 1013, 3113; HIS 3423; INS 2123; MUS 3333; PHI 3003, 3043, 3923; PSY 3423, SOC 2013 3 Literature: ENG 2413, 3213, 3223, 3313, 3323 3 Literature: ENG 2413, 3213, 3223, 3313, 3323 3 Fine Arts Appreciation: FLM 2013, 2423; HUM 2003; INS 2113; MUS 3333 3 Fine Arts Appreciation: FLM 2013, 2423; HUM 2003; INS 2113; MUS 3333 3 Laboratory Science: BIO, CHE, NSC, or PHS 4 Laboratory Science: BIO, CHE, NSC, or PHS 4 Human Institutions and Behavior: BUS 2403, 2413; any PSY; any SOC; SWK 2013 3 Human Institutions and Behavior: BUS 2403, 2413; any PSY; any SOC; SWK 2013 3 Health and Fitness1: Any PED activity course 2 Health and Fitness1: Any PED activity course 2 Electives 15 TOTAL GENERAL EDUCATION CORE (55-57 hours for BA) 49 TOTAL FOR ASSOCIATE OF ARTS DEGREE 64 1 Veterans may satisfy this requirement through Basic Training. 1 Veterans may satisfy this requirement through Basic Training. Rochester College Page 59 Page 60 Rochester College ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE DEGREE ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE DEGREE IN PRE-NURSING The Associate of Science (AS) degree requires completion of at least 64 hours (at least 15 taken at Rochester College), including divisional requirements, and a 2.00 minimum cumulative GPA. The Associate of Science (AS) degree in Pre-Nursing is available for students who intend to pursue the BSN at RC (pending State approval) and includes same graduation requirements as the AS (see previous page). REQUIREMENTS FOR THE ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE DEGREE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE IN PRE-NURSING Skill Development Skill Development Information Literacy: INF 1011 1 Information Literacy: INF 1011 1 English Composition 6 English Composition 6 ENG 1113 Composition A, ACT 25+, SAT 570+, or AP 3 or 4 3 ENG 1113 Composition A, ACT 25+, SAT 570+, or AP 3 or 4 3 ENG 1123 Composition B, or AP score of 5 (Comp A&B) 3 ENG 1123 Composition B, or AP score of 5 (Comp A&B) 3 Communication and Speech: COM 1013, 2533 3 Communication and Speech: COM 2533 Critical Thinking and Mathematical Competency: MAT 1103 Intermediate Algebra or above or ACT 25+ 3 Critical Thinking and Mathematical Competency: MAT 1103 or 1334 or above or ACT 25+ Moral & Philosophical Reasoning: PHI 2013, 2933, 2943 3 Moral & Philosophical Reasoning: PHI 2943 Knowledge Enhancement 3 3 -4 3 Knowledge Enhancement Christian Values: REL 1003, 1013 6 Christian Values: REL 1003, 1013 6 Western Heritage: HIS 1313, 1323, 3313, 3323, 4323; INS 3113; PHI 2013 3 Western Heritage: HIS 1313, 1323, 3313, 3323, 4323; INS 3113; PHI 2013 3 American Experience: Any POS; HIS 2113, 2513, 2523, 3503, 3513, 3523, 3533, 3543, 3553, 4513, 4523, MED 4113 3 American Experience: Any POS; HIS 2113, 2513, 2523, 3503, 3513, 3523, 3533, 3543, 3553, 4513, 4523, MED 4113 3 Non-Western Studies and Diversity: Anthropology; BIB 4123; COM 3533; ENG 2413, 4413; GEO 1013, 3113; HIS 3423; INS 2123; MUS 3333; PHI 3003, 3043, 3923; PSY 3423, SOC 2013 3 Non-Western Studies and Diversity: Anthropology; BIB 4123; COM 3533; ENG 2413, 4413; GEO 1013, 3113; HIS 3423; INS 2123; MUS 3333; PHI 3003, 3043, 3923; PSY 3423, SOC 2013 3 Literature: ENG 2413, 3213, 3223, 3313, 3323 3 Literature: ENG 2413, 3213, 3223, 3313, 3323 3 Fine Arts Appreciation: FLM 2013, 2423; HUM 2003; INS 2113; MUS 3333 3 Fine Arts Appreciation: FLM 2013, 2423; HUM 2003; INS 2113; MUS 3333 3 Laboratory Science Sequence: BIO, CHE, NSC, or PHS 8 Laboratory Science: CHE 1314/1324 Intro to Chemistry I & II 8 Human Institutions and Behavior: BUS 2403, 2413; any PSY; any SOC; SWK 2013 3 Human Institutions and Behavior: PSY 2013 Gen Psychology 3 Health and Fitness1: Any PED activity course Health and Fitness: PED 2023 and any PED activity course 4 2 Additional Pre-Nursing: BIO 1014, BIO 2011/2013. 8 Additional Science: From BIO; CHE; MAT 1334 or above; and/or NSC; PHS 11 Electives (may include BIO 3324; PSY 2223 for BSN) 3 Electives 3 TOTAL FOR ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE IN PRE-NURSING 64 TOTAL FOR ASSOCIATE OF SCIENCE DEGREE 64 1 Veterans may satisfy this requirement through Basic Training. Rochester College Page 61 Page 62 Rochester College DEPARTMENT OF BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES (PSY, SOC, SWK) MISSION STATEMENT The Department of Behavioral Sciences supports majors designed for the student planning for graduate work in psychology and other related fields. The curriculum is designed to develop strong skills in the theory and practice of the science of psychology, with an emphasis on dealing with the emotional, mental, social, and spiritual needs of others. Courses in social work are designed to prepare students for graduate work in the field of social services. Courses place an emphasis on the Christian model of service. DIVISION OF ARTS AND SCIENCES ACADEMIC OPPORTUNITIES Rochester College offers the Bachelor of Science degree in Psychology or a Behavioral Science degree with a track in Social Work. Interdisciplinary studies majors may choose a psychology concentration as part of the Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree. Minors are available in behavioral science and psychology. CAREER OPPORTUNITIES A major in Psychology or Behavioral Science may lead to entry-level jobs in crisis intervention centers, counseling clinics, community service agencies, or other social agencies. These majors are primarily designed to be used in preparation for graduate studies in psychology, psychotherapy, professional counseling, or social work. The psychology major also supports graduate work in experimental, applied, academic, theoretical, or professional psychology (clinical, counseling, or school psychology, or marriage and family therapy). Psychology graduates are also often sought by employees in sales, public relations, or other human services and resources. ADMISSION TO THE BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES PROGRAM All students seeking a degree with a major in Psychology or Behavioral Science must apply for and be admitted to the Behavioral Science Program or the Psychology Program prior to enrolling for any upper-division courses offered by the Behavioral Science Department. This process is in addition to the general admittance to Rochester College. ADMISSION CRITERIA The following must be documented at the time of application: • • Rochester College Page 63 Minimum cumulative GPA of 2.50. Completion of 30 hours, including the following core courses: ENG 1113 English Comp A ENG 1123 English Comp B MAT 1103 Intermediate Algebra (or higher level MAT) with a C- or higher. PSY 2013 General Psychology PSY 2223 Lifespan Development / PSY 2113 Psych. of Adjustment Page 64 Rochester College Must complete lower level Psychology/Social Work Core courses with a grade of C or higher. Complete the Autobiographical and Professional/Career Goals Statement for the Behavioral Sciences Department. This should be approximately 3-5 pages in length and address your interest in psychology or social work and present your short and long-term goals for your career. • • APPLICATION PROCESS BS with Psychology Major. Presents a broad study of human behavior and insight into psychology as a scientific discipline and professional career. Graduate work is required to certify for practice in most agencies and for licensure as a private therapist. REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BS IN PSYCHOLOGY General Education Core 1. Obtain from the Chair of the Department of Behavioral Sciences and complete an Application for Admission to the Department of Behavioral Sciences for either Psychology or Behavioral Science–Social Work. 2. Return the application to the Chair of the Department of Behavioral Sciences prior to the established deadlines for application: Fall - Monday after Thanksgiving; Spring - Second Monday of April 3. The Department of Behavioral Sciences will review applications of all candidates for both Psychology and Social Work. All applicants will be notified of their admission status by letter from the Department of Behavioral Sciences. SOC 2023 or SOC 2453 recommended (Human Inst/Behavior) 49 3 Psychology Major 39 The Behavioral Sciences Department is a sponsor for Psi Chi, The National Honor Society in Psychology, which offers opportunities for students who excel in their academic coursework in their respective Behavioral Sciences programs. Students invited to join Psi Chi have shown a significant interest in Psychology and must meet the minimum requirements for undergraduate students: Must be enrolled as a student at Rochester College Must have established a GPA at Rochester College Must be enrolled in the final semester prior to graduation Must be enrolled as a major or minor in a psychology program or a program psychological in nature that is equivalent to a psychology major • Must have completed at least 9 semester hours or 14 quarter hours of psychology courses • Must have an overall GPA that is in the top 35% of the senior class (90+ credit hours earned; if the cut-off for the top 35% is below 3.00, the applicant must have an overall GPA of at least 3.00 on a 4-point scale) • Must have a psychology GPA (in PSY course work) that is at least 3.00 on a 4-point scale Students who meet all the criteria for induction will be sent an invitation packet during their final semester of enrollment. PSY 2013 General Psychology 3 PSY 3303 Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences 3 PSY 3323 Research Methods in the Social Sciences 3 PSY 4893 Psychology Seminar 3 PSY 4943 Ethics in Behavioral Science National Honor Society in Psychology – Psi Chi • • • • DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 3 Non-laboratory Core: choose 9 hours PSY 2113 Psychology of Adjustment PSY 2223 Life Span Development PSY 3013 Psychology of Personality PSY 3033 Abnormal Psychology PSY 3043 Brain and Behavior PSY 3053 Health Psychology PSY 3093 History and Systems of Psychology PSY 3123 Social Psychology PSY 3143 Psychology of Religion 9 Laboratory Core: choose 7 hours PSY 3503 Cognitive Psychology PSY 3514 Learning and Memory PSY 3524 Sensation and Perception 7 Advanced Core: choose 8 hours PSY 3203 Child Development PSY 3213 Adolescent Development PSY 3223 Psychology of Adulthood and Aging PSY 3313 Introduction to Psychological Assessment PSY 3403 Introduction to Psychotherapy and Counseling PSY 3423 Diversity and Cross-Cultural Psychology PSY 3433 Industrial/Organizational Psychology PSY 4423 Psychology of Group Processes PSY 4911, 4912, or 4913 Directed Research PSY 4921, 4922, or 4923 Directed Readings Other PSY approved by Department Chair 8 Minor (recommended) Electives Page 65 22 TOTAL FOR PSYCHOLOGY MAJOR Rochester College 18 128 Page 66 Rochester College BS with Behavioral Science Major. Features a track in social work. It includes a practicum in the student’s chosen field of study. Graduate studies normally are required to certify for practice in most agencies and for licensure as a private therapist. REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BS IN BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE General Education Core 49 DEPARTMENT OF HUMANITIES (ART, COM, ENG, FLM, GEO, GER, HIS, HUM, INF, INS, MUS, PHI, POS, SPA, THE) MISSION STATEMENT PSY 2013 General Psychology 3 PSY 2223 Life Span Development 3 Choose one: PSY 3013 Psychology of Personality PSY 3093 History and Systems of Psychology 3 PSY 3303 Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences 3 The faculty in the Humanities Department seek to provide students both breadth and depth in their understanding of the individual disciplines in the humanities and greater awareness of the inter-relationships among these disciplines. Students will explore numerous areas of study for the purpose of identifying their own academic interests and strengths. Along with acquiring a solid knowledge base in a wide range of subjects, students will grow in the intellectual skills of thinking, communicating, and problem solving. The entire range of these academic challenges will be explored in the context of constructing a Christian worldview, through which the student’s individual vocation may be discovered and refined. The graduate of the Humanities programs will be, in the best sense of the phrase, an educated person. PSY 3323 Research Methods in the Social Sciences 3 ACADEMIC OPPORTUNITIES PSY 3403 Introduction to Psychotherapy and Counseling 3 Students may pursue either the Bachelor of Arts degree in Humanities or the Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree in Interdisciplinary Studies. PSY 3423 Diversity and Cross-Cultural Psychology 3 SWK 4893 Field Practicum 3 PSY 4943 Ethics in Behavioral Science 3 SOC 2023 or SOC 2453 recommended (Human Inst/Behavior) 3 Behavioral Science Major Track: Social Work 27 18 PSY 3413 Substance Abuse and Addictive Behaviors or PSY 4423 Psychology of Group Processes SWK 2013 Introduction to Social Work SWK 3003 Human Behavior and the Social Environment SWK 3103 Social Welfare and Public Policy SWK 4403 Social Work Practice I SWK 4413 Social Work Practice II Minor (recommended) 18 Electives 16 TOTAL FOR BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE MAJOR 128 MINORS Behavioral Science Minor—Requires 18 hours of PSY, SOC, SWK 2000 level or above, including six upper-division hours. Counseling Minor—Requires 12 hours of PSY or SOC and six hours from MIN 3613; PSY 3403, 3413, 4403, 4413, 4423, 4493; or SWK 3003. Psychology Minor—Requires 18 hours of PSY, including six upper-division hours, for a psychology minor, and/or SWK 3003. Social Work Minor—Requires six hours of PSY and/or SOC and 12 hours of SWK, including six upper-division hours. Rochester College Page 67 Students completing the baccalaureate in Humanities complete a core of humanities courses that include an introduction to the arts and sciences; focused coursework in history, literature, diversity studies, and performing arts; foreign language literacy coursework; and a Global Educational Opportunities experience. As well as experiencing the breadth of training in the humanities core, students pursuing the baccalaureate in Humanities have the opportunity to pursue in depth a concentration of interest. Concentrations available for focused study include mass communication, general science, history, international studies, literature, literature and writing, mathematics, music, performing arts, pre-law, professional writing, religion and theatre. The combination of the humanities core and the focused concentration will enable students to be prepared and eligible for graduate studies in their area of interest. Students pursuing the baccalaureate in Interdisciplinary Studies select two concentrations for focused study, one concentration in the humanities areas and a second concentration in a broader range of arts, sciences, and professional studies. Students also complete a core of courses in philosophy and liberal arts that allows them to explore, understand, and appreciate the interdisciplinary connections between their concentrations. Students seeking the Bachelor of Arts in Interdisciplinary Studies also complete a foreign language literacy requirement. CAREER OPPORTUNITIES The humanities baccalaureate degrees not only prepare students for rich personal and academic growth, they prepare students to enter into the work world with the competencies that the marketplace is seeking: the ability to communicate clearly and effectively in writing and in speech, the ability to think creatively and critically, the ability to analyze and solve problems, and the ability to work effectively and Page 68 Rochester College constructively with others. Numerous career options are described in the following sections related to the individual concentrations available to the humanities and interdisciplinary studies majors. ENGLISH AND FOREIGN LANGUAGE (ENG, FLM, GER, SPA) MISSION STATEMENT REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BA IN HUMANITIES General Education Core 49 Foreign Language 8 Humanities Major 27 The goal of the faculty in the areas of English and Foreign Language is to enable students to develop written communication and critical thinking skills which will enhance their success in college and in their careers. Through literature courses, the instructors seek to introduce the diversity of existing worldviews, the continuity of the human experience, and an appreciation for the historical, cultural, and spiritual values present in a study of literature. HUM 2103 Introduction to the Arts and Sciences 3 3000+ Western/American Heritage 6 3000+ Non-Western Studies/Diversity 3 Instruction is also provided in the Spanish and German languages. This coursework is designed to introduce students to the language, culture and heritage of Spanish- and German-speaking people. 3000+ Western/American Heritage or Non-Western Studies/Diversity 3 ACADEMIC OPPORTUNITIES 3000+ Literature 6 3000+ Performing Arts 6 Students may choose from three concentrations in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degrees: literature, literature and writing, and professional writing. Students may also select coursework that will enable them to certify to teach English at the secondary level or to teach language arts at the elementary level. Students may choose English courses in fulfillment of minors in English, humanities, and professional writing. Foreign language coursework fulfills a general education requirement in all the Bachelor of Arts programs at Rochester College and serves as a valuable complement to other programs. Humanities Concentration (see list on page 77) 24 Minor (recommended) 18 Electives 2 TOTAL FOR HUMANITIES MAJOR 128 CAREER OPPORTUNITIES Careers available to graduates with concentrations in literature, literature and writing, or professional writing include education, journalism, technical writing, business, law, library science, and government service. Many employers value a liberal arts degree as a solid foundation for the world of work. Concentrations in Literature, Literature and Writing, and Professional Writing provide a better understanding of human nature and universal issues and truths, and help exercise critical thinking skills. In today’s world, foreign language qualifications can be a valuable asset. Organizations engaged in global business seek multilingual graduates to fill positions in business, banking, and finance. Multilingual communicators may find jobs as translators or teachers. MINORS English Minor—Requires 12 hours of ENG above the 2000 level, and six hours of upper-division ENG. Humanities Minor—Requires six hours from ENG 2413, 3213, 3223, 3313, 3323; six hours from ART 2003, FLM 2013, HUM 2003 or 2103; and six upper-division hours of either COM or ENG. Professional Writing Minor—Requires ENG 1123, 2113, 3523, 3613, 4533, and 4523. Rochester College Page 69 Page 70 Rochester College HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE (GEO, HIS, POS) MUSIC, THEATRE, AND VISUAL ARTS (ART, MUS, THE) MISSION STATEMENT MISSION STATEMENT The faculty in the area of history and political science strive to provide a deeper understanding of the world in which we now live by exploring the political, cultural, social, and economic past of the world’s civilizations. The instructors also seek to enrich students’ understanding and knowledge of humanity’s various spiritual heritages. In addition, guidance is offered in historical research, writing skills, and critical thinking. The area of Music, Theatre, and Visual Arts exists to provide an aesthetic education for all students and to enhance the aesthetic awareness of the college community, its constituency, and the community. The faculty seeks to foster an attitude of service, designing programs to prepare students to serve as professional musicians, actors, artists, and teachers with a Christian perspective, and to prepare them for additional study in conservatories and graduate schools. The political science faculty seek to provide credible introductory and upperdivision courses, and to create an environment that inspires discussion regarding the morality of public policies and outcomes of the legal system. All the course offerings emphasize the historical and philosophical foundations of the American government. Legal courses stress the powers of common law courts to make law. ACADEMIC OPPORTUNITIES ACADEMIC OPPORTUNITIES Students may complete the Bachelor of Arts degree in humanities or the Bachelor of Arts or science degree in interdisciplinary studies with concentrations in history and/or political science. These degrees provide an excellent foundation for graduate training in historical studies, law, political science, journalism, library science, education, and many other fields. Teacher certification may be earned in history and social studies, allowing graduates to teach at the elementary or secondary level. Minors in history, American studies, pre-law, and social studies are also available and may be combined with other majors. CAREER OPPORTUNITIES The B.A. or B.S. with a concentration in history provides an excellent foundation for careers in elementary, secondary, or post-secondary education; law; governmental service; journalism; library, museum, and archival work; historical research and writing; and many other fields. Preparation for a law career should include a minimum of a minor is pre-law or American legal studies to accompany the core curriculum of the baccalaureate. Students may pursue a music concentration for the humanities or interdisciplinary studies major, or a minor in music which may be elected to complement any Bachelor’s degree. No more than 8 hours of MUS ensembles or private lessons can be used as electives. Theatre courses are offered as part of the BA in Humanities or Interdisciplinary Studies. Art courses serve as elective credit in any degree program. Courses in art help to provide a broader base of experience for the liberal arts degree. CAREER OPPORTUNITIES Academic groundwork in music prepares students for careers as performers, teachers, conductors, music ministers, support personnel for musical enterprises, or music business persons. Graduate study is highly recommended for those interested in teaching, but advancement in performance and ministry-related fields is often achieved through experience. Academic groundwork in theatre prepares students for careers as performers, theatre managers, stage managers, technical designers, theatre critics, writers, or educators. Theatre training also provides an excellent foundation for a host of other careers including radio and television, music, advertising, marketing, law, public speaking, and ministry. Graduates who have a background in art are better qualified to pursue occupations in education, art design, interior design, museum administration, art collection directorship, and other specializations in the fine arts. MINORS History Minor—18 hours of HIS, including six hours of upper-division. American Studies Minor—Requires BUS 3303; two courses from HIS 3523, 3533, 3543, or 3553; and POS 2023, 2043, and 4013 or 4213. MINOR Pre-Law Minor—Requires BUS 3303; MED 4113; plus 12 hours from POS. Music Minor—Requires MUS 1211, 1213, 1221, 1223, and ten hours of MUS, with six upper-division hours and no more than two hours of ensemble. Social Science Minor—Requires 18 hours, including six hours of upper division credit. Must include at least two of the following: geography, history, political science, psychology, or sociology. Rochester College Page 71 REQUIREMENTS IN MUSIC Each semester, those enrolled in applied music lessons must attend scheduled recitals. Applied music and ensemble courses may be repeated for credit. No more than six hours of ensemble credit may be applied toward a degree unless specified in a track. Page 72 Rochester College REQUIREMENTS IN THEATRE AND VISUAL ART See pages 84 and 87 for information regarding the performing arts and theatre tracks for the degree in humanities or interdisciplinary studies. Students in theatre ensembles and productions may repeat those courses for credit. No more than six hours in these courses may be used towards a degree. Theatre Minor—Students may select 18 hours from the following courses to complete the minor: No more than 3 total hours in any combination from the following: THE 1011 Stagecraft, THE 1021 Theatre Workshop, THE 1031 Ensemble Acting (Pied Pipers) Additional courses: THE 1103 Beginning Acting, THE 2113 Technical Theatre, THE 3113 Theatre for Young Audiences, THE 3213 Dramaturgy, THE 3303 History of Western Theatre, THE 3313 Oral Interpretation of Literature, THE 3603 Dramatic Criticism, THE 4113 Directing, THE 4143 Theatre and Religion, THE 4813 Senior Writing Project, THE 4893 Internship Visual Art Courses Visual arts courses are open to all students. Enrichment options are built into each course to accommodate advanced students. PHILOSOPHY AND INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES (INS, PHI) MISSION STATEMENT Interdisciplinary programs are the result of profound changes taking place across the spectrum of academic disciplines. Advances in science and technology, along with realities such as globalization and multiculturalism, make it clear that the boundaries between the traditional disciplines are not as distinct as once thought. It is now widely acknowledged that higher education must prepare students to think critically and creatively across traditional boundaries, to operate effectively in cross-cultural environments, and to navigate the interrelationships of different disciplines. Toward this end, the Department of Philosophy and Interdisciplinary Studies includes opportunities to study in more than one academic field within the same degree, and opportunities to develop a philosophical foundation through an “Interdisciplinary Core” designed to explore the relationships between the disciplines chosen. The department also provides opportunities for students to experience and explore diverse cultures through their academic programs. The goal of the Department of Philosophy and Interdisciplinary Studies is to enable students to explore the value and depths of a liberal arts education in diverse and creative ways which will prepare them for a lifetime of high quality study and service in the vocation of the their choosing. ACADEMIC OPPORTUNITIES The Bachelor of Science and Arts in Interdisciplinary Studies allows students to combine two or more areas of study into one degree. The different areas of study are tied together by a specifically designed Interdisciplinary Core. The Interdisciplinary options also include a specifically designed degree plan for students interested in preparing for medical school, law school or pursuing options in other disciplines in the liberal arts. There is also an option for a self-designed Honors Program for qualifying students. CAREER OPPORTUNITIES More than ever, professional employers and many post-baccalaureate academic programs seek graduates that have a diverse background in the liberal arts and the skills to think critically, communicate effectively, and develop broadly. For this reason, the diversity of a degree in Interdisciplinary Studies uniquely prepares a student for a number of different career and vocational pursuits. With the right combination of concentrations, the degree plan is especially designed for students interested in preparing for medical school, law school, or graduate school in philosophy, religion, theatre, or other liberal art fields. In addition, this degree plan offers students with professional interests an opportunity to develop a broad intellectual resource base as well as the reasoning, speaking, and writing skills sought by many employers. Rochester College Page 73 Page 74 Rochester College DEGREE REQUIREMENTS BS with Interdisciplinary Studies Major with a concentration in Pre-Med. Allows students to incorporate a concentration specifically designed for Medical School and MCAT preparation into an Interdisciplinary degree. BS IN INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES WITH A CONCENTRATION IN PRE-MED BS with Interdisciplinary Studies Major with a concentration in Pre-Physician Assistant. Allows students to incorporate a concentration specifically designed for PA programs into an Interdisciplinary degree. REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BS IN INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES WITH A CONCENTRATION IN PRE-PHYSICAN’S ASSISTANT General Education Core 42 General Education Core 42 Interdisciplinary Studies Core 6 Interdisciplinary Studies Core 6 PHI 2013 Introduction to Philosophy 3 PHI 2013 Introduction to Philosophy 3 Any Upper-Division PHI course 3 PHI 3000+ Course 3 Pre-Med Concentration 48 Pre-PA Concentration 38 BIO 1014 Biological Science I (satisfies gen. ed. science) 4 BIO 1014 Biological Science I (satisfies gen. ed. science) 4 BIO 1024 Biological Science II 4 BIO 2114 Human Anatomy and Physiology I 4 BIO 3324 Microbiology 4 BIO 2124 Human Anatomy and Physiology II 4 BIO 3414 Genetics 4 BIO 2313 Nutrition 3 CHE 1514 College Chemistry I 4 BIO 3324 Microbiology 4 CHE 1524 College Chemistry II 4 CHE 1514 College Chemistry I 4 CHE 2514 Organic Chemistry I 4 CHE 1524 College Chemistry II 4 CHE 2524 Organic Chemistry II 4 CHE 2514 Organic Chemistry I 4 CHE 3514 Biochemistry I 4 PSY 2013 or PSY 2223 3 PHS 2014 General Physics I/Lab 4 MAT 1334 Pre-Calculus (Calc I suggested) 4 PHS 2024 General Physics II/Lab 4 *Depending on PA school a 3000 level Physiology course may also be required. MAT 2514 Calculus and Analytic Geometry I (recommended) 4 Second Area of Concentration—must include at least 12 upper-division hours, and be selected from the following options: Business (BS only) Mathematics (BS only) Music Performing Arts International Studies Pre-Law Religion History Performing Arts Theatre International Studies Pre-Law Literature & Writing Literature Professional Writing Literature & Writing Literature Music Professional Writing (BS only) Electives (May need more upper division) TOTAL FOR INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES MAJOR Rochester College 24 Psychology (BS only) Communication Theatre Mathematics (BS only) Religion History Business (BS only) Psychology (BS only) Communication 24 Second Area of Concentration—must include at least 9 upper-division hours, and be selected from the following options: (BS only) Electives (May need more upper division) 8 18 TOTAL FOR INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES MAJOR 128 128 Page 75 Page 76 Rochester College BA/BS with Interdisciplinary Studies Major Allows students to select two areas of study from several degree concentrations with emphases in liberal arts and sciences. The Interdisciplinary core is designed to help students develop a philosophical foundation which will be useful in understanding, comparing and integrating different disciplines of study and different aspects of the human experience. REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BA/BS IN INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES General Education Core 49 Interdisciplinary Studies Core 15 PHI 2013 Introduction to Philosophy 3 Six hours of upper-division PHI courses 6 Any upper-division course from another liberal arts area not including courses from the first and second concentration. General education hours may not be used to meet this requirement. 3 PHI 4813 Senior Project in Interdisciplinary Studies (If one of the selected concentrations has a capstone course, an additional liberal arts course may be substituted.) 3 Interdisciplinary Studies Major First Area of Concentration. Must include at least 8 upper-division hours, and be selected from the following options: 24 General Science (BS only) Literature & Writing Professional Writing History Mathematics (BS only) Religion International Studies Music 1. New students must have a minimum ACT score of 27 or a minimum SAT score of 1200, and must have graduated from high school with a GPA of 3.5 or higher and/or be in the top ten percent of their graduating class. 2. Transfer students or continuing Rochester students who wish to enroll in this degree can use their college performances as criteria. They must have completed at least 30 hours of college credit with a minimum GPA of 3.2, with at least two faculty recommendations. 3. In order to receive this Honors degree, students must graduate with a minimum GPA of 3.4. If the student’s final GPA is below 3.4, then the “Honors” distinction will be dropped from the degree, and the student’s program will be considered under the normal Rochester College academic guidelines, and count as a normal BA in Interdisciplinary Studies. Once the above criteria are met, the student must submit a proposal for his/ her self-designed program, meeting the requirements outlined below. Proposals must be outlined on the “Proposal/Rationale Form” (available in the Department of Interdisciplinary Studies), and must be submitted to and approved by a committee consisting of: the Head of the Department of Interdisciplinary Studies, the vice president of academic affairs and/or academic dean, and one other appropriate faculty member that the committee will select. This process must be completed before 60 hours of credit is completed. Theatre Literature BA in Interdisciplinary Studies with Honors Allows qualified students the opportunity to significantly design their own degree plan in line with specific interdisciplinary interests. The program gives qualified students a tremendous level of flexibility to pursue specific interests and to explore the creative possibilities of Interdisciplinary Studies. For a student to qualify, the following criteria must be met: Pre-Law (BS only) Second Area of Concentration. Must include at least 8 upper-division hours, and be selected from the following options. Note: Pre-med has a specialized first concentration. The second concentration should be taken from this list. Business (BS only) Literature & Writing Pre-Law General Science (BS only) Mass Communication Professional Writing (BS only) (BS only) History Mathematics (BS only) Psychology (BS only) International Studies Music Religion Literature Performing Arts 24 Theatre Foreign Language (BA only) 8 Electives 8-16 TOTAL FOR INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES MAJOR 128 Rochester College Page 77 Page 78 Rochester College INTERDISCIPLINARY CONCENTRATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BA IN INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES WITH HONORS General Education Core Business Concentration 49 24 PHI 2013 Introduction to Philosophy Any upper-division PHI courses Any upper-division course from another liberal arts area not including courses from the first and second concentration. General education hours may not be used to meet the requirement. 3 PHI 4813 Senior Project in Interdisciplinary Studies 3 Foreign Language 6 -8 Self-Designed Program (At least 42 hours of the self-designed program must be upper-division hours.) 128 3 3 3 3 MKT 2503 Principles of Marketing 3 56 TOTAL FOR INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES WITH HONORS 3 MGT 2603 Principles of Management 6 Choose one: BUS 2403 Macroeconomics BUS 2413 Microeconomics FIN 3203 Principles of Finance 3 3 BUS 3303 Business Law 15 3 BUS 3003 Business Communication Interdisciplinary Studies Core ACC 2113 Accounting I ACC 2123 Accounting II Honors students are encouraged to choose as many upper-division classes in the general education categories as possible. General Science Concentration MINORS Philosophy Minor—Requires 18 hours of PHI coursework, including PHI 2013. International Studies Minor—Requires participation in one of Rochester College’s international programs through Global Educational Opportunities (GEO); at least six hours of the same foreign language; at least six hours of liberal arts courses taken in a GEO international program; three hours (cannot overlap with one’s major core or Gen Ed) from BIB 4013, 4123; BUS 3033; COM 3533; HIS 3313, 3323, 4323; three hours (cannot overlap with one’s major core or Gen Ed) from ENG 2413, 4413; GEO 3113; HIS 3423; MIN 2401/2/3; MUS 3333; PHI 3003, 3043, 3923. Rochester College Page 79 24 Select one Laboratory Science sequence (another sequence must be included in the General Education core): BIO 1014 and 1024 Biological Science I and II CHE 1514 and 1524 College Chemistry I and II PHS 2014 and 2024 General Physics I and II 8 Choose 16 hours: BIO 1124 Zoology BIO 2114 Human Anatomy and Physiology I BIO 2124 Human Anatomy and Physiology II BIO 2224 Introductory Botany and Zoology BIO 3114 Botany BIO 3213 General Ecology BIO 3324 Microbiology BIO 3414 Genetics CHE 2514 Organic Chemistry I CHE 2524 Organic Chemistry II CHE 3514 Biochemistry I NSC 2204 Natural Science Field Study PHS 3004 Astronomy NSC 3114 Earth’s Waters NSC 4612 Senior Seminar NSC 4901, 4902, or 4903 Special Topics in Science Laboratory Science sequence from above 16 Page 80 Rochester College Literature Concentration History Concentration Choose three: HIS 1313 Western Civilization to 1500 HIS 1323 Western Civilization, 1500 to Present HIS 2513 United States History to 1877 HIS 2523 United States History, 1877 to Present Choose five: HIS 2113 Michigan History HIS 3313 The French Revolution and Napoleonic Era HIS 3323 Nineteenth-Century Europe HIS 3423 Emerging Nations HIS 3503 Women in American History HIS 3513 History of American Foreign Relations HIS 3523 Colonial and Revolutionary America HIS 3533 The Early American Republic HIS 3543 The Rise of Industrial America HIS 3553 America in World Crises HIS 3813 Historical Research and Writing HIS 4323 Europe in the Age of World Wars HIS 4333 Europe since 1945 HIS 4513 The American Civil War Era HIS 4523 Recent America, 1952 to Present HIS 4613 Selected Topics in History HIS 4813 Senior Project in History 24 24 3 Choose two: ENG 3213 or 3223 British Writers to 1800 OR 1800 to Present ENG 4203 Shakespeare 6 Choose one: ENG 3313 or 3323 American Writers to 1865 OR 1865 to Present 3 Choose two: ENG 4713 Studies in Genre: Novel ENG 4723 Studies in Genre: Short Story ENG 4733 Studies in Genre: Poetry ENG 4743 Studies in Genre: Drama THE 3213 Dramaturgy 6 ENG 4533 Senior Writing Project 15 3 Choose one: ENG 2413 World Literature Survey ENG 4413 Pluralism in American Literature 9 ENG 3513 Critical Writing and Literary Analysis 3 Literature and Writing Concentration 24 ENG 3513 Critical Writing and Literary Analysis Six hours of liberal arts taken at a GEO international program (requires participation in one of Rochester College’s GEO international programs) Choose two from: BIB 4013 Biblical Archaeology BIB 4123 Archaeology of Biblical Tamar in Israel BUS 3033 International Business COM 3533 Intercultural Communication HIS 3313 The French Revolution and Napoleonic Era HIS 3323 Nineteenth-Century Europe HIS 4323 Europe in the Age of World Wars HIS 4333 Europe since 1945 Choose six hours from: ENG 2413 World Literature ENG 4413 Pluralism in American Literature GEO 3113 World Regions HIS 3423 Emerging Nations MIN 2401/2/3 Missions Outreach Internship MUS 3333 World Music PHI 3003 Worldviews and Cultures PHI 3043 African Philosophy & the African-American Experience PHI 3923 World Religions Rochester College 6 Page 81 3 3 3 ENG 4533 Senior Writing Project 6 3 Choose one: ENG 3523 Creative Writing ENG 4523 Advanced Composition 6 3 Choose one: ENG 4713 Studies in Genre: Novel ENG 4723 Studies in Genre: Short Story ENG 4733 Studies in Genre: Poetry ENG 4743 Studies in Genre: Drama THE 3213 Dramaturgy 6 3 Choose one: ENG 2113 Approaches to Grammar ENG 3613 Introduction to Linguistics Minimum of six hours of the same foreign language Choose one: ENG 2413 World Literature Survey ENG 4413 Pluralism in American Literature Choose one: ENG 3213 or 3223 British Writers to 1800 OR 1800 to Present ENG 4203 Shakespeare 24 3 Choose one: ENG 3313 or 3323 American Writers to 1865 OR 1865 to Present International Studies Concentration 3 Page 82 Rochester College Mass Communication Concentration 24 Performing Arts Concentration1 24 COM 3013 Communication Theory 3 MUS 1213 Theory I 3 COM 3513 Small Group Communication 3 MUS 1223 Theory II 3 COM 3533 Intercultural Communication 3 MUE 3423 Production of the School Musical 3 MED 2013 Introduction to Mass Communication 3 MED 2613 Introduction to Public Relations 3 MED 3003 Media and Society 3 3 Choose 6 hours of MED courses 6 Choose one from: MUE 3403 Conducting MUE 3603 Technology in Music MUS 3313 History of Western Music I MUS 3323 History of Western Music II MUS 3333 World Music MUS 3343 Music in America THE 1103 Acting I 3 THE 1113 Movement and Dance2 3 THE 2103 Acting II 3 Choose one from: THE 3213 Dramaturgy THE 3303 History of Western Theatre THE 3313 Oral Interpretation of Literature THE 3603 Dramatic Criticism THE 4113 Directing 3 Mathematics Concentration 24 MAT 1334 Pre-Calculus 4 MAT 2514 Calculus and Analytic Geometry I 4 MAT 2524 Calculus and Analytic Geometry II 4 MAT 3534 Calculus and Analytic Geometry III 4 MAT 3614 Linear Algebra 4 MAT 3624 Differential Equations 4 1 If Music is the student’s other concentration in the Interdisciplinary Studies program, the student must take 3 additional hours of ensemble and/or applied music and 3 additional hours in upper division music courses to complete the music concentration. Students entering with Advanced Placement credit in Calculus must take six hours of the following: MAT 2233, 2413, 3303, or 4653. Music Concentration If Theatre is the student’s other concentration in the Interdisciplinary Studies program, the student may elect to take ENG 4203 Shakespeare and/or an additional 3 hours in THE 1011, 1021, 1031, or 1041 as part of the 18hour block of core courses in the theatre concentration. 24 MUS 1211 Ear Training I and MUS 1213 Theory I 4 MUS 1221 Ear Training II and MUS 1223 Theory II 4 Choose 4 hours: MUS 1101-1171 Music Ensemble (2 hours) MUS 10x1-40x1 Private Instruction (voice, piano, guitar, strings, woodwinds or brass) (2 hours) 4 Choose 6 hours MUS 3313 History of Western Music I MUS 3323 History of Western Music II MUS 3333 World Music MUS 3343 Music in America Choose 6 hours MUS at the 3000 or 4000 level: Any musicology courses listed above MUE 3403 Conducting MUE 3423 Production of the School Musical MUE 3603 Technology in Music MUS 4213 Arranging and Scoring Rochester College 2 The appropriate number of hours of study at an approved dance studio with certified instructors may fulfill this requirement. Pre-Law Concentration 24 BUS 3303 Business Law HIS 3533 Early American Republic 3 POS 2043 Criminal Law and Procedure 3 POS 4013 American Constitutional Law 3 POS 4213 Substantive Criminal Law 3 POS 4913 Directed Legal Research Page 83 3 POS 2023 Introduction to the American Legal System 6 3 MED 4113 Media Law 6 3 3 Page 84 Rochester College Pre-Med Concentration 48 BIO 1014/1024 Biological Science I & II BIO 3324 Microbiology 4 BIO 3414 Genetics 4 CHE 1514/1524 College Chemistry I & II 8 CHE 2514/2524 Organic Chemistry I & II 8 CHE 3514 Biochemistry I 4 PHS 2014/2024 General Physics I & II 8 MAT 1334 Pre-Calculus or MAT 2514 Calc I (recommended) Professional Writing Concentration 8 4 Pre-Physician’s Assistant Concentration 24 ENG 2113 Approaches to Grammar ENG 3513 Critical Writing and Literary Analysis 3 ENG 3523 Creative Writing 3 ENG 3613 Introduction to Linguistics 3 ENG 4523 Advanced Composition 3 ENG 4533 Senior Writing Project 3 Choose 3 hours from: MED 2513 Media Writing OR MED 1101 Print Journalism MED 1201 Digital Journalism 3 Choose one from: MED 2613 Introduction to Public Relations MED 3513 Public Relations Writing and Visual Design 38 3 3 BIO 1014 Biological Science I 4 BIO 2114/2124 Human Anatomy and Physiology I & II 8 BIO 2313 Nutrition 3 Psychology Concentration BIO 3324 Microbiology 4 PSY 2013 General Psychology 3 CHE 1514/1524 College Chemistry I & II 8 CHE 2514 Organic Chemistry I 4 Choose one: PSY 2113 Psychology of Adjustment PSY 2223 Life Span Development 3 PSY 2013 or PSY 2223 Gen. Psych or Life Span Development 3 MAT 1334 Pre-Calculus (MAT 2514 Calc I suggested) 4 Choose one: PSY 3013 Psychology of Personality PSY 3093 History and Systems of Psychology 3 PSY 3033 Abnormal Psychology 3 Choose four courses from the following (at least three must be PSY): Any PSY Or choose from SOC 2013, 2023, 2033, SWK 2013, 3003, 3103 12 *Depending on PA school a 3000 level Physiology course may also be required. Rochester College Page 85 Page 86 24 Rochester College Religion Concentration 24 DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION (PED) BIB 3000 or above Textual 6 MISSION STATEMENT REL 2983 Biblical Interpretation 3 Choose one: REL 3793 Theology I REL 3893 Special Topics in Historical Theology 3 The Department of Physical Education trains students to excel in team and individual athletics, develop lifetime fitness and mental wellness habits, and practice lifesaving techniques such as CPR and first aid. REL 4003 Theology II 3 Choose 9 hours from any MIN or REL 9 ACADEMIC OPPORTUNITIES Theatre Concentration 24 Physical education courses and varsity sports meet the general education requirement. They may be taken more than once for additional credit in subsequent semesters. A maximum of one credit per varsity sport is permitted each academic year. CAREER OPPORTUNITIES No more than 3 hours from the following: THE 1011 Stagecraft THE 1021 Theatre Workshop THE 1031 Ensemble Acting (Pied Pipers) THE 1041 Theatre Practicum 3 Choose six from: THE 1103 Acting I THE 1113 Movement and Dance1 THE 2103 Acting II THE 2113 Technical Theatre THE 3113 Theatre for Young Audiences THE 3213 Dramaturgy THE 3303 History of Western Theatre THE 3313 Oral Interpretation of Literature THE 3603 Dramatic Criticism THE 4113 Directing THE 4143 Theatre and Religion 18 Choose one: THE 4813 Senior Writing Project THE 4893 Internship 3 Graduates with backgrounds in Physical Education may become elementary or secondary school teachers and coaches, physical therapists, athletic trainers, aerobics instructors, personal trainers, sports managers, and recreation directors. 1 The appropriate number of hours of study at an approved dance studio with certified instructors may fulfill this requirement. Rochester College Page 87 Page 88 Rochester College DEPARTMENT OF RELIGION AND BIBLE (BIB, GRE, HEB, MIN, REL) REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BS IN BIBLICAL STUDIES General Education Core 1 The Department of Religion and Bible provides formal instruction in biblical and religious studies. It seeks to encourage all students to pursue Christian faith, values, and service, and offers preparation for graduate studies or a vocation in Christian ministry. 49 Biblical Studies Major MISSION STATEMENT 45 The Bachelor of Science degree supports formal preparation for Christian ministry or biblical studies. Rochester College also offers a Masters of Religious Education degree, and this program is described in a separate graduate catalog. Undergraduate degrees are available in biblical studies, Christian ministry, and youth and family ministry. A concentration in religion is available under the Interdisciplinary Studies program for those who are interested in vocational ministry or a degree plan that does not include biblical languages. Minors are offered in biblical studies, biblical languages, religion, or youth and family ministry. CAREER OPPORTUNITIES Graduates are well-prepared for several roles in Christian ministry. Common ministerial opportunities include preaching, local ministry, youth ministry, missions, and teaching. Graduates also find jobs at Christian youth camps and senior care facilities. The degree provides a foundation for graduate studies in religion. 15 Choose one: BIB 4193 History and Theology of the Old Testament BIB 4293 History and Theology of the New Testament 3 GRE 1214 Elementary Greek I 4 GRE 1224 Elementary Greek II 4 MIN 3323 Introduction to Preaching 3 MIN 4533 Seminar in Ministry 3 REL 2983 Biblical Interpretation 3 REL 3793 History and Theology of the Christian Tradition I ACADEMIC OPPORTUNITIES BIB 3000 or 4000 level textual with both Old and New Testament courses included (3 hours must be 4000 level) 3 REL 3893 Special Topics in Historical Theology 3 REL 4811 Senior Seminar in Religion 1 REL 4003 History and Theology of the Christian Tradition II 3 Language Track: choose one DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 7 -8 BS with Biblical Studies Major Greek Language Track Foundational courses feature textual Bible, historical and doctrinal religion, Hebrew, and Greek. The biblical studies major provides maximum flexibility in course selection for students with a variety of interests including those who plan to seek biblical studies at the graduate level or teach religion at a Christian institution. This major also benefits students who want to increase their Bible knowledge while engaged in liberal arts studies at the Bachelor’s degree level. GRE 3314 Intermediate Greek Grammar 4 Choose one for 3 hours: GRE 3413 Advanced Greek Readings I GRE 3423 Advanced Greek Readings II 3 Hebrew Language Track HEB 1214 Elementary Hebrew I 4 HEB 1224 Elementary Hebrew II 4 Minor (recommended) 18 Electives 8 -9 TOTAL FOR BIBLICAL STUDIES MAJOR 128 1 In the Christian Values unit of general education, Religion/Bible majors must take REL 1003, REL 1013, MIN 2513, and PHI 2013 or 2933. PSY 2013 is required in the Human Institutions and Behavior section. Rochester College Page 89 Page 90 Rochester College BS with Christian Ministry Major Students may earn the Bachelor of Science degree with a major in Christian ministry. This degree program includes a strong foundation in textual, historical, and doctrinal courses, along with both practical and theoretical courses pertaining to local ministry and the art of preaching. BS with Youth and Family Ministry Major Students may earn the Bachelor of Science degree with a major in Youth and Family Ministry. This degree program is designed to prepare students to minister to youth in their families, churches, schools, and communities. REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BS IN YOUTH AND FAMILY MINISTRY REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BS IN CHRISTIAN MINISTRY General Education Core 1 General Education Core 1 49 Christian Ministry Major 51 Youth and Family Ministry Major 54 GRE 1214 Elementary Greek I GRE 1224 Elementary Greek II MIN 3323 Introduction to Preaching MIN 3423 Issues in Culture and Evangelism MIN 3523 Practical Issues in Ministry MIN 3613 Counseling for Ministers MIN 3623 The Church and Society MIN 4533 Seminar in Ministry MIN 4873 Internship REL 2983 Biblical Interpretation REL 3793 History and Theology of the Christian Tradition I REL 3893 Special Topics in Historical Theology REL 4811 Senior Seminar in Religion REL 4003 History and Theology of the Christian Tradition II 3 Minor (recommended) 18 Electives 10 TOTAL FOR CHRISTIAN MINISTRY MAJOR 128 1 In the Christian Values unit of general education, Religion/Bible majors must take REL 1003, REL 1013, MIN 2513, and PHI 2013 or 2933. PSY 2013 is required in the Human Institutions and Behavior section. Page 91 3 1 REL 4003 History and Theology of the Christian Tradition II 1 3 REL 4811 Senior Seminar in Religion 3 3 REL 3893 Special Topics in Historical Theology 3 3 REL 3793 History and Theology of the Christian Tradition I 3 3 REL 2983 Biblical Interpretation 3 3 PSY 3213 Adolescent Development 3 3 MIN 4873 Internship 3 3 MIN 4533 Seminar in Ministry 3 3 MIN 3423 Issues in Culture and Evangelism 3 3 MIN 3363 Family Life Ministry 3 3 MIN 3353 Religion, Media, and Youth Culture 3 4 MIN 3333 Introduction to Youth Ministry 4 4 MIN 3323 Introduction to Preaching 4 9 GRE 1224 Elementary Greek II 9 BIB 3000 or 4000 level textual with both Old and New Testament courses included (3 hours must be 4000 level) GRE 1214 Elementary Greek I BIB 3000 or 4000 level textual with both Old and New Testament courses included (3 hours must be 4000 level) Rochester College 49 3 Minor (recommended) 18 Electives 7 TOTAL FOR YOUTH AND FAMILY MINISTRY MAJOR 128 1 In the Christian Values unit of general education, Religion/Bible majors must take REL 1003, REL 1013, MIN 2513, and PHI 2013 or 2933. PSY 2013 is required in the Human Institutions and Behavior section. Page 92 Rochester College MINORS Biblical Language Minor—Requires GRE 1214, 1224, HEB 1214, 1224, and one additional GRE or HEB. These courses, if used toward a Biblical Language Minor, cannot be concurrently applied toward the Biblical Studies, Christian Ministry, or Youth and Family Ministry degree cores. Students in those programs must use upper-division BIB, MIN, PHI, or REL coursework to substitute for redundant requirements. Biblical Studies Minor—Requires REL 2983 and 15 hours of BIB 3000 (or above) level textual courses. Greek Minor—Requires GRE 1214, 1224, 3314, 3413, and 3423. These courses, if used toward a Greek Minor, cannot be concurrently applied toward the Biblical Studies, Christian Ministry, or Youth and Family Ministry degree cores. Students in those programs must use upper-division BIB, MIN, PHI, or REL coursework to substitute for duplicate requirements. Religion Minor—Requires REL 2983 and 15 hours of upper-division religion courses (BIB, GRE, HEB, MIN, PHI, REL). Youth and Family Ministry Minor—Requires MIN 3333, 3353, 3423, 3613; PSY 2013, 3213. DEPARTMENT OF SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS (BIO, CHE, MAT, NSC, PHS) MISSION STATEMENT The Department of Science and Mathematics exists to provide Biology, Chemistry, Natural Science, Physics, and Mathematics courses that introduce students to the tremendous complexity and diversity found in all living things, and to the elements of the physical world in which they live. The Department strives to enhance each student’s appreciation for God’s wisdom in His works of creation and in the function of the biological and physical world. It also encourages an awareness of humanity’s relationship with all creation, and the need for the responsible stewardship of natural resources. In Mathematics courses, the Department seeks to increase the quantitative skills of students, to train them to think logically in preparation for other courses and situations in which mathematics occurs, and to increase their confidence in their ability to do mathematics. ACADEMIC OPPORTUNITIES The Department of Science offers majors in Integrated Science, Health Sciences (with tracks in pre-pharmacy and pre-physical Therapy), Biology, and Biology Education. Also, Biology, Chemistry, Natural Science, and Physics courses meet general education core requirements for all degrees at Rochester College. General Science, Pre-Med, and Pre-Physician Assistant concentrations are available to students majoring in Interdisciplinary Studies. A General Science, Biology, Biology Education, or Chemistry minor may be combined with any academic major. The following options are available for students who are interested in studying mathematics at Rochester College. Students may certify to teach mathematics at the elementary or secondary level. Students may also pursue a Bachelor of Science degree in interdisciplinary studies and select mathematics as a concentration. This option allows students to study mathematics and a second academic field such as behavioral science, business, communication, history, or music. Students may pursue a Bachelor’s degree through another department and select mathematics as a minor. CAREER OPPORTUNITIES Graduates with a background in science may play essential roles in several science-related fields such as education, medicine, pharmacy, veterinary science, engineering, environmental biology, environmental science, and other scientific fields. Many careers require analytical and critical thinking skills taught in mathematics. The importance of mathematics in many academic and professional fields means that many professionals must utilize mathematical skills on a regular basis. With a background in mathematics, students may pursue a wide range of career options in such fields as business, government service, industry, and teaching. Students may also choose to continue their studies with graduate work in such fields as computer science, economics, mathematics, or statistics. Rochester College Page 93 Page 94 Rochester College DEGREE REQUIREMENTS BS with Biology Major Students with a variety of science related interests and goals may choose the biology major. The degree forms a solid background for science related graduate work such as further studies to prepare for professions in the medical, research or environmental fields. REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BS IN BIOLOGY REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BS IN HEALTH SCIENCES 54 General Education Core General Education Core 1 54 Biology Major 37-38 BIO 1014 Biological Science I 4 BIO 1024 Biological Science II 4 BIO 2114 Anatomy and Physiology I 4 BIO 2124 Anatomy and Physiology II 4 BIO 3114 Botany or BIO 3213 General Ecology BS with Health Sciences Major Designed for students interested in pursuing studies at either a Pharmacy or Physical Therapy School, this degree will provide the essential background and requirements to enter these health related programs. Students should consult the requirements of the specific programs to which they are interested in applying. NSC 4612 Senior Seminar 4 PHS 2014 Physics I 2 4 BIO 3414 Genetics 4 8 BIO 3324 Microbiology 4 HEALTH SCIENCES TRACK: Choose one Pre-Pharmacy Track 26 BIO 1024 Biological Science II with Lab 18 Additional Required Support Courses 1 8 TOTAL FOR BIOLOGY MAJOR 10-11 128 1 MAT 1334 Pre-Calculus, CHE 1514 and 1524 College Chemistry I and II, CHE 2514 Organic Chemistry I, and PHS 2024 General Physics II are required support courses for the Biology major. Nine hours of the support courses can satisfy general education requirements. MINORS General Science Minor—Requires eight hours of BIO lab courses, eight hours of CHE, NSC, or PHS lab courses; and two hours of any BIO, CHE, NSC, or PHS. Biology Minor—BIO 1014, 1024, 3324, and 3414. Choice of: BIO 2013, 2114 or 3213. 4 CHE 2514 and 2524 Organic Chemistry I & II 8 CHE 3514 Biochemistry I 4 MAT 2413 Elementary Statistics 3 MAT 2514 Calculus and Analytic Geometry I 4 BUS 2403 or 2413 Macro- or Microeconomics Minor Electives 24 4 BIO 2114 and 2124 Human Anatomy and Physiology I & II 4 NSC 3114 Earth’s Waters 8 BIO 1014 Biological Science I with Lab 4 CHE 3514 Biochemistry I CHE 1514 / 1524 Pre-Pharmacy Track (gen. ed. science) they intend to transfer.) 4 BIO 3414 Genetics 8 Health Sciences Major (Students are advised to check requirements of the school to which 3 -4 BIO 3324 Microbiology CHE 1314 / 1324 Pre-PT Track (gen. ed. science) OR 3 OR Pre-Physical Therapy Track 13-14 PHS 2024 Physics II 4 PSY 2223 Life Span Development 3 PSY 3303 Psychological Stats (WSU) or MAT 2413 Stats (OU) 3 Exercise Physiology - upper division (Transfer In) 4 18 Chemistry Minor—CHE 1514, 1524, 2514, 2524, and 3514. Minor Mathematics Minor—Requires 12 hours of MAT above 1103, including MAT 2514 and 2524, and six hours of upper-division MAT. Electives (depending on track chosen) 6-19 TOTAL FOR HEALTH SCIENCES MAJOR 128 Rochester College Page 95 Page 96 Rochester College ADMISSION TO THE PROGRAM SCHOOL OF NURSING (NUR) To gain admission to the RN to BSN program, students must supply the following: MISSION STATEMENT • Completed Rochester College Nursing School Application The mission of the Rochester College School of Nursing is to prepare professional nurses in an academically challenging Christian community to provide socially conscious and professionally skilled practice in a diverse and rapidly changing health care environment. The curriculum is designed to enhance students’ understanding of health and illness in the context of a Christian environment using the relationship-based care model. • Official transcripts of all college work • A copy of an unencumbered RN license valid in the State of Michigan • A one-page letter describing the student’s career plans and philosophy of nursing care. Include in this a statement of how your spiritual values impact your clinical practice. ACADEMIC OPPORTUNITIES • Two completed reference forms (along with waiver), one from current employer and one personal reference The RN to BSN (Bachelor of Science in Nursing) completion program presents an opportunity for students to gain access into higher education. Faculty will facilitate the students’ growth, both individually and collectively, by providing opportunities for students to make connections with mentors within areas that hold a particular interest to the student. The RN’s previous academic and clinical preparation is valued and built upon with a concentration in applicable nursing advancement. All of these items should be sent to: Susan Griffin, Nursing Program Coordinator Rochester College 800 West Avon Road Rochester Hills, MI 48307 CAREER OPPORTUNITIES The nursing program provides BSN completion students the opportunity to explore career options in various areas both within the hospital setting and in the surrounding community. Students will advance their understanding of the nursing profession and expand their leadership potential in the areas of management and health education within the community. More than ever, employers recognize the value of baccalaureate-prepared RNs. This degree commonly offers graduates career opportunities beyond the bedside. DEGREE REQUIREMENTS Students applying for the RN to BSN degree completion program must have graduated from an ADN (Associate Degree in Nursing) program or diploma school and have a current license as a Registered Nurse in Michigan. The course offerings for degree are presented primarily in an online format. Length of time to completion of the program will be evaluated during a degree planning session, based on the student’s previous academic background and availability to take classes. If the courses are taken in the prescribed manner, the BSN degree can be completed in as little as two years. Rochester College Page 97 Page 98 Rochester College DEGREE REQUIREMENTS BS with Nursing Major REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BS IN NURSING General Education Core 1 25 Co-requisite Courses 2 24 RN Degree (ADN) 30 Nursing Major DIVISION OF BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONAL STUDIES 39 NUR 3104 Transitions to Professional Nursing 4 NUR 3204 Advanced Health Assessment/Communication 4 NUR 3304 Pathophysiology Across Cultures 4 NUR 3404 Integrated Pharmacology Trends 4 NUR 4104 Nursing Research & Informatics 4 NUR 4204 Holistic Health Promo Across Life 4 NUR 4304 Nursing Management & Leadership 4 NUR 4904 Nursing Capstone/Practicum 4 PHI 4944 Ethics for Health Care 4 REL 1003 Introduction to the Christian Faith 3 Electives 10 TOTAL FOR NURSING MAJOR 128 1 PSY 2013 General Psychology is required as part of the gen ed core. 2 Co-requisite courses include CHEM 1314 and 1324 Intro to Chemistry I and II; BIO 1014 Biological Science w/lab; BIO 2011/2013 Intro to Anatomy/Physiology w/lab; BIO 2313 Nutrition; BIO 3324 Microbiology; INF 1011 Information Literacy; PSY 1001 APA Writing; and PSY 2223 Life Span Development. Four hours of the science support courses can satisfy general education lab science requirements. Rochester College Page 99 Page 100 Rochester College ! MISSION STATEMENT The mission of the Department of Business is to prepare young men and women for lives of ethical service and professional achievement in a competitive world. We achieve this mission by providing a challenging and innovative business program to compliment a liberal arts education in an environment that reflects Christian principles and high moral and ethical standards. Must complete the Business Core courses listed above with a minimum CGPA of 2.50 or higher. ! DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS (ACC, BUS, CIS, FIN, HRM, MGT, MKT, SMG) Completed the Personal Background and Professional & Educational Goals sections of the portfolio Application Process 1. Obtain the Application for Admission to the Department of Business form from your academic advisor. 2. Return application to the Business Department Chair located in Muirhead Center room 130 before the appropriate deadline. ACADEMIC OPPORTUNITIES Deadlines for Applications: Students who seek the Bachelor of Business Administration degree may choose a major in accounting, interdisciplinary management (specific concentrations in management, marketing, human resources, and finance), or sports management. The BBA provides a broad base of business training and the opportunity to focus on a particular discipline. A business concentration is also available under the Bachelor of Science degree in interdisciplinary studies. Minors in business, management, marketing, human resources, finance, and sports management are also available for most majors. CAREER OPPORTUNITIES The Rochester College BBA pays big dividends. Whether it’s at a Fortune 500 multinational or a small business, professionals who hold the BBA are wellprepared to succeed in modern business. A required business internship provides practical development and useful network contacts that lead to the right job after graduation. Fall – Monday after Thanksgiving Spring – Second Monday of April 3. The Admissions Subcommittee will review all candidates. All applicants will be notified of their admission status through a letter from the Department of Business. Enrollment Prior to Application Processing In order to register for upper-level business courses before your application has been fully processed, you must complete a Conditional Agreement to Register. This form may be obtained from your academic advisor. DEGREE REQUIREMENTS Business Core - All Business majors are required to take the business core in addition to their major or concentration course requirements. Admission to the Department of Business Business Core All students seeking a degree with a major in business must apply for and be admitted to the Department of Business. This process is separate from and in addition to the general admittance to Rochester College. ACC 2113/2123 Accounting I & II 6 BUS 2403/2413 Macro and Microeconomics 6 The following must be documented at the time of application: BUS 3003 Business Communication 3 BUS 3033 International Business 3 BUS 3303 Business Law 3 BUS 4813 Internship 3 BUS 4823 Business Strategy and Policy 3 BUS 4943 Ethics in Business 3 FIN 3203 Principles of Finance 3 MAT 2413 Elementary Statistics 3 MGT 2603 Principles of Management 3 MKT 2503 Principles of Marketing 3 ! ! Minimum cumulative CGPA of 2.50 for all course work completed prior to application. (Transfer students: for purposes of admission to the School of Business, all grades from previous institutions will be calculated in the cumulative grade point average.) Completed a minimum 54 hours, including the following courses: o o o o o o o o o MGT 2603 Principles of Management MKT 2503 Principles of Marketing BUS 3003 Business Communication BUS 2403 Macroeconomics BUS 2413 Microeconomics ACC 2113 Accounting I ACC 2123 Accounting II MAT 1103 Intermediate Algebra (or any higher level MAT) MAT 2413 Statistics Rochester College Page 101 Page 102 42 Rochester College BBA with Accounting Major Students may choose a specialized career path in the accounting field. Options include preparation for the Certified Managerial Accountant Exam, Internal Auditor Exam, or continued education for the Certified Public Accountant Exam. Select one of the following concentrations: Marketing Management Concentration 15 MKT 3533 Consumer Behavior 3 MKT 3543 Integrated Marketing Communications 3 MKT 3553 Marketing Research 3 MKT 3613 Customer Relationship Management 3 MKT 4513 Marketing Management 3 REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BBA IN ACCOUNTING General Education Core 46 Business Core (as defined on previous page) 42 Accounting Major 27 ACC 3113/3123 Intermediate Accounting I & II 6 ACC 3143 Cost Accounting 3 ACC 3213 Auditing 3 ACC 3223 Managerial Accounting 3 ACC 3313 Taxation 3 ACC 4133 Advanced Accounting 3 ACC 4223 Accounting Seminar 3 ACC 4313 Accounting Theory 3 Human Resource Management Concentration 15 HRM 3643 Labor Relations 3 HRM 3653 Leadership Theory 3 HRM 3663 Training and Development 3 HRM 4003 Compensation Management 3 PSY 3123 Social Psychology 3 Financial Management Concentration 15 FIN 3213 Financial Markets 3 FIN 3243 Investment Management 3 FIN 3253 Risk Management 3 FIN 4003 Corporate Finance 3 13 TOTAL FOR ACCOUNTING MAJOR 3 FIN 3223 Bank and Financial Institution Management Electives 128 BBA with Interdisciplinary Management Major Prepares students to achieve a high level of success in entry-level business jobs. Management students benefit from a broad base of accounting, economics, marketing, and management. Students will complete a general management concentration and then select from one of three other concentrations in marketing management, finance management or human resource management. Electives TOTAL FOR MANAGEMENT MAJOR 7 128 REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BBA IN INTERDISCIPLINARY MANAGEMENT General Education Core 49 Business Core (as defined on previous page) 42 Management Concentration (required) 15 MGT 3603 Organizational Behavior 3 MGT 3683 Small Business and Entrepreneurship 3 MGT 3703 Management Information Systems 3 MGT 3613 Human Resource Management 3 MGT 3713 Operations Management 3 Rochester College BBA with Sports Management Major Prepares students for careers in fitness center management, sports public relations, recreation management, sports promotions, sports marketing, event management, and commercial/professional sports administration. Page 103 Page 104 Rochester College DEPARTMENT OF TEACHER EDUCATION (EDU, RDG) REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BBA IN SPORTS MANAGEMENT General Education Core 49 MISSION STATEMENT Business Core (as defined on page 102) 42 Sports Management Major 27 The mission of the teacher education program at Rochester College is to prepare teachers with Christian values who can effectively serve in the diverse and challenging schools and global communities of the twenty-first century. Graduates of the program are teachers of understanding because they have gained a rich liberal arts education, acquired specialized knowledge in academic content areas, and completed a Professional Studies program. They are teachers with integrity because they have developed Christian values and high ethical standards. Lastly, they have hearts to serve because they have developed the attitudes and dispositions necessary to act as change agents in the diverse and challenging schools and communities in the twenty-first century. SMG 2223 Principles and Practices of Sports Administration 3 SMG 2263 Managing Sports Organizations 3 SMG 3003 Sports Marketing 3 SMG 3283 Practicum in Sports Management 3 SMG 4003 Budget and Finance in Sports 3 SMG 4113 Legal Aspects of Sports 3 SMG 4253 Facility Design and Event Management 3 Choose two from the following: SMG 3013 History and Philosophy of Sports SMG 3023 Recreation Management SMG 3033 Theory in Coaching SMG 3613 Emerging Issues in Sports Management SMG 3623 Special Topics in Sports SMG 4243 Ethics in Sports 6 ACADEMIC OPPORTUNITIES Rochester College is authorized by the Michigan Department of Education to recommend teacher candidates to the state for certification. Candidates for Elementary Certification may major in one or more of the following content areas: Integrated Science Education, Language Arts Education, Elementary Math Education, and Social Studies Education. Secondary candidates may receive certification in one or more of the following content areas: Biology Education, English Education, History Education, Secondary Math Education, and Social Studies Education. CAREER OPPORTUNITIES Electives 10 TOTAL FOR SPORTS MANAGEMENT MAJOR 128 Graduates who receive Elementary Certification may teach all subject areas in grades K-5 or in their major content areas in grades 6-8, and all subject areas in grades K-8 in self-contained classrooms. Graduates who receive Secondary Certification may teach in grades 6-12 in their major and/or minor content areas. MINORS PROFESSIONAL CERTIFICATION Available for all non-business majors and for business majors depending on the student’s particular major or concentration. Since the process of becoming a teacher includes both a baccalaureate degree and professional certification, students must declare their intent as early as possible in order to plan with an education advisor. The advising process is a critical aspect of teacher preparation; for example, with some courses, it is possible to meet both General Education and Teacher Education requirements at the same time. Management Minor—Requires the following 18 hours: MGT 2603, 3603, 3613, 3683, 3703 and 3713. Marketing Minor—Requires the following 18 hours: MKT 2503, 3533, 3543, 3553, 3613 and 4513. Human Resource Minor—Requires the following 18 hours: MGT 2603; HRM 3643, 3653, 3663, 4003; and PSY 3123. Finance Minor—Requires the following 18 hours: FIN 3203, 3213, 3223, 3243, 3253, and 4003. Business Minor—Requires the following 18 hours: ACC 2113; BUS 2403; HRM 3653; MGT 2603, 3613; and MKT 2503. Sports Management Minor—Requires the following 18 hours: SMG 2223, 2263, 3003, 3283, 4113 and 4253. Rochester College Page 105 Page 106 Rochester College Elementary Major Secondary Major Minor Biology x x English x x History x Integrated Science x Language Arts x Mathematics x x Social Studies x x • Passing of the MTTC (Michigan Test for Teacher Certification) Basic Skills Tests in reading, writing, and mathematics and submission of scores to the Teacher Education Office. • Submission of two evaluations to be completed by faculty in two of the following areas: education, major or minor area. • Completion of an interview with the Education Admission Committee. • Successful field placement evaluations from EDU 2201 Introduction to Education Field Experience and EDU 2241 Educational Psychology Field Experience. • Compliance with all standards expected of the Rochester College campus community, as outlined in the Student Handbook and the College Catalog. x Education advisors ensure that students have met all teacher preparation requirements, and work with each student to plan appropriate progress toward the completion of the majors and minors. Students who wish to pursue other content area majors and minors recognized by MDE should contact an education academic advisor to determine the best way to complete requirements. Endorsements in the content areas listed above are offered to post baccalaureate students seeking teacher certification. Post baccalaureate students must also meet all of the MDE’s Standards, Rules, and Guidelines for Elementary and Secondary Provisional Certification. Students must complete the college’s Christian Values requirement, a teachable major and/or minor and all coursework and field experiences in the Professional Studies component. The Professional Studies component consists of 39 semester hours of coursework and field experiences that recognize the continuum of professional development from novice to master teacher. This component is offered in four sequentially structured phases that guide prospective teachers through the preservice levels of the teaching profession. ADMISSION TO THE TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM All students seeking Michigan Provisional Teacher Certification must apply for and be admitted to the teacher education program. The following must be documented at the time of application: • Completion of 60 hours with a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.70, with no grade below a "C" in the major, minor, and professional studies. • Satisfactory completion of EDU 2202 Introduction to Education and EDU 2243 Educational Psychology with a minimum grade of C. The application package will be reviewed by the Admission Subcommittee. All recommended candidates for admission to the Teacher Education Program will be reviewed and approved by the Advisory Council at their meetings in December and May. Candidates will be notified of admission status through a letter from the Education department chair. The application package deadline for the fall semester is the Monday after Thanksgiving. The spring semester deadline is the second Monday of April. Admission is valid for six years; however, changes mandated by the Michigan Department of Education may impose additional requirements during that time period. Student Teaching Student teaching is often considered the most exciting and demanding aspect of the Teacher Education Program. It is the final field experience; therefore, it is the doorway into the teaching profession. Prospective employers place a premium on the successful completion of student teaching. The field placement sites for student teaching are established in the Methods and Assessment Strategies courses. With the approval of the mentor teacher and Coordinator for Student Teaching, placement for Assessment Strategies will also be the student teaching placement. This requires completing the application process two semesters prior to student teaching. The following requirements must be met prior to placement in the assessment strategies course: • • • Criteria for admission to the Teacher Education Program include: Submission of an Application for Methods and Assessment Strategies and Student Teaching Placement. Evidence of academic competency by a cumulative grade point average of 2.70 overall, in professional studies, and in the major and the minor, with no grade lower than a “C.” Demonstration of standards expected of the Rochester College campus community, as outlined in the Student Handbook and the College Catalog. • Completion of an Application for Admission to Teacher Education. • Demonstration of competency in writing. • Submission of a completed Criminal Record Disclosure. Rochester College Page 107 Page 108 Rochester College Before beginning the student teaching experience, teacher candidates must complete the following: • • • All courses and field experiences in professional studies (with the exception of EDU 4721/4821 Seminar), general education, the major and minor. Successful completion of all field experiences. The 60-hour field experience corresponding to the appropriate methods and assessment strategies course weighs heavily. Applicable subject area test(s) of the Michigan Test for Teacher Certification (MTTC). REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BS WITH ELEMENTARY EDUCATION CERTIFICATION RECOMMENDATION General Education Core (some major/minor courses may satisfy gen ed req) 33-49 Content Area Major 31-44 Professional Studies Core 39 EDU 2202 Introduction to Education 2 EDU 2201 Introduction to Education Field Experience 1 Applicants for admission to student teaching are reviewed and approved by the Teacher Advisory Council. EDU 2243 Educational Psychology 3 DEGREE REQUIREMENTS EDU 2241 Educational Psychology Field Experience 1 BS with Elementary Education Certification Recommendation Students may seek teacher certification at the elementary level. In addition to completing a content area major, students must complete the professional studies core and elementary education minor. EDU 2262 Classroom Technology 2 EDU 2283 Ethics and Philosophy of Education 3 EDU 3223 Classroom Teaching Strategies 3 EDU 3221 Classroom Teaching Strategies Field Experience 1 EDU 3243 Teaching Exceptional Students 3 EDU 3262 Teaching Across Cultures 2 EDU 3271 Teaching Across Cultures Field Experience 1 EDU 4253 Classroom Management Strategies 3 EDU 4282 Foundations of Education 2 EDU 4721 Student Teaching Seminar 1 EDU 4728 Student Teaching 8 RDG 4303 Reading Foundations 3 Elementary Education Minor 28 EDU 2303 Fine Arts for the Elementary Teacher 3 EDU 3313 Social Studies Foundations 3 MAT 2213/2223 Math for Elementary Teachers I & II 6 NSC 2314 Science Foundations I 4 NSC 2324 Science Foundations II 4 RDG 3324 Foundations of Language Arts 4 RDG 4314 Content Reading and Assessment 4 TOTAL FOR DEGREE Rochester College Page 109 Page 110 128-160 Rochester College BS with Elementary Math Education Major Students may seek teacher certification at the elementary level with the Elementary Math Education major. Students choose the Elementary Education minor. REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BS IN ELEMENTARY MATH EDUCATION BS with Integrated Science Education Major Students may seek teacher certification at the elementary level with the Integrated Science Education major. Students choose the Elementary Education minor. REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BS IN INTEGRATED SCIENCE EDUCATION General Education Core (some major/minor courses may satisfy gen ed req) 33 General Education Core (some major/minor courses may satisfy gen ed req) 33 Elementary Math Education Major 31 Integrated Science Education Major1 44 MAT 1334 Pre-Calculus 4 BIO 1014 Biological Science I 4 MAT 2213 Math for Elementary Teachers I 3 BIO 1024 Biological Science II 4 MAT 2223 Math for Elementary Teachers II 3 BIO 2013 Introduction to Human Anatomy and Physiology 3 MAT 2233 Finite Mathematics 3 BIO 2224 Introductory Botany and Zoology 4 MAT 2413 Elementary Statistics 3 CHE 1514 College Chemistry I 4 MAT 2514 Calculus and Analytic Geometry I 4 CHE 1524 College Chemistry II 4 MAT 3333 Algebraic, Proportional, and Mathematical Reasoning 3 NSC 1004 Earth Science with Lab 4 MAT 3343 Geometry and the Elementary Teacher 3 NSC 3114 Earth’s Waters 4 MAT 4503 Methods/Assessment Strategies Elem. Math Ed. 3 NSC 4503 Methods/Assessment Strategies in Science Ed. 3 MAT 4952 Senior Math Seminar 2 NSC 4612 Senior Seminar 2 Elementary Education Minor 22 PHS 2014 General Physics I 4 Professional Studies 39 PHS 2024 General Physics II 4 Electives 3 128 20 Professional Studies 39 TOTAL FOR INTEGRATED SCIENCE EDUCATION MAJOR TOTAL FOR ELEMENTARY MATH EDUCATION MAJOR Elementary Education Minor 136 1 MAT 1334 Pre-Calculus is a required support course for the Integrated Science Education major. Rochester College Page 111 Page 112 Rochester College BS with Language Arts Education Major Students may seek teacher certification at the elementary level with the Language Arts Education major. Students choose the Elementary Education minor. BS with Social Studies Education Major Students may seek elementary teacher certification with the Social Studies Education major. Students choose the Elementary Education minor. REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BS IN SOCIAL STUDIES EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BS IN LANGUAGE ARTS EDUCATION General Education Core (some major/minor courses may satisfy gen ed req) 30 General Education Core (some major/minor courses may satisfy gen ed req) 30 Language Arts Education Major 36 Social Studies Education Major 39 COM 3013 Communication Theory 3 BUS 2403 Macroeconomics 3 COM 3533 Intercultural Communication 3 BUS 2413 Microeconomics 3 ENG 2113 Approaches to Grammar 3 GEO 1013 Introduction to Geography 3 ENG 2413 World Literature Survey 3 GEO 3113 World Regions 3 ENG 3613 Introduction to Linguistics 3 HIS 1313 Western Civilization to 1500 3 ENG 4523 Advanced Composition 3 HIS 1323 Western Civilization 1500 to Present 3 MED 3003 Media and Society 3 HIS 2113 Michigan History 3 RDG 3313 Children’s Literature 3 HIS 2513 United States History to 1877 3 RDG 3333 Writing Workshop 3 HIS 2523 United States History 1877 to Present 3 RDG 3413 Adolescent Literature 3 HIS 4503 Methods/Assessment Strategies Social Studies Ed (for Elementary Education) 3 RDG 4503 Methods/Assessment Strategies Language Arts Ed 3 POS 2013 National Government 3 THE 3113 Theatre for Young Audiences 3 POS 2023 Introduction to the American Legal System 3 POS 3013 The U.S. in the Modern World 3 Elementary Education Minor 24 Professional Studies 39 TOTAL FOR LANGUAGE ARTS EDUCATION MAJOR 129 Page 113 25 Professional Studies 39 TOTAL FOR SOCIAL STUDIES EDUCATION MAJOR Rochester College Elementary Education Minor 133 Page 114 Rochester College BS with Secondary Education Certification Recommendation Students may seek teacher certification at the secondary level. In addition to completing a content area major and minor, students must complete the professional studies core. REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BS IN BIOLOGY EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BS WITH SECONDARY EDUCATION CERTIFICATION RECOMMENDATION General Education Core (some major/minor courses may satisfy gen ed req) 1 General Education Core (some major/minor courses may satisfy gen ed req) 43-49 Content Area Major 37-43 Professional Studies Core EDU 2262 Classroom Technology EDU 2283 Ethics and Philosophy of Education EDU 3223 Classroom Teaching Strategies EDU 3221 Classroom Teaching Strategies Field Experience EDU 3243 Teaching Exceptional Students 3 EDU 3262 Teaching Across Cultures 2 EDU 3271 Teaching Across Cultures Field Experience 1 EDU 4253 Classroom Management Strategies 3 EDU 4282 Foundations of Education 1 EDU 4828 Student Teaching 3 3 4 4 3 4 2 8 RDG 4403 Literacy in Secondary Schools 4 2 EDU 4821 Student Teaching Seminar 4 NSC 4612 Senior Seminar 1 4 NSC 3114 Earth’s Waters 3 4 BIO 4603 Methods/Assessment Strategies in Biology Ed. 3 BIO 1024 Biological Science II BIO 3414 Genetics 2 4 BIO 3324 Microbiology 1 BIO 1014 Biological Science I BIO 3213 Ecology 3 EDU 2241 Educational Psychology Field Experience 40 BIO 2224 Introductory Botany and Zoology 1 EDU 2243 Educational Psychology Biology Education Major BIO 2124 Anatomy and Physiology II 2 EDU 2201 Introduction to Education Field Experience 52 BIO 2114 Anatomy and Physiology I 39 EDU 2202 Introduction to Education BS with Biology Education Major Students may seek teacher certification at the secondary level. In addition to completing a content area major, students must complete the professional studies core and a subject area minor from English, history, or mathematics. Content Area Minor TOTAL FOR SECONDARY EDUCATION DEGREE Rochester College Content Area Minor 24-27 Professional Studies 39 TOTAL FOR BIOLOGY EDUCATION MAJOR 155-158 1 Includes MAT 1334 Pre-Calculus, CHE 1514 and 1524 College Chemistry I and II, and PHS 2024 General Physics II are required support courses for the Biology Education major. Biology Education Minor—Requires BIO 1014, 1024, 2013, 2224, 3324, and 3414. 22-27 146-161 Page 115 Page 116 Rochester College BS with English Education Major Students may seek teacher certification at the secondary level with the English Education major. Students will choose a subject area minor from biology, history, or mathematics. REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BS IN ENGLISH EDUCATION BS with Secondary Math Education Major Students may seek teacher certification at the secondary level with the Secondary Math Education major. Students may choose a subject area minor from biology, English or history. REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BS IN SECONDARY MATH EDUCATION General Education Core (some major/minor courses may satisfy gen ed req) 40 General Education Core (some major/minor courses may satisfy gen ed req) 44 English Education Major 43 Secondary Math Education Major 37 ENG 2113 Approaches to Grammar 3 MAT 2233 Finite Mathematics 3 ENG 2413 World Literature Survey 3 MAT 2413 Elementary Statistics 3 ENG 3513 Critical Writing and Literary Analysis 3 MAT 2514 Calculus and Analytic Geometry I 4 ENG 3613 Introduction to Linguistics 3 MAT 2524 Calculus and Analytic Geometry II 4 ENG 4413 Pluralism in American Literature 3 MAT 3303 Modern Algebra 3 ENG 4523 Advanced Composition 3 MAT 3534 Calculus and Analytic Geometry III 4 ENG 4533 Senior Writing Project 3 MAT 3614 Linear Algebra 4 ENG 4811 Senior Seminar 1 MAT 3624 Differential Equations 4 ENG 3213 or 3223 British Writers to 1800 or 1800-Present 3 MAT 4603 Methods/Assessment Strategies Secondary Math Ed. 3 ENG 3313 or 3323 American Writers to 1865 or 1865-Present 3 MAT 4653 College Geometry 3 MAT 4962 Senior Math Seminar 2 Choose one: ENG 4713 Studies in Genre: Novel ENG 4723 Studies in Genre: Short Story ENG 4733 Studies in Genre: Poetry ENG 4743 Studies in Genre: Drama 3 ENG 3000 or above Literature 3 ENG 3000 elective, from any course except ENG 3533 3 RDG 3413 Adolescent Literature 3 ENG 4603 Methods and Assessment Strategies in English Education 3 Content Area Minor 23-27 Professional Studies 39 TOTAL FOR SECONDARY MATH EDUCATION 143-147 Secondary Mathematics Education Minor—MAT 2233, 2413, 2514, 2524, 3303 or 3624, 3614, 4653. Content Area Minor 23-27 Professional Studies 39 TOTAL FOR ENGLISH EDUCATION MAJOR 145-149 English Education Minor—Requires ENG 2113, 2413, 3513, 3613, 4413, 4523; three hours from ENG 3213, 3223, 3313, or 3323; and three hours from ENG 4713, 4723, 4733, or 4743. Rochester College Page 117 Page 118 Rochester College BS with Social Studies Education Major Students may seek teacher certification at the secondary level with the Social Studies Education major. Students may choose a subject area minor from biology, English, history or mathematics. DEPARTMENT OF MASS COMMUNICATION (GFX, MED, RTB) MISSION STATEMENT REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BS IN SOCIAL STUDIES EDUCATION General Education Core (some major/minor courses may satisfy gen ed req) 37 Social Studies Education Major 36 BUS 2403 Macroeconomics 3 BUS 2413 Microeconomics 3 GEO 1013 Introduction to Geography 3 GEO 3113 World Regions 3 HIS 2113 Michigan History 3 HIS 3423 Emerging Nations 3 HIS 3503 Women in American History 3 HIS 3000+ Upper Division History Elective 3 HIS 4603 Methods/Assess Strategies in Soc. Studies Education 3 POS 2013 National Government 3 POS 2023 Intro to the American Legal System 3 POS 3013 US in the Modern World 3 ACADEMIC OPPORTUNITIES The Bachelor of Science in Mass Communication is offered with tracks in Broadcasting, Graphic Design and Public Relations. The Broadcasting and Graphic Design tracks provide students with a unique educational opportunity through a partnership between Rochester College and Specs Howard School of Broadcast Arts. The Broadcasting track incorporates the technical training in either radio and/or video production at Specs Howard School with in-depth explorations of theory and scholarship in media at Rochester College. The curriculum is designed to help students expand their understanding of communication, and develop essential skills needed to succeed and advance within the media industry. Broadcasting students also gain supervised field experience in a radio or television internship. Content Area Minor 23-24 Professional Studies 39 TOTAL FOR SOCIAL STUDIES EDUCATION MAJOR 135-136 NOTE: If History Education minor is not selected, these required support courses must also be taken: HIS 1313, 1323, 2513 and 2523. History Education Minor (Non-social studies major)—Requires HIS 1313, 1323, 2113, 2513, 2523, 3423, 3503, 3603 and three hours additional from HIS 3000+. History Education Minor (Secondary social studies major)—Requires HIS 1313, 1323, 2513, 2523, and 12 hours additional from HIS 3000+. Rochester College The mission of the Department of Mass Communication is to enable students to think critically and to communicate clearly, effectively and ethically. The department is committed to helping students strive for great thoughts, meaningful interaction and powerful communication. Department courses and programs promote the intersection of faith and learning, acquainting students with the ways modern philosophies and popular thinking coincide and/or conflict with Christian thought. Page 119 The Graphic Design track trains students in the fields of graphic and web design at Specs Howard School combined with thorough study and analysis of media at Rochester College. The curriculum will help students think critically and communicate clearly, effectively and ethically. This unique combination will prepare students for work in graphic design, which is a growing field with the advent of interactive websites, podcasting, Internet streaming and other cutting edge technologies. At Specs, students learn the theory and history of design combined with typography, branding, packaging, digital imaging, interactive and web design using Adobe Creative Suite. Graphic Design students also gain supervised field experience in an internship. The Public Relations track prepares graduates for work as communication specialists with businesses and organizations. This program prepares students to skillfully manage the many different tasks that a public relations professional handles, ranging from communication strategy, media relations, writing and designing news releases, newsletters and other publications to planning special events. Students who major in public relations take selected courses related to media, marketing and communication. They also gain practical public relations experience in Public Relations Campaigns and Strategies class, where they develop and implement a PR plan and portfolio for a real-world client. Students also gain supervised field experience in a public relations internship. Page 120 Rochester College Minors are offered in media and public relations. Study in either of these areas is a valuable complement to other academic programs. A mass communication concentration also is offered in the interdisciplinary studies program. CAREER OPPORTUNITIES Broadcasting students will be prepared for careers in many areas of the broadcast and communication industries, including on-air talent, producers, writers, editors, camera operators, video technicians, etc. Graphic design students can enter many areas of the design field, including layout artists, prepress managers, web designers, flash designers and multimedia designers. Public Relations graduates will be equipped to work as public relations professionals for a variety of organizations, including corporations, nonprofits and agencies. Students desiring to further their formal education will be well prepared for the rigors of graduate school. STUDENT PUBLICATIONS Faculty in the Mass Communication Department train and oversee students in preparation and production of The Shield, RC’s student magazine, and the online version of The Shield. Working in these areas offers students the opportunity to use their creative talents in producing publications while at the same time helping them gain valuable media experience. Joining The Shield staff allows students to participate in the complete production of a magazine and a web site. These pieces are written, edited and designed by students for the campus community. Mass Communication majors are encouraged to write and design for The Shield, and students from other majors are welcome to participate as well. Scholarships are available to students who work as editors. How to get involved: Even with no experience in publication work, students who have an interest in writing, design or photography are encouraged to volunteer for The Shield. Students will be trained and advised by faculty so that they can obtain these valuable skills. In addition to serving as a campus voice for students, another benefit gained from working on The Shield is that students create work for their portfolios, which can be used in the future when applying for internships and jobs. Students can enroll in MED 1101 Print Journalism, or MED 1201 Digital Journalism, which are hands-on workshop classes devoted to publishing. broadcast majors, this component of the curriculum includes the Radio and Television Broadcasting course with either the radio or video concentration. Twenty-four semester hours will be awarded by Rochester College to the student for completion of this curriculum component. Students may also pursue the Radio and Television Broadcasting course with both the radio and video concentrations, otherwise referred to as the Comprehensive Course. Thirty-six semester hours will be awarded by Rochester College to the student for completion of this curriculum component. For Graphic Design students, 24 hours will be awarded by Rochester College to the student for completion of this curriculum component, which includes one year of training through Specs Howard in the basics of print and web design utilizing Adobe Creative Suite. Students must have approval from Rochester College’s business office no less than 15 days prior to enrollment in courses at Specs Howard. The student enrolled at Rochester College is allowed to apply for financial aid only through Rochester College, according to federal guidelines. However, students who have been admitted to Specs Howard School of Broadcast Arts are required to adhere to all conditions, policies, and rules of Specs Howard School. Students pursuing the Public Relations track will complete all coursework at Rochester College. REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BS IN MASS COMMUNICATION General Education Core 46 Mass Communication Major 30 COM 2223 Public Speaking 3 COM 3013 Communication Theory 3 MED 2013 Introduction to Mass Communication 3 MED 2513 Media Writing 3 MED 3003 Media and Society 3 MED 3113 New Media Strategies 3 ACADEMIC CRITERIA MED 3323 Research Methods in Media 3 Mass Communication majors must earn a C in all required departmental courses. If students earn a C- or below in a required course they must repeat the course. MED 4113 Media Law 3 DEGREE REQUIREMENTS MED 4893 Internship 3 BS with Mass Communication Major Provides students with in-depth explorations of theory and scholarship in media, as well as a choice of a track in Broadcasting, Graphic Design or Public Relations. MED 4943 Media Ethics 3 Students pursuing the Bachelor of Science in Mass Communication with the Broadcasting or Graphic Design tracks at Rochester College will take coursework offered by Specs Howard School of Broadcast Arts as part of the curriculum requirements for that degree during either their sophomore or junior year. For Broadcasting Track (Specs Howard) Rochester College Page 121 Choose one track: 24 RTB 1116 Broadcasting I 6 RTB 1126 Broadcasting II 6 Page 122 Rochester College Choose one production emphasis: RTB 1216 Radio Production I 6 RTB 1226 Radio Production II REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BS IN MASS COMMUNICATION – MEDIA AND COMMUNICATION ARTS 6 General Education Core Mass Communication Major or RTB 1316 Video Production I 39 COM 2223 Public Speaking 6 3 COM 3013 Communication Theory 6 RTB 1326 Video Production II 40 3 COM 3533 Intercultural Communication Graphic Design Track (Specs Howard) GFX 1314 Branding/Photoshop GFX 1414 Flash/Dreamweaver/Package Design GFX 1514 Web Design/Motion Graphics GFX 1614 Portfolio Design/Compositing COM 3513 Small Group Communication COM 3533 Intercultural Communication 3 MED 2613 Introduction to Public Relations 3 MED 3513 Public Relations Writing and Visual Design 3 MED 4323 Public Relations Campaigns and Strategies 3 MKT 2503 Principles of Marketing 3 MKT 3533 Consumer Behavior 3 3 3 MKT 3543 Integrated Marketing 3 MED 4943 Media Ethics 3 3 MED 4893 Internship Public Relations Track 3 MED 4953 Media Seminar and Portfolio 4 3 MED 3513 PR Writing and Visual Design 4 3 MED 3323 Research Methods in Media 4 3 MED 3113 New Media Strategies 4 3 MED 3003 Media and Society 4 3 MED 2513 Media Writing 4 GFX 1214 Perspectives of Design/InDesign MED 2013 Introduction to Mass Communication MED 4113 Media Law GFX 1114 Fundamentals of Design/Illustrator 3 Media & Communication Arts Track from Macomb Community College 46 Electives 3 TOTAL FOR MASS COMMUNICATION – MACA MAJOR Minor (recommended) 18 Electives 10 TOTAL FOR MASS COMMUNICATION MAJOR 128 128 MINORS Media Minor—Requires 18 hours of MED courses. Public Relations Minor—Requires MED 2513, 2613, 3513, 4323 and 6 additional hours of MED. Rochester College Page 123 Page 124 Rochester College BS with Technical and Professional Studies Major This program allows students to incorporate technical training from another institution (e.g. from a certificate program) into a degree in professional studies. DEPARTMENT OF TECHNICAL AND PROFESSIONAL STUDIES TECHNICAL DEGREE OPTIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BS IN TECHNICAL AND PROFESSIONAL STUDIES The Bachelor of Science (BS) degree with a major in technical and professional studies allows students to incorporate technical training from another institution (a certificate program) into a Bachelor’s degree. In effect, any completed technical certificate (from an approved institution) that carries 24-50 semester hours can serve as one of the concentrations in this degree program. Only “official” certificate programs from approved institutions will be accepted as part of this major. (Note: Up to 11 hours of the certificate program may be used for upper-division requirements, if necessary.) General Education Core 49 Liberal Arts Core 15 Whenever possible, students interested in this degree plan should complete all other degree requirements at Rochester College and then pursue the technical training as a block. If the student is entering an approved certificate program and has informed the Department of Business and Professional Studies, then it is not necessary to complete 24 of the last 36 hours at Rochester College (as stipulated on page 55). Students may choose to take classes at another institution to meet the technical part of their degree while co-enrolled at Rochester College. In such a case the student must work out all of the issues related to scheduling, financial aid, full-time status, and sports eligibility. Below is a list of some of the technical certificate programs that are available at recognized institutions such as Macomb Community College and Oakland Community College. This list simply represents some available options; these institutions may adjust their programs and offerings. Courses completed for this core must be divided among at least three liberal arts areas, not including courses from the first and second areas of concentration. General education hours may not be used to meet this requirement. Nine of the fifteen hours must be Upper-Division. Professional Studies Major hours will vary 1 First Area of Concentration : at least 24 hours. Must include at least 8 UpperDivision hours, and be selected from the following concentration options: Business Mathematics Religion Mass Communication Professional Writing Psychology General Science Second Area of Concentration: at least 24 hours. This concentration must be selected from recognized certification programs of recognized technical training institutions. See the department director for a list of available options. Electives hours will vary TOTAL FOR TECHNICAL AND PROFESSIONAL STUDIES MAJOR 128 At Macomb Community College: Architectural Drawing Automobile Technology Civil Technology Climate Control Technology Construction Technology Culinary Arts/Hospitality Electronics Technology EMT (paramedic, fire fighting) Fire Science Law Enforcement Media and Communication Arts Medical Assistant / Surgical Tech. Quality Systems Technology Tool Fixture and Die Design 1 Refer to page 77 for Professional concentration requirements. At Oakland Community College: Automotive Servicing Computer Aided Design / Drafting Computer Aided Engineering Tech. Comp. Hardware Engineering Tech. Conference and Court Reporting Criminal Justice Electrical Trades Technology Electronic Technology Rochester College Exercise Science and Technology Fire Fighter Technology Gerontology Landscape Design / Horticulture Library Technical Assistant Machine Tool / Welding Tech. Pharmacy Technology Photographic Technology Page 125 Page 126 Rochester College CENTER FOR EXTENDED LEARNING (CEL) The mission of the Center for Extended Learning is to extend the mission of Rochester College by making post-secondary education available to the adult learner. This education is characterized by academic excellence, life relevance, and Christian foundation. OVERVIEW PROGRAM FEATURES The Center for Extended Learning (CEL) designs its programs to meet the needs and schedules of adult learners. Courses in the accelerated Bachelor’s degree completion programs and accelerated Associate of Arts program are available on evenings, weekends, online, or by directed study. The CEL distinguishes adult learners from traditional students, who immediately go to college after high school. While the CEL and traditional program share the same objectives, the CEL program is tailored to fit the unique needs of the non-traditional student. The CEL faculty consists of full-time instructors along with working professionals who share their professional experience on a part-time basis. All instructors present their courses from a Christian perspective. DEGREE OPPORTUNITIES The CEL offers degree completion programs at Rochester College’s main campus in Rochester Hills, the Macomb Community College University Center in Clinton Township, the Mott Community College University Center in Flint, and the Specs Howard School of Broadcast Arts in Southfield. For more information, call the CEL at 248.218.2222. CAMPUS OFFERINGS (Degree specifics can be found on the following pages) Main Campus Degree Completion Program Offerings: Error! Bookmark not defined. • Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA) with Management or Marketing track • Bachelor of Science (BS) with Biblical Studies major • BS with Counseling Psychology major • BS with Early Childhood Studies major • Associate of Arts Macomb University Center Degree Completion Program Offerings: • Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA) with a Management or Human Resources track • BS with Counseling Psychology major • BS with Early Childhood Studies major • BS in Mass Communication with Media and Communication Arts track • BS with Organizational Leadership and Communication major Rochester College Mott University Center Degree Completion Program Offerings: • BS with Counseling Psychology major • BS with Organizational Leadership and Communication major Specs Howard School of Broadcast Arts Degree Completion: • BS in Mass Communication with Public Relations, Broadcasting, or Graphic Design track • Associate of Arts Page 127 Program Design • Each Bachelor’s degree completion program requires a total of 120 semester hours • Each Bachelor’s degree completion program requires 75 semester hours of foundation credit. This includes general education, technical, occupational, and elective courses. • Each Bachelor’s degree completion core is 45 semester hours. • The AA requires 62 semester hours and may be applied toward foundation requirements for a Bachelor’s degree program. Program Schedules The following accelerated schedule can help CEL students finish their program of study much more quickly than is possible in a traditional program. • Evening and weekend classes meet once per week for 4 hours during an 8week session. • Evening classes usually meet 6-10 p.m. • Saturday classes usually meet 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. or 12:30-4:30 p.m. • Online classes meet over a 9-week period. • Directed Study classes meet a minimum of 3 dates during the semester (see semester schedule). • Each of the three semesters per year consists of two eight-week sessions. Program Length The length of time it takes to finish the CEL program depends on the number of credits the student transfers from other schools and the pace he or she chooses. As few as three hours or as many as 15 hours may be taken each semester. Students who have completed the foundation requirements (see degree requirements) may finish the Bachelor’s degree completion program in as few as 12 months if they assume a full schedule each semester for their specific program. Students may complete the AA degree faster than the normal two year time frame depending on the number of credits they transfer from other colleges and how many courses they take each semester. Students who do not transfer any college credit may complete the AA program in as few as 18 months. Students may enter the AA program to meet Bachelor’s degree foundation requirements, earn the AA degree, or both. Page 128 Rochester College ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS Transfer Policy Rochester College’s Center for Extended Learning (CEL) primarily serves working adult learners by offering an accelerated adult learning program with courses offered in the evenings and on weekends. An adult learner is one whose primary life identity has moved beyond the stage of a traditional student due to life circumstances, experiences, responsibilities, and knowledge that have contributed to their preparation for this program. Meeting the minimum criterion for admission to one of CEL's accelerated degree completion programs indicates a likelihood of success but does not provide a guarantee of success. Success in these programs requires a high level of maturity, commitment, organization, and self-motivation on the part of the student. The CEL accepts traditional transfer credit (C- or higher) from regionally accredited colleges or universities. Up to 47 semester hours may transfer toward an Associate’s degree and up to 90 semester hours may transfer toward a Bachelor’s degree completion program. A maximum of 50% of a Bachelor’s degree major’s core requirement may be transferred to Rochester College. Hours transferred in from other institutions must be completed before the final semester. Official transcripts must be submitted from each previously-attended institution. Regular admission to CEL’s accelerated Bachelor Degree Completion programs is granted to students who have a High School Diploma with a minimum GPA of 2.25 or a GED*, are at least 21 years of age, have three or more years of work experience, and have completed 60 or more credit hours from a regionally accredited college or university with a minimum 2.25 GPA. This may include credits earned through CEL's Associate of Arts degree program. Regular admission to CEL’s accelerated Associate of Arts degree program is granted to students who have a High School Diploma with a minimum 2.25 GPA or a GED*, are at least 21 years of age, and have three or more years of work experience *The minimum GED score prior to 2002 must be at least a 50. Beginning in 2002, the requirement is a minimum total score of 2,250 with no single test score below 410 on all tests in the test battery. Regular admission to the University Center and off-site Degree Completion Programs is granted to graduates of the host institution who have a minimum GPA of 2.25. Students pursuing a degree through the traditional program should consult the Concurrent Enrollment Policy for eligibility to take courses from CEL. Regular admission to the Bachelor of Science in Early Childhood Studies degree completion program requires completion of an Associate’s degree in Early Childhood and current employment in the early childhood field. A prospective student may submit a written petition to the Academic Dean for provisional admission (Academic Alert) if he or she does not meet the regular GPA admission requirements. The written petition must include a rationale for why the applicant believes he/she will succeed in a challenging accelerated adult program. Students who are approved to be provisionally admitted on Academic Alert are limited to 6 hours their first semester. Provisionally admitted students must complete a minimum of 12 semester hours through CEL’s Associate of Arts program with a 2.0 or higher GPA prior to being accepted into a Bachelor’s degree completion program. Completion of 12 or more semester hours at Rochester College with a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.0 will allow the student to be removed from Academic Alert. Rochester College Page 129 Returning Students Returning students who have not been enrolled at Rochester College for more than one year must return under the current degree plan for their program. This may require additional coursework that was not previously required under their old program. ACADEMIC AND GENERAL POLICIES See page 36 for the complete satisfactory academic progress policy. Academic Alert. Academic Alert applies only to students new to Rochester College who are admitted, but who do not meet the unconditional admission requirements due to high school GPA or ACT/SAT Scores. Students on Academic Alert may take no more than 15 credit hours. To achieve normal status, students must earn a CGPA of 2.0 or higher. Students who do not meet the minimum CGPA requirement of 2.0 during the first semester after being admitted on Academic Alert are placed on Academic Probation. Academic Probation: Students on Academic Alert and all other students who do not meet the minimum CGPA requirement of 2.0 are placed on Academic Probation. Students on Academic Probation must take no more than 12 credit hours, and if employed by Rochester College will not be eligible for on-campus work until cleared of academic actions. To be reinstated to normal status, students must improve their CGPA to 2.0 or higher. Students may be continued on Academic Probation if they earn a semester GPA of 2.0 or higher during the semester they are on Academic Probation. Students who do not meet the minimum CGPA requirement of 2.0 the semester after being placed or continued on Academic Probation will then be placed on Academic Suspension. Academic Suspension: Students who do not meet the minimum CGPA requirement of 2.0 the semester after being placed or continued on academic probation or any time after their first four semesters of enrollment are placed on academic suspension. Students who are academically suspended may enroll for up to 6 hours of credit during the suspension semester; however, they are not eligible for financial aid from government or college sources. In order to be removed from academic suspension, the student’s cumulative GPA must be at least 2.0. Academically suspended students must submit a written Page 130 Rochester College appeal letter to the CEL Academic Committee to be permitted to take more than six hours while on suspension. The CEL Academic Committee makes the final decision to accept or reject the appeal. Further details can be obtained from the Academic Services Office or on warriornet.rc.edu. Written appeals must be submitted to the Associate Dean of CEL. Attendance Regular class attendance is a necessary prerequisite for success in college studies. Thus, students are expected to attend classes regularly and punctually. If more than 30 percent of a course is missed for any reason, then it will be necessary to drop the course and take it at another time. Failure to drop a course with more than 30 percent absence will result in a grade of F. NOTE: Only two absences are allowed in an eight week course, but this is not an entitlement, and there are consequences to absences. Christian Values Requirement for Accelerated Degree Programs Religion courses are essential to the degree programs offered by Rochester College. The CEL Christian Values Requirement (CVR) is 6 hours for the Accelerated Associate of Arts Program. There is a minimum of 6 hours for the Accelerated Bachelor’s degree Program, but the total CVR depends on how many hours a student transfers from another college (see the following chart). The minimum CVR is 12 hours for students seeking both the Associate’s and the Bachelor’s degree. NOTE: Courses taken to meet the CVR for the AA degree may not be applied to the minimum CVR for the Bachelor’s degree. Credits Transferred 12 hours 30-59 9 hours 60+ 6 hours Course Load Accelerated programs require a concentrated effort to meet course objectives. The average CEL course load is between nine and 12 hours per semester. Students may take as few as three hours or as many as 15 hours per semester. The Associate Dean of CEL must approve course load that exceeds 15 hours per semester. Concurrent Enrollment Policy This policy impacts students who wish to take courses from both the Center for Extended Learning (CEL) and the traditional program. Note: The designation of "traditional student" or "CEL student" is determined by the college division through which the student is pursuing a degree (i.e. Center for Extended Learning; Rochester College Traditional Students Traditional students must have a 2.0 GPA or higher to be eligible to take CEL courses. Traditional students may take any CEL course from the Associate of Arts program (required or elective general education courses); however, students must complete Composition B prior to taking any other CEL course. Traditional students must receive permission from their advisor and the appropriate department/division chair to take any major core course from one of CEL’s bachelor degree completion programs. Traditional students who take CEL courses will be charged the traditional tuition rate. CEL Students CEL students may take any eligible course from one of the traditional divisions at the traditional tuition rate. Crossover enrollment between the CEL and traditional programs is allowed on a space available basis only. Traditional students taking CEL courses may not displace CEL students from CEL courses and vice versa. Determination regarding available space will be made no later than the day preceding the start of the course(s) in question. Academic Honors Graduates must complete a minimum of 45 semester hours of course work at Rochester College in order to be eligible to graduate with honors (Summa Cum Laude, Magna Cum Laude, or Cum Laude; see page 53). The 45 hours must be actual courses taken at Rochester College, and cannot include credit earned through nontraditional provisions such as testing, professional schools and training, and prior learning portfolio. Religion Requirement 0-29 Traditional Program’s Division of Arts and Humanities or Division of Business and Professional Studies). Page 131 Nontraditional Credit Rochester College recognizes that many people approach higher education with a variety of different experiences and training which has provided knowledge that is equivalent to college level learning; therefore, the College provides non-traditional avenues through which students can receive credit. Avenues for obtaining nontraditional credit at Rochester College include testing services, professional schools and training (30 hours maximum), military training (60 hours maximum), and prior learning portfolio (30 hours maximum). Students may receive a combined maximum of 30 semester hours toward the Associate of Arts degree and 60 semester hours toward a Bachelor’s degree through nontraditional avenues. Credit granted through nontraditional provisions may not count toward the 30-hour residency requirement or the Christian Values Requirement. Credit granted through the submission of portfolios must be completed before the last full semester prior to graduation or the student will not be permitted to graduate. Page 132 Rochester College Note: Portfolio credit from other colleges is not automatically accepted as transfer credit; however, students may submit portfolios completed at other institutions for evaluation by Rochester College faculty. Online / Web-Enhanced Courses Rochester College offers a variety of selected online courses. Online courses serve a two-fold purpose. First, online courses add flexibility in scheduling for adult learners. Secondly, they ensure that graduates have demonstrated their ability to function effectively and productively in the computer environment within their given discipline. Students taking online courses are required to complete an online student tutorial before gaining access to their course. Online courses are nine weeks in length. Students are required to have a computer with a Pentium processor (at least one GHz or faster), with Microsoft Word 2003 (or newer), Internet access, and an email account prior to enrolling in an online course. Students can access online courses through the online learning management system at http://online.rc.edu. Students are expected to participate actively in the online course a minimum of three days each week. All online courses may be accessed any time night or day. Students should allot as much or more total time than a regular classroom course would require. Online courses assume that adult students are able to comfortably navigate the computer environment (if not, CIS 1103 is recommended before taking an online course), be self-directed and require reduced dependence on the instructor for learning while studying course material and fulfilling course requirements. ASSESSMENT REQUIREMENTS Writing Proficiency The objective of the writing proficiency requirement is to aid students in being successful in college coursework while enrolled at Rochester College. To meet this objective, CEL students are required to take Composition A & B during their first full 1 semester at Rochester College. The following policies apply: Transfer of Composition A and/or B: Composition A and/or B with a grade of 2 “C” or higher may be transferred from another institution. AP (Advanced Placement) Credit for Composition A and/or B: An AP (Advanced Placement) score of 3 or 4 will result in the assignment of 3 credits for Composition A. An AP score of 5 will result in the assignment of 3 credits each for Composition A & B. CLEP for Composition A: Successful completion of the CLEP exam, including the written essay, will result in the assignment of 3 credits for Composition A. Condition to waive Composition A: Composition A may be waived and replaced with electives for a score of 25 or above on the ACT English/Writing Test or a score of 570 or above on the writing portion of the SAT Reasoning Test. Grade Requirement for Composition A and/or B: CEL students are required to take Composition A & B during their first full semester at Rochester College unless these courses have been transferred (see transfer section above and footnotes below). A grade of “C” or higher must be earned in Composition A and Composition B or the student will be required to repeat the course and will be restricted to 9 credit hours during the subsequent semester until successfully completed. Capstone Course Each Bachelor’s degree program includes a capstone course. A capstone course is taken after most of a student’s degree requirements have been met and allows a student to demonstrate cumulative knowledge of their chosen field. Students must earn a “C” or higher on the final paper in the capstone course in order to pass the class. Program Evaluation In order to graduate, a student must submit a short program evaluation that measures the student’s perspective of the overall degree program from which they are graduating. The Degree Program Evaluation Form may be obtained from any CEL office and is usually submitted with the graduation application. Residency Requirement Students must complete at least 30 semester hours at Rochester College for the Bachelor’s degree or 15 semester hours for the Associate’s degree. Students must also complete a minimum of 30 of the last 36 semester hours for the Bachelor’s degree or the last 15 semester hours for the Associate’s degree at Rochester College. Registration and Course Drop Deadline Eight-week courses may not be added after the second class meeting. Courses that are dropped after the first class meeting receive a grade of “W” (withdrawal). The last day on which a student may drop a course is the day immediately following the fifth meeting of the course. For directed study, independent study, and online courses, the withdrawal deadline comes 35 calendar days from the start date. After this deadline, courses cannot be dropped and a “W” cannot be assigned. Upper-Division Requirement At least 36 semester hours of upper-division (3000 and 4000 level course numbers) work is required for any Bachelor’s degree. 1 If the student is beginning the CEL program in Session B of a semester and is lacking only Composition B, then the student must take Composition B at that time. If Composition A & B is needed then the student is required to take both the next semester. 2 If a grade of “C” or higher is earned in Composition B and transferred to Rochester College, but a grade of less than “C” is earned in Composition A, then Composition A will be considered fulfilled; however, the credits will not be transferred. In this case another general education course may be taken in its place. Rochester College Page 133 Page 134 Rochester College CEL TUITION AND FEES The tuition and fee structure in the Center for Extended Learning differs from the structure that is used in the traditional program. Differences exist because the costs associated with administering and supporting nontraditional programs are substantially less than those required for the full infrastructure needed to operate and administer a traditional residential campus. Tuition Tuition (per semester hour) ............................................................................... $306 Audit rate (per hour) ............................................................................................ $45 Other Charges and Fees (non-refundable) Application Fee .................................................................................................... $35 Course Change Fee (per change form) .............................................................. $25 Graduation Application Fee , Bachelor’s degree ............................................... $125 Graduation Application Fee, Associate’s degree ........................................ $50 Late Payment Fee ............................................................................................... $35 Late Registration Fee .......................................................................................... $35 New Student Registration Fee (one time only) .................................................. $135 Online Course Fee .............................................................................................. $30 Parking Violation Fee (each violation) ................................................................. $30 Payment Plan Fee (per semester) ...................................................................... $60 Returned Check Fee (NSF, per check) ............................................................... $35 Textbooks .........................................................................................................varies Transcript Fee (per copy) ...................................................................................... $5 Nontraditional Credit Evaluation (non-refundable) CLEP & DANTES Administrative Fee ................................................................. $35 CLEP & DANTES Testing Fee (per examination) ............................................... $77 DANTES Speech Testing Fee (per examination) .............................................. $110 Prior Learning Portfolio Workshop Fee ............................................................... $50 Prior Learning Paper Assessment Fee (per paper) ............................................. $75 CLEP, DANTES, and Non-Traditional Transcription Posting Fee (per credit hour) .............................................................................................. $25 student may contact their financial aid advisor at 248.218.2029. An automatic charge may be established for the semester payment plan; a form will need to be completed and given to the Business Office each semester. PAYMENT OPTIONS Personal Payment Prior to the first day of the semester students may pay all charges remaining after financial aid to avoid service charges and late fees. Employer Reimbursement Students who qualify for employer reimbursement may defer payment up to 5 weeks after the last day of the semester. To qualify for deferred payment, the student’s employer must NOT require proof of payment in full before reimbursement. If proof of payment is required, you may not defer payment, and you must follow one of our other payment options. Students must submit (to the Business Office) their employer reimbursement policy and documentation from their employer that verifies their eligibility. This documentation must be on file for students who have an outstanding balance and would like to register for a subsequent semester. Tuition Voucher If an employer has a policy to pay the college directly, this is referred to as a Tuition Voucher plan. Rochester College requires that the student submit vouchers (or a copy of the application for a tuition voucher) to the Business Office with registration. Documentation must be on file with the business office in order to be eligible to register for subsequent semesters as long as there is an outstanding balance. Semester Payment Plan Students who are unable to pay the full amount due at the time of registration are offered the semester payment plan. Students pay one-third of the total semester bill, after deducting completed financial aid credits, at the time of registration, and the remaining two-thirds in two equal monthly payments due on the dates indicated below. There is a $60 fee per semester for use of the payment plan. Students may be charged a $35 late payment fee if payments arrive after the due date. This option may not be available to students who have a history of late payments or have had a previous Rochester College account placed with a collection agency. Fall Semester GENERAL PAYMENT INFORMATION Rochester College’s continued success in its mission and growth depends on the timeliness of its students’ payments. Rochester College expects accounts to be paid on time according to one of the payment options listed below. All fees are assessed and payable in U.S. dollars. Cash/Check/ Money Order Checks and money orders should be made payable to Rochester College and brought in or mailed to the Business Office. Spring Semester Summer Semester August 20 January 7 April 29 September 20 February 15 May 20 October 20 March 15 June 20 Credit Card Credit card payments may be made in person or, if the student knows the amount due, called in directly to the cashier at 248.218.2053. To find out the amount due, a Rochester College Page 135 Page 136 Rochester College DELINQUENT ACCOUNTS Past Due Accounts Rochester College cannot release transcripts until all accounts are paid in full and Perkins loan payments are current. Students with delinquent accounts (past due 30 days or more) will not be allowed to register. A finance charge of 1.5% (18% APR) is applied monthly to delinquent accounts. Nonpayment of delinquent accounts may result in suspension or placement of the account with a collection agency. Collection Agency Placements Accounts placed with a collection agency will be charged collection costs, and possible legal fees. The payee becomes responsible to the collection agency for all contact and payment arrangements. Readmission to the College will not be permitted until the amount in collections is paid in full. A list of collection agencies used by the College may be found on the Rochester College website. Refunds for Eight-Week Courses On or before the first class meeting 100% After the first and before the second class meeting* 90% After the second and before the third class meeting* 50% After the third and before the fourth class meeting* 25% After the fourth class meeting* 0% *or 7 days following the previous meeting if a week is skipped for any reason. Refunds for Directed Study, Independent Study, and 3-Hour Online Courses On or before the designated start date of the course (as stated on the schedule in the registration packet) 100% 1-6 calendar days following the course start date 90% 7-13 calendar days following the course start date 50% 14-20 calendar days following the course start date 25% 21+ calendar days following the course start date 0% Refunds for 1-Hour Online Courses On or before the designated start date of the course (as stated on the schedule in the registration packet) 100% 1-4 calendar days following the course start date 90% REFUNDS 5-9 calendar days following the course start date 50% The College uses our Academic Refund Policy to calculate tuition refunds for dropped or withdrawn course(s) based on the following tables. Financial Aid adjustments will be calculated based on the Federal Refund Policy. Requests for course drops must be submitted in writing to the CEL Office. Students should remember that financial aid may be affected by changes in course load and the student may be responsible for remaining charges on their account. Therefore, it is important to consult with the Financial Aid and Business Offices before dropping a course. 10-13 calendar days following the course start date 25% 14+ calendar days following the course start date 0% Rochester College Page 137 Page 138 Rochester College CEL ASSOCIATE OF ARTS PROGRAM Provides a foundation for other accelerated programs offered by Rochester College. REQUIREMENTS FOR THE ASSOCIATE OF ARTS DEGREE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BBA IN MANAGEMENT Foundation Credit 75 25 Electives 41 6 Christian Values General Education Core 39 General Education Requirements (Courses listed are offered by CEL. Other courses may satisfy these requirements) ACC 2113/2123 Accounting I and II 6 3 BIB 2213 Life of Christ 3 CIS 1103 Software Applications (or demonstrate proficiency) Any BIB, MIN, or PHI 3 Management Core Communication and Composition 9 33 BUS 3003 Business Communication 3 COM 1013 Communication Basics 3 BUS 3033 International Business 3 ENG 1113 Composition A 3 BUS 3303 Business Law 3 ENG 1123 Composition B 3 BUS 3423 Studies in Economic Issues 3 BUS 4823 Business Strategy and Policy (capstone) 3 Humanities 6 ART 2003 Art Appreciation OR FLM 2013 Film Appreciation 3 BUS 4943 Business Ethics 3 ENG 2413, 3313, or 3323 Literature 3 FIN 3203 Principles of Finance 3 MGT 2603 Principles of Management 3 Science and Mathematics 9 BIO 2313; NSC 1003, 1013, 2204; or PHS 3003 Science 6 MGT 3603 Organizational Behavior 3 MAT 1203 Survey of Mathematics 3 MKT 3513 Studies in Marketing 3 REL 1013 Survey of Biblical Literature 3 Social Science 9 Any HIS or POS 3 Track: choose one Any PSY or SOC 3 Any Social Science 3 General Management Track MGT 3613 Human Resource Management MGT 3653 Leadership Theory MGT 3703 Management Information Systems MGT 3713 Operations Management 12 Human Resource Management Track MGT 3613 Human Resource Management MGT 3643 Labor Relations MGT 3663 Training and Development PSY 3013 Psychology of Personality 12 Marketing Track MKT 3533 Consumer Behavior MKT 3543 Integrated Marketing Communications MKT 3553 Marketing Research MKT 4513 Marketing Management 12 Electives CIS 1103 Software Applications (or demonstrate proficiency) TOTAL FOR ACCELERATED AA DEGREE 23 3 62 Bachelor’s Degree Completion Programs REQUIREMENTS FOR THE GENERAL EDUCATION CORE General Education requirements for the Bachelor’s degree completion programs include: Composition A and B, oral communication, and at least one eligible course from each of the following areas: fine arts, literature, mathematics, science, and a social science. A total of 25 semester hours is required to satisfy the general education requirements. Rochester College Page 139 TOTAL FOR MANAGEMENT MAJOR Page 140 12 120 Rochester College REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BS IN BIBLICAL STUDIES REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BS IN COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGY Foundation Credit 75 Foundation Credit 75 General Education Core 25 General Education Core 25 Electives 41 Electives 38 BIB 2213 Life of Christ 3 CIS 1103 Software Applications (or demonstrate proficiency) 3 9 REL 1013 Survey of Biblical Literature 3 Prerequisites: PSY 1403 Preparation for Statistics PSY 2013 General Psychology PSY 3303 Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences CIS 1103 Software Applications (or demonstrate proficiency) 3 Biblical Studies Major 45 BIB 3123 Old Testament Prophets BIB 3233 Pauline Letters 3 BIB 3263 Hebrews 3 BIB 3223 Romans 3 BIB 4213 Luke/Acts 3 MIN 3323 Introduction to Preaching 3 MIN 3523 Ministry and Congregational Life 3 MIN 3613 Counseling for Ministers 3 MIN 3623 The Church and Society 3 MIN 4873 Internship OR MIN 2513 Theology of Ministry 3 PHI 2933 Introduction to Ethics 3 PHI 3923 World Religions 3 REL 2983 Biblical Interpretation 3 REL 3703 Survey of Church History 3 REL 4963 Systematic Christian Doctrine Counseling Psychology Major 3 3 TOTAL FOR BIBLICAL STUDIES MAJOR PSY 3013 Psychology of Personality PSY 3033 Abnormal Psychology 3 PSY 3223 Psychology of Adulthood and Aging 3 PSY 3313 Introduction to Psychological Assessment 3 PSY 3323 Research Methods 3 PSY 3403 Introduction to Psychotherapy and Counseling 3 PSY 3413 Substance Abuse and Addictive Behaviors 3 PSY 3423 Diversity and Cross-Cultural Psychology 3 PSY 4403 Introduction to Career Development & Guidance 3 PSY 4413 Introduction to Marital and Family Systems 3 PSY 4423 Psychology of Group Processes 3 PSY 4893 Psychology Seminar (capstone course) 3 PSY 4913 Directed Research 3 PSY 4943 Ethics in Behavioral Sciences 120 3 3 REL 1013 Survey of Biblical Literature 3 TOTAL FOR COUNSELING PSYCHOLOGY MAJOR Rochester College 45 Page 141 Page 142 120 Rochester College BS with Early Childhood Studies Major Admission to the program requires current employment in the field of Early Childhood. BS with Mass Communication / Broadcasting or Graphic Design Fulfillment of degree requirements requires completion of the radio, video, or graphic arts design course at Specs Howard School of Broadcast Arts. REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BS IN EARLY CHILDHOOD STUDIES Foundation Credit 75 General Education Core Electives Foundation Credit 25 38 75 3 Early Childhood Studies Major 45 ECS 3243 Math and Science for Young Children 3 ECS 3323 Assessment of the Young Child 3 ECS 3423 Diversity Issues in Early Childhood 3 ECS 3433 Creative Arts for Young Children 3 ECS 4303 Family Education and Advocacy 3 ECS 4443 Emerging Language and Literacy 3 ECS 4313 Classroom Interactions 23 24 CIS 1103 Software Applications (or demonstrate proficiency) 3 Mass Communication / Broadcasting Major 3 ECS 3303 Legal Issues in Early Childhood 25 Production Core and Concentration (radio, video, or graphic arts) at Specs (students who take both radio and video will earn 36 semester hours) 9 CIS 1103 Software Applications (or demonstrate proficiency) General Education Core Electives Prerequisites: PSY 2013 General Psychology ECS Introductory Classes and practicum 3 ECS 4613 Special Needs Children & Families (Main Campus) OR REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BS IN MASS COMMUNICATION / BROADCASTING/GRAPHIC DESIGN 45 COM 2223 Public Speaking COM 3513 Small Group Communication MED 2013 Introduction to Mass Communication MED 2613 Introduction to Public Relations PSY 3203 Child Development RDG 3313 Children’s Literature REL 1013 Survey of Biblical Literature 3 3 3 MKT 3513 Studies in Marketing 3 REL 1013 Survey of Biblical Literature 3 3 MED 4943 Media Ethics 3 3 MED 4113 Media Law 3 3 MED 3513 Public Relations Writing and Visual Design PSY 3193 Infant and Toddler Development 3 MED 3013 Media Theory 3 3 MED 3323 Research Methods in Media ECS 4943 Ethics in Early Childhood 3 MED 2513 Media Writing 3 3 MED 3003 Media and Society ECS 4653 Leadership Issues in Early Childhood 3 COM 4813 Senior Project (capstone course) ECS 4623 Identifying & Serving the At-Risk Child (Macomb Campus) 3 COM 3533 Intercultural Communication 3 3 3 3 TOTAL FOR EARLY CHILDHOOD STUDIES MAJOR Rochester College TOTAL FOR MASS COMMUNICATION /BROADCASTING MAJOR 120 120 Page 143 Page 144 Rochester College REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BS IN MASS COMMUNICATION/MEDIA AND COMMUNICATION ARTS Foundation Credit REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BS IN MASS COMMUNICATION/PUBLIC RELATIONS 75 General Education Core 25 Media and Communication Arts Track (Macomb Community College) 50 Mass Communication Major COM 3533 Intercultural Communication 3 MED 2013 Introduction to Mass Communication 3 MED 2513 Media Writing 3 MED 3003 Media and Society 3 MED 3113 New Media Strategies 3 MED 2013 Media Theory 3 MED 3323 Research Methods in Media 3 MED 3513 Public Relations Writing and Visual Design 3 MED 4113 Media Law 3 MED 4943 Media Ethics 3 MED 4953 Media Seminar and Portfolio (Capstone) 3 MKT 3513 Studies in Marketing 3 REL 1013 Survey of Biblical Literature 3 41 Prerequisites: MED 2013 Introduction to Mass Communication MED 2613 Introduction to Public Relations 6 CIS 1103 Software Applications (or demonstrate proficiency) 3 25 Electives / Technical / Occupational 3 COM 3513 Small Group Communication 75 General Education Core 45 COM 2223 Public Speaking Foundation Credit 3 Mass Communication / Public Relations Major 45 COM 3513 Small Group Communication 3 COM 3533 Intercultural Communication 3 MED 2513 Media Writing 3 MED 3003 Media and Society 3 MED 2013 Media Theory 3 MED 3323 Research Methods in Media 3 MED 3513 Public Relations Writing and Visual Design 3 MED 4113 Media Law 3 MED 4323 Public Relations Campaigns and Strategies 3 MED 4943 Media Ethics (note: 3 credit hour version online) 3 MKT 3513 Studies in Marketing 3 MKT 3533 Consumer Behavior 3 3 REL 1013 Survey of Biblical Literature 120 3 MKT 3543 Integrated Marketing Communications TOTAL FOR MASS COMMUNICATION /Media and Communication Arts COM 2223 Public Speaking 3 TOTAL FOR MASS COMMUNICATION /PUBLIC RELATIONS MAJOR Rochester College Page 145 Page 146 120 Rochester College COURSE DESCRIPTIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BS IN ORGANIZATIONAL LEADERSHIP AND COMMUNICATION Foundation Credit 75 General Education Core 25 Electives / Technical / Occupational 38 Prerequisites: MGT 2603 Principles of Management MGT 3603 Organizational Behavior CIS 1103 Software Applications (or demonstrate proficiency) 9 Rochester College uses a four-digit course numbering system. In each course number, the first digit represents the course level; freshman level courses begin with “1,” sophomore courses begin with “2,” junior courses “3” and senior courses “4.” Courses that begin with “1” or “2” are lower-division and courses that begin with “3” or “4” are upper-division. The second digit of each course number is the subdivision within the academic department. The third digit represents the sequence within each departmental subdivision. The fourth digit represents the number of semester hours the course is worth. Abbreviations used: Organizational Leadership and Communication Major 45 CR – Co-requisite. Courses may be taken concurrently. PI – Permission of instructor Organizational Leadership Core PR – Pre-requisite. Pre-requisite course must be successfully completed first. BUS 3423 Studies in Economics Issues 3 BUS 4943 Ethics in Business 3 MGT 3613 Human Resources Management 3 MGT 3653 Leadership Theory 3 MGT 3703 Management Information Systems 3 MGT 3713 Operations Management 3 MGT 4123 Financial Planning and Control Systems 3 MGT 4723 Leadership Seminar 3 REL 1013 Survey of Biblical Literature 3 ACC - Accounting ACC 2113 Accounting I This introductory accounting course presents the foundation of accounting theory, practice, and simple analysis in sole proprietorships. PR: Math ACT of 25 or above, or MAT 1103 or MAT 1203. ACC 2123 Accounting II Building upon the foundation laid in Accounting I, this course addresses accounting in partnerships and corporations, including managerial accounting, and standard cost systems for manufacturing concerns, thus giving students a fundamental foundation of accounting principles for tracking, control, and decision making. PR: Minimum grade of C- or higher in ACC 2113. ACC 3113 Intermediate Accounting I This course further investigates the procedures for accounting for cash, receivables, inventory, plant assets, intangibles, depreciation, amortization, time value of money, and other concepts. This knowledge gives students the ability to produce data to assist a company in getting the most out of its assets. PR: Grade of C- or higher in ACC 2123. Communication Core BUS 3003 Business Communication 3 COM 3513 Small Group Communication 3 COM 3523 Interpersonal Communication 3 COM 3533 Intercultural Communication 3 ENG 4523 Advanced Composition 3 MED 3513 Public Relations Writing and Visual Design 3 TOTAL FOR ORGANIZATIONAL LEADERSHIP AND COMMUNICATION MAJOR ACC 3123 Intermediate Accounting II The last in a sequence of fundamental accounting courses, this course covers accounting for current and long-term liabilities, stockholders’ equity, earnings per share, and revenue recognition. PR: Grade of C- or higher in ACC 3113. 120 ACC 3143 Cost Accounting Students study of principles and techniques of cost accounting for product costing, planning, and control. Topics include but are not limited to job-order, process, and hybrid costing systems, allocation methods, cost-volume profit analysis, standard costing, and flexible budgeting. PR: ACC 2123. ACC 3213 Auditing This course takes a look at the intriguing practice of company auditing by addressing the role of the public accountant, professional standards, attestation Rochester College Page 147 Page 148 Rochester College and other assurance services, audit evidence and documentation, and reports on audited financial statements. Particular emphasis is on the auditor’s decisionmaking process by integrating coverage of the components of audit risk with tests of controls and substantive tests that relate to selected transaction cycles. PR: ACC 3123. ART 2003 Art Appreciation The world’s great visual art as surveyed from ancient to modern times. Uncovers great artists’ motives by seeking to understand the historical context in which each artist lived and worked. Includes brief introduction to art principles that define great works. ACC 3223 Managerial Accounting This is an advanced course that goes beyond the fundamentals of accounting. The development, interpretation, and use of relevant cost behavior, control, and traceability concepts for management planning, controlling and decision making are emphasized. Topics include an introduction to product costing, the contribution concept, direct costing, performance standards and variance analysis, responsibility accounting, segment profitability, alternative choice decisions, and capital budgeting. PR: ACC 2123. ART 2443 Two-Dimensional Design Creative visual thinking is an integral part of this course. Investigate different theories of compositional design elements on a flat surface. A variety of techniques, including drawing, collage, mixed media, painting and digital photography will be explored. Practical principles of graphic design and basic color theory will be introduced. Course fee. ACC 3313 Taxation The course studies federal income tax law and procedures as they pertain to corporations. Topics include but are not limited to gross income, property basis, exclusions, and deductions and credits. Emphasis is placed on practical problem solving using tax forms, tax research and tax planning cases. PR: ACC 3123. ACC 4223 Accounting Seminar A case analysis class that covers all the aspects of accounting functions relating to management decision making. The creation and distribution of management and accounting information and the management of the resource are stressed. Operational, tactical and strategic information systems will be analyzed. This class serves as the capstone course in the major for assessment purposes. PR: ACC 4313. ACC 4313 Accounting Theory An in-depth discussion of the theory and development of generally accepted accounting principles. This course addresses the conceptual framework of accounting and the environment in which accounting interacts. PR: ACC 3123. ACC 4413 Advanced Accounting This course explores accounting techniques that go beyond the typical transactions. Topics covered include: consolidated financial statements, foreign operations, segment and interim reporting, and partnership accounting. PR: ACC 3123. ART - Art ART 1413 Drawing I Create convincing images on paper with rendering techniques by maximizing the use of composition, volume, and perspective. Improve visual observation skills of nature and light to reach objective. Understand the effect of line quality, shape, value, texture, space, and color. Course fee. ART 1423 Drawing II Emphasize individual creative expression by developing a greater understanding of advance conceptual and technical issues. Explore a wide range of various drawing media, including mixed media and collage. Still life, the figure, landscape, interiors, and abstract subject matter will be integrated in this course. PR: ART 1413 or PI. Course fee. Rochester College Page 149 BIB - Bible BIB 2113 Genesis The Genesis narrative from creation up to the death of the patriarchs. Abrahamic covenant and the early nation of Israel. BIB 2213 Life of Christ Introduction to the life and teachings of Jesus Christ as represented in the gospel literature of the New Testament. BIB 2223 Christian Beginnings: Acts Introduction to the life and mission of the earliest Christians as represented in the Acts of the Apostles. BIB 3123 Old Testament Prophets Historical, literary, cultural, and theological analysis of the entire Old Testament prophetic books, Isaiah through Malachi. PR: REL 2983. CEL only. BIB 3133 Major Prophets Historical, literary, cultural, and theological analysis of Isaiah, Jeremiah, and Ezekiel. PR: REL 2983. BIB 3143 Minor Prophets Historical, literary, cultural, and theological analysis of the twelve prophetic books, Hosea through Malachi. PR: REL 2983. BIB 3153 Old Testament Poetic Literature Literary, cultural, and theological analysis of Psalms, Song of Songs, and Lamentations. PR: REL 2983. BIB 3163 Old Testament Wisdom Literature Literary, cultural, and theological analysis of Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, and Job. PR: REL 2983. BIB 3223 Romans A study of Paul’s letter to the Romans with attention to its historical context and literary function. This study approaches Romans as the fullest, most systematic expression of Pauline thinking about such religious concepts as grace, faith, justification, sin, death, law, and the Spirit. In addition, attention will be paid to the history of interpretation of Romans. PR: Junior status. Page 150 Rochester College BIB 3233 Pauline Letters I A study of Paul’s earlier letters, including 1 and 2 Thessalonians and Galatians, with attention given to their historical context and literary function as well as what they contribute to our understanding of Paul’s life and teachings. PR: Junior status. BIB 3243 Pauline Letters II A study of Paul’s later letters, alternating between the Prison Epistles (Philippians, Philemon, Colossians, and Ephesians) and the Pastoral Epistles (1 and 2 Timothy, Titus). The study will attend to the historical context and literary function of these letters as well as what they contribute to our understanding of Paul’s life and teachings. PR: Junior status. BIB 3263 Hebrews A study of the book of Hebrews that focuses on its literary purpose, historical context, and theology. PR: Junior status. BIB 3273 General Epistles A study of 1 and 2 Peter, James, and Jude that emphasizes the literary purpose, historical context, and theology of each book. PR: Junior status. BIB 3283 Revelation A study of the theological message of Revelation, both within its original historical and cultural context and with respect to its modern relevance. Selected topics include apocalyptic, eschatology, the nature of symbolism, the nature of biblical prophecy, and the issue of human suffering. PR: Junior status. BIB 3293 Mark A study of the Markan narrative of Christ’s ministry, with special emphasis on its background, its unique themes, and its relationship to Matthew and Luke. PR: Junior status. BIB 4013 Biblical Archaeology Theory, Method, and Context. An archaeological overview of the cultural and political history of the Land of Israel from the Bronze Age through the Iron Age (Canaanite and Israelite periods 3200-586 BCE) with special focus on Biblical Tamar (aka Ein Hatzeva). The primary goal of the course is the integration of biblical studies with the archaeology of Tamar by involving students in lectures, discussion, research, and virtual archaeology via computer and, for those who elect to do the fieldwork, actual excavation of the material culture at Tamar and examination of artifacts from Tamar stored at the Israel Museum in Jerusalem. PR: PI BIB 4123 Archaeology of Biblical Tamar in Israel (Fieldwork) This is the fieldwork attached to BIB 4013; students are involved in actual excavation of Biblical Tamar. PR: PI BIB 4153 Pentateuch Historical, literary, cultural, and theological analysis of Genesis through Deuteronomy. PR: REL 2983, Senior status. BIB 4193 History and Theology of the Old Testament This course is an exploration of history and theology in dynamic relationship within the Old Testament. Various theological perspectives within the Old Testament will be examined in light of the historical background and crises which offer a concrete Rochester College Page 151 context for their development. The means of examination will be a contextualideological approach to reading the Old Testament that pays special attention to the socioeconomic, political, religious, and community aspects of diverse theological views that form and reform across the long history represented in the Old Testament. PR: REL 2983, Senior status. BIB 4213 Luke/Acts The birth and expansion of the early church in a historical, textual, and theological study of the book of Acts. Highlights the relevance of Acts to the contemporary church. PR: REL 2983, Senior status. BIB 4233 Synoptic Gospels Contextual study of the life and teachings of Jesus Christ, stressing the history, text, theology, and interrelationship of Matthew, Mark, and Luke. PR: REL 2983, Senior status. BIB 4253 1 and 2 Corinthians Historical, textual, and practical study of Paul’s letters to the church in Corinth. Explores problems in the early church and application of Christian principles to problem solving in the contemporary church. PR: REL 2983, Senior status. BIB 4263 Gospel and Letters of John Studies the gospel of John and 1, 2, and 3 John. Highlights the nature of Christ and early church problems. PR: REL 2983, Senior status. BIB 4293 History and Theology of the New Testament This course is an exploration of history and theology in dynamic relationship within the New Testament. Various theological perspectives within the New Testament will be examined in light of the historical background and historical crises which offer a concrete context for their development. PR: REL 2983, Senior status. BIO - Biology BIO 1014 Biological Science I with Lab Cellular structure and function, cell division and reproduction, genetics, metabolism, and development. For non-science and beginning majors. Course fee. BIO 1024 Biological Science II with Lab Plant and animal anatomy and physiology, ecology, and evolution. For non-science and beginning majors. Course fee. BIO 1102 Nature Study Ecology and identification techniques for plant and animal phyla. Meets first ten weeks of the semester. BIO 1112 Introduction to Biological Science An overview of cell structure, genetics, zoology, botany, and ecology including current issues related to these topics. Non-majors. Lecture only. BIO 1124 Zoology Major phyla of the animal kingdom, including the basic principles of comparative anatomy, physiology, morphology, behavior, and ecology. Course fee. BIO 2011 Intro to Human Anatomy & Physiology Lab A lab to accompany BIO 2013. CR: BIO 2013. Course fee. Page 152 Rochester College BIO 2013 Introduction to Human Anatomy and Physiology A non-laboratory study of the functioning of the human body with an emphasis on the interaction of organs and systems. Discussion of disease prevention and health are also included. Credit cannot be given for BIO 2013 and BIO 2114 or 2124. BIO 2114 Human Anatomy and Physiology I Structure and function of the muscular, skeletal, nervous, and endocrine systems, and how they work together to support the human body. Supplementary topics include cell biology and histology. Course fee. BIO 2124 Human Anatomy and Physiology II Structure and function of the circulatory, lymph, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. Supplementary topics include electrolyte, acid/base, and fluid balance. Course fee. PR: BIO 2114. BIO 2224 Introductory Botany and Zoology Introductory anatomy, physiology, taxonomy and ecology for the major phyla of the plant and animal kingdoms. Course fee. BIO 2313 Nutrition Principles of nutrition, metabolism, food values, and dietary requirements for healthy body maintenance and growth. BIO 3114 Botany Advanced topics in plant biology including cell structure, anatomy, physiology, metabolism, and ecology. Course fee. PR: BIO 1024 or BIO 2224. BIO 3213 General Ecology Basic ecological concepts with lab covering experimental designs and research methods used to study and interpret data. Biomes, community interactions, population dynamics, energy, and material flow. BIO 3324 Microbiology Fundamental concepts of microbiology with emphasis on the morphology and physiology of microorganisms. Includes applications of microbiology in medicine, food preparation, and industry. PR: Grade of C or higher in BIO 1014 or BIO 1124, or PI. Course fee. BIO 3414 Genetics Structure and function of DNA, genes, gene expression, inheritance patterns, prokaryote and eukaryote chromosome structure, and modern gene technology. Laboratory includes classic and molecular exercises in genetics. Course fee. PR: BIO 1014. BUS - Business BUS 2403 Macroeconomics The course introduces students to the basic principles of economics in general and of macroeconomics (the “big” picture) in particular. Central topics of study include supply and demand, the role of government monetary and fiscal policies, national income, business cycles, and changes in aggregate price levels. BUS 2413 Microeconomics The course introduces students to the basic principles of economics in general and of microeconomics in particular. Central topics include: markets, competition, market power, labor markets, and government programs. BUS 3003 Business Communication A survey of interpersonal oral and written communication: presentational speaking, interviewing skills, listening, nonverbal communication, conflict resolution, group dynamics, letter and memo writing, developments in business communication technology. PR: ENG 1113. BUS 3033 International Business This course exposes students to the global marketplace, helping them to understand multinational businesses in diverse cultures; international politics and law; the global economy; business operations in an international environment. PR: BUS 2403. BUS 3303 Business Law An introduction to the legal aspects of business, this course specifically deals with the issues of contracts, commercial sales (Uniform Commercial Code), and torts. Students learn legal principles by using the case law method. BUS 3423 Studies in Economic Issues Students are introduced to basic economic principles including a variety of relevant topics from both microeconomics and macroeconomics. Includes such issues as economic analysis, supply and demand, role of government, world economics, fiscal policy, monetary policy, externalities and market failure, factor and product markets, and business ownership and organization. CEL only. BUS 4813 Business Internship Applies theory to “real world” field experiences related to the student’s major through: a minimum of 150 hours work experience with an approved employer; completion of a work journal; internship reports; reading related professional materials; and completing all the components of the School of Business Portfolio. This course is graded on a pass/fail basis. PR: PI. BIO 4603 Methods & Assessment Strategies in Biology Education Capstone course for the biology education major. Models research-based methods and assessment strategies for effectively teaching biological science in middle school and high school. Incorporation of national and state standards and curriculum, with a special emphasis on the Michigan Curriculum Framework. A supervised sixty hour field experience is required. PR/CR: Completion of biology major coursework. Course fee. CR: EDU 4282. BUS 4823 Business Strategy and Policy This course explores the process of developing, implementing, and maintaining an effective business strategy. Students integrate techniques and concepts from previous course work in a variety of “real world” and simulated situations. This course serves as the capstone course of the BBA program for assessment purposes. PR: Senior. Completion of business core, except internship. Course fee. Rochester College Page 154 Page 153 BUS 4943 Ethics in Business Students focus on ethical issues related to the business environment including: ethical models and frameworks; individual rights and values; individual Rochester College responsibilities; organizational rights and responsibilities; ethical policy development; the influence of organizational culture on ethical behavior; and the role of Christian principles and values on organizational life. Trad PR: PHI 2933 and Senior status. CHE - Chemistry CHE 1314 Intro to Chemistry I Atomic structure, bonding and quantitative principles in chemistry. Acids, bases, solutions and chemical reactions. Includes a laboratory component. PR/CR: MAT 1103. CHE 1324 Intro to Chemistry II Classes, properties and reactions of organic compounds. Structure, function and metabolism of carbohydrates, proteins, lipids and nucleic acids. Includes a laboratory component. PR: CHE 1314. CHE 1514 College Chemistry I Theory and quantitative principles of chemistry: Stoichiometry, atomic and molecular structure, gas law, thermochemistry, and solutions. Three hours lecture and three hours lab, weekly. PR/CR: MAT 1334 or MAT ACT of 24 or above. Course fee. CHE 1524 College Chemistry II Continuation of CHE 1514. Includes equilibria, precipitation reactions in aqueous solutions, kinetics, acids and bases, oxidation-reduction reactions, coordination compounds, nuclear chemistry, and a brief introduction to organic chemistry. Three hours lecture and three hours lab weekly. PR: Grade of C or better in CHE 1514 and MAT 1334 or above. Course fee. CHE 2514 Organic Chemistry I Structure, reactions, mechanism, and synthesis in the field of organic chemistry. Three hours lecture and three hours lab weekly. PR: CHE 1524. Course fee. CHE 2524 Organic Chemistry II Continuation of CHE 2514. Reactions of aliphatic and aromatic compounds. Reaction mechanisms, multistep syntheses, heterocyclic compounds, amino acids, proteins, carbohydrates, and nucleic acids. Three hours lecture and three hours lab weekly. PR: CHE 2514. Course fee. CHE 3514 Biochemistry I Structure and function of proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids. Enzyme mechanisms, kinetics, and regulation. Bioenergetics and catabolism. Three hours lecture and three hours lab weekly. PR: CHE 2514. Course fee. CIS - Computer Information Systems CIS 1103 Software Applications of Computers Hands-on microcomputer training for current available software applications for data management, spreadsheets, and other applications. Stresses familiarity with PC operating environment. CEL only. CIS 2443 Advanced Business Applications This course is designed to take students beyond the basics of using industry standard business applications including, but not limited to: Word, Excel, Access, Outlook, and Rochester College Page 155 PowerPoint. Students gain hands-on experience with the use of software packages for communication, data management, business analysis, and decision making. Students must have a fundamental working knowledge of the listed software programs prior to registering for this course. CIS 4313 E-Commerce This course provides an overview of e-commerce issues and topics that will include business models, hardware platforms, security, payment methods, out-sourcing, and management. With this understanding students will be able to analyze and evaluate tools, techniques and methods for developing and implementing an ecommerce strategy. COM - Communication COM 1013 Communication Basics Theory and practice in a variety of communication contexts, including verbal, nonverbal, perception, and listening. Includes practice in organizing and delivering speeches. COM 2223 Public Speaking Public speaking theory and practice. Students prepare and deliver several types of speeches. PR: C- or better in COM 1013. COM 3013 Communication Theory Survey of communication theories and models upon which communication studies are built. PR: C- or better in COM 1013 and ENG 1123. COM 3513 Small Group Communication Theories and techniques for small groups in various settings. PR: C- or better in COM 1013. COM 3523 Interpersonal Communication Elements of communication between two or more persons in family, social, work, church, and computer-mediated settings. PR: C- or better in COM 1013. COM 3533 Intercultural Communication Major theories and concepts involved in intercultural communication. Emphasis on increasing awareness of and sensitivity to persons of other cultures and/or cocultures and improving personal effectiveness in intercultural communication. PR: C- or better in COM 1013. COM 4613 Special Topics Various Communication topics chosen by students or instructor. COM 4813 Senior Project in Communication Preparation of a major paper in an area of the student’s interest. PR: Senior status and PI. ECS - Early Childhood Studies *All ECS classes for CEL only. Must be currently employed in ECS field. ECS 3243 Math & Science for Young Children Developmentally appropriate activities in the early childhood environment that encourage observation, exploration, inquiry, and the development of math and Page 156 Rochester College science concepts. Use of software that encourages math and science skills will be explored. ECS 3303 Legal Issues in Early Childhood General business law as it impacts early childhood settings. Includes such relevant topics as contracts, torts, employment law, business forms and their respective liability, reporting abuse and neglect, custody issues, licensing, and compliance. ECS 3323 Assessment of the Young Child Examination of both formal and informal measures used to observe and assess the physical, emotional, social, and intellectual development and growth of a young child. Emphasizes developmentally-appropriate instruments and alternative assessment procedures. The importance of assessment in evaluation, parent communication, and classroom planning is emphasized. ECS 3423 Diversity Issues in Early Childhood Strategies for working effectively with children and families from diverse socioeconomic, ethnic, and cultural backgrounds. Issues of communication, family values, and child-rearing practices will be emphasized. Students will be encouraged to examine their own biases as they relate to professional practices. ECS 3433 Creative Arts for Young Children Examination, rationale, and experiences in the creative use of art, music, movement, drama, literature, and storytelling. ECS 4303 Family Education and Advocacy Examination of the interaction between families and government and community agencies and resources. The effects of cultural and societal differences and the role of the child care professional in educating, empowering, and advocating for families with young children. ECS 4313 Classroom Interactions Introduction of components of high-quality classroom interactions that promote higher-order thinking skills, emotional support, and appropriate feedback. Required fieldwork allows student to develop strategies for recognition and implementation. ECS 4443 Emerging Language and Literacy Emphasis on the development of listening, speaking, pre-writing, and pre-reading skills in a developmentally appropriate context. Identifies and examines those practices and experiences most useful for promoting competency and interest in reading and writing. Examines the use of technology in the classroom to promote literacy development. ECS 4613 Special Needs Children and Families Issues faced by special needs children and the interventions that are available to them and their families. Special emphasis on parent-school communication and implications for planning in the classroom environment. ECS 4623 Identifying and Serving the At-Risk Child Family and societal characteristics that place a child at risk for academic or social failure. Parenting practices, economic issues, health care, and community resources available for young children and their families. Rochester College Page 157 ECS 4653 Leadership Issues in Early Childhood Analyzes and implements leadership and decision-making strategies in a professional setting. The course will focus on the characteristics of leadership, and the implications of both effective and ineffective leadership for organizations that serve young children. Students will develop a grant proposal for their early childhood program. This course serves as a capstone course for the early childhood program for assessment purposes. ECS 4943 Ethics for Early Childhood Ethical standards of early childhood practitioners reviewed in the context of the State of Michigan Law and the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) code. Contrasts philosophies of Biblical imperative and humanistic practice. EDU - Education EDU 2201 Introduction to Education Field Experience Required 30-hour placement for students enrolled in EDU 2202. Graded on a pass/fail basis. PR/CR: EDU 2202. Course fee. EDU 2202 Introduction to Education Exploration of the nature of the teaching profession. Includes examination of school structure and operation, foundations of education, and current issues and trends in the field. Emphasizes research, whole class and small-group discussion, observation, role-playing, and application of educational theory. Thirty-hour field experience required. PR: sophomore status with a 2.70 GPA. CR: EDU 2201. EDU 2241 Educational Psychology Field Experience Required 30-hour placement for students enrolled in EDU 2243. Graded on a pass/fail basis. PR/CR: EDU 2243. Course fee. EDU 2243 Educational Psychology Educational principles, research and theory fundamental to effective, high quality teaching and learning. Topics include information on human development, learning theory, the impact of culture and exceptionality, and various approaches to instruction. Research-based principles and time-tested strategies are applied to the classroom in practical ways. Development of framework on which to build future experiences in the field of education and content areas. Thirty-hour field experience required. PR: EDU 2202, sophomore status with a 2.70 GPA. CR: EDU 2241. EDU 2262 Classroom Technology Utilization of technology in teaching and learning. Emphasis on technology that develops student-centered learning, multisensory stimulation, multimedia lesson formats, collaborative work environments, information exchange, inquiry-based learning, critical thinking, and proactive planning within authentic, real world contexts. The ability of global discourse communities to facilitate cross-cultural understanding. Development and application of ethical standards/criteria for the use of the internet in the classroom. PR: EDU 2202, sophomore status with a 2.70 GPA. EDU 2283 Ethics and Philosophy of Education Examination of the ethics of teaching individuals from widely differing backgrounds. Overview of various educational philosophies and their relationship to the philosophies Page 158 Rochester College of ethics and morality. Presents case studies depicting moral and ethical dilemmas in educational settings. PR: EDU 2202, sophomore status with a 2.70 GPA. EDU 2303 Fine Arts for the Elementary Teacher Develops understanding, activities, methods and materials for integrating art and music into the elementary classroom. PR: EDU 2202, sophomore status with a 2.70 GPA. Course fee. EDU 3221 Classroom Teaching Strategies Field Experience Required 30-hour placement for students enrolled in EDU 3223. Graded on a pass/fail basis. PR/CR: EDU 3223. Course fee. EDU 3223 Classroom Teaching Strategies Introduction of components of effective, high quality classroom teaching documented through theoretical and applied research and practice. These components encompass planning and preparation, creating an inclusive classroom environment, and engaging students in intentional learning. A variety of student-centered instructional approaches are presented. Introduction of the Michigan Curriculum Framework. Supervised thirtyhour field experience required. PR: Admission to the Teacher Education Program. CR: EDU 3221. EDU 3243 Teaching Exceptional Students Overviews the field of special education. Study of the physical, psychological, social, and educational factors related to exceptional individuals, including the gifted and/or culturally diverse. Emphasis on the historical, legal, and current inclusionary models of special education that form the basis for the general education teacher’s role in serving students with special needs. PR: Admission to the Teacher Education Program. EDU 3262 Teaching Across Cultures A study of multicultural education designed to provide a background for developing competence as cross-cultural teachers. Presents a Biblical rationale for cultural pluralism. Discusses effective teaching strategies for educators working with K-12 students diverse in gender, class, ethnicity, religion, or language. Following completion of this course, students must take EDU 3271 Teaching Across Cultures Field Experience. PR: Admission to the Teacher Education Program; EDU 3223. EDU 3271 Teaching Across Cultures Field Experience An immersion field experience designed to build cross-cultural understanding and competence. Study of diversity from a community perspective. Interrelationship of cultural influences and school success. Development of dispositions and effective characteristics necessary to teaching in cross-cultural environments. Two-week intensive field placement required. PR: EDU 3262, Admission to the Teacher Education Program. Course fee. EDU 3313 Social Studies Foundations Interdisciplinary course comprising selected topics in geography, history, political science, and sociology, and overview of the structure of the respective disciplines. Designed to provide content background and resources for elementary school teachers. PR: Admission to the Teacher Education Program. Rochester College Page 159 EDU 4253 Classroom Management Strategies Investigation and assessment of various approaches to establishing an environment that fosters learning. Examination of organization and management of resources, supplies, and classroom configuration to provide an inviting and safe atmosphere. Discussion and analysis of various approaches to discipline in the classroom. Evaluation of a variety of strategies to handle disruptive behavior. Development of a personal classroom management style grounded in sound principles. Emphasis on research, whole-class and small-group discussion, observation, role-playing, and application theory. PR: Admission to the Teacher Education Program. EDU 4282 Foundations of Education Interdisciplinary study of education in the American society. Identification and examination of the central characteristics of the American educational system. Emphasis on the interpretation and appraisal of current educational practices and trends. PR: Admission to the Teacher Education Program. To be taken in the final semester of professional studies coursework prior to student teaching. EDU 4721/4821 Student Teaching Seminar (Elementary/Secondary) Supports the student teaching experience. Reviews policies, requirements and professional responsibilities and revisits the Elementary-Level Standards for Michigan Teachers and Pathwise Domains, the standards used to evaluate student teachers. Practical advice and information on communicating with parents and finding a job. CR: EDU 4728/4828 Student Teaching. EDU 4728/4828 Student Teaching (Elementary/Secondary) Final requirement for pre-service teachers seeking elementary/ secondary certification through Michigan Department of Education. The one-semester student teaching assignment consists of 15 full weeks, resulting in eight hours of course credit. CR: EDU 4721/4821 Student Teaching Seminar. PR: Admission to Student Teaching. Course fee. ENG - English ENG 1013 Fundamentals of Composition Practice in the basics of writing: diction, grammar, syntax, style, organization and mechanics. Required for students with an ACT English score of 16 or below or a Verbal SAT score of 400 or below. Does not count toward graduation. ENG 1113 College Composition A Writing and revising expository papers and documented reports. Students read and analyze selected essays and articles. PR: English ACT of 17+; or grade of C or better in ENG 1013. ENG 1123 College Composition B Writing critical essays and research papers; Examines forms of imaginative literature. PR: C or better in ENG 1113 or ACT 25+. ENG 2113 Approaches to Grammar History and development of the English language. Political and cultural influences on the language and an analysis of the relation between theoretical and practical approaches to English study. PR: ENG 1123. Page 160 Rochester College ENG 2413 World Literature Survey A comparative study of literature from a variety of world cultures. PR: ENG 1123. ENG 3213 British Writers to 1800 British writers of medieval times to the close of the 18th century, and characteristics of the literary periods. PR: ENG 1123. ENG 3223 British Writers 1800 to Present British writers of the late 18th century to the early 20th century, and characteristics of the literary periods. PR: ENG 1123. ENG 3313 American Writers to 1865 An analytical study of the development of American Literature from the Colonial era to the Civil War. PR: ENG 1123. ENG 3323 American Writers 1865 to Present Major works from the Civil War to the present. PR: ENG 1123. ENG 3513 Critical Writing and Literary Analysis Advanced writing course on types of writing used to analyze literature. Analytical application of major literary criticism philosophies. PR: ENG 1123. ENG 3523 Creative Writing Creative writing theory and practice in a seminar setting; Composition of fiction, poetry, and/or drama. Also, sources of creative writing, characteristics of major genres, and process of revision and editing. PR: ENG 1123. ENG 3613 Introduction to Linguistics Basic concepts and methodology of the science of language: Descriptive and historical aspects, phonemic, morphemic, and syntactical features. PR: ENG 1123. ENG 4203 Shakespeare A critical study of selected Shakespearean histories, comedies, and tragedies, synthesizing the historical, linguistic, theatrical, and cultural context of these writings. PR: ENG 1123 and 3513. Course fee. ENG 4413 Pluralism in American Literature African, Asian, Arab, Hispanic, and Native-American voices in American literature. PR: ENG 1123 and 3513. ENG 4523 Advanced Composition Advanced writing, revision, and editing. PR: ENG 1123. ENG 4533 Senior Writing Project Student preparation of a major paper in an area of interest. PR: ENG 1123 and 3513. ENG 4593 Special Topics in English Various topics in English; offered at the discretion of instructor. PR: ENG 1123 and 3513. ENG 4603 Methods and Assessment Strategies in English Education Capstone course in the English Education major. Presents strategies, methods, and assessment for effectively teaching middle and high school English students. Using an integrated language arts perspective, teacher candidates research, design and implement lessons that meet the state and national standards and gain practical tools Rochester College Page 161 to assess student growth. Emphasizes the development of professional practice through reading professional literature and participating in professional organizations. A supervised sixty hour field experience is required. PR/CR: Completion of English major coursework. CR: EDU 4282. Course fee. ENG 4613 Advanced Literary Theory A continuation of ENG 3513: Philosophies of literary criticism. PR: ENG 1123 and 3513. ENG 4713 Studies in Genre: Novels An analytical study of the structure of the novel in the context of selected novels including critical and literary analysis of each narrative. PR: ENG 1123 and 3513. ENG 4723 Studies in Genre: Short Story Literary analysis of selected short stories. PR: ENG 1123 and 3513. ENG 4733 Studies in Genre: Poetry Literary analysis of selected poetry. PR: ENG 1123 and 3513. ENG 4743 Studies in Genre: Drama Literary analysis of selected dramas. PR: ENG 1123 and 3513. FIN - Finance FIN 3113 Personal Financial Management One of the most practical courses one can take, this course provides an overview of personal finance issues and is designed to help students better manage their financial resources. Key topics include the following: Long-term financial planning, budgeting, retirement strategies and vehicles, tax planning, savings and investment options, home ownership, financing and leasing options, insurance and personal risk management. FIN 3203 Principles of Finance This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of how to best manage the financial resources of a firm. Students will gain an understanding of financial analysis, capital budgeting, asset valuation, working capital, credit policies, accrued and current debt policy, sources of financial structure, costs of capital, dividend policy, and securities markets. PR: ACC 2123. FIN 3213 Financial Markets This course provides an overview of financial market theory, practice, and history. Discussion will include the nature and function of money, banking and credit, the role of the Federal Reserve, U.S. monetary policy, interest rate theory, capital and derivatives markets, foreign currency exchange, U.S. balance of payments, and international finance agencies. PR: BUS 2403 and 2413; FIN 3203. FIN 3223 Bank and Financial Institution Management This course examines the financial regulatory and economic environment in which banks and other financial institutions operate. Students will study the internal operations of a bank, analyze bank financial statements, and apply appropriate analysis in the context of budgeting and strategic planning. An inquiry will be made into a bank’s investment function as well as the marketing of banking services. Students will also examine bank funding and requirements and asset/liability management techniques. In Page 162 Rochester College addition, the competitive aspects of the financial services industry in comparison with non-financial service organizations. PR: BUS 2403 and FIN 3203. FIN 3243 Investment Management Students are provided a general framework for constructing financial portfolios and valuing investments. Important concepts include portfolio theory, credit analysis, valuation of call and conversions features on debt instruments, and fundamental analysis of equities and foreign assets. PR: FIN 3203. FIN 3253 Risk Management This course provides a framework for recognizing the essential elements that mitigate loss and expedite business recovery which is essential in risk management operations. Identifying and managing risk, crisis and disaster management, and emergency/contingency planning will be discussed. PR: FIN 3203. FIN 4003 Corporate Finance The course provides an in-depth study of the theories and practices related to the financial administration of the firm. Areas covered include financial valuation, risk analysis, capital budgeting, capital structure and dividend policy, long term financing decisions, and asset management. PR: FIN 3203. FLM - Film FLM 2013 Film Appreciation An introduction to the art of film. Includes such topics as film making, early history of the industry, genres, and theories. Students view and analyze a number of films in order to better understand the impact of film on individuals and society. FLM 2423 Film History History of the film industry with special attention to influences of the industry and the industry’s influence on history. GEO - Geography GEO 1013 Introduction to Geography A survey of the basic geographic concepts, terms, and methods used in the earth science, culture-environmental, locational, and area analysis traditions. Emphasis on religion, population, language, traditions, and urbanization. GEO 3113 World Regions An examination of the political, economic, cultural, and environmental dynamics that shape the major world regions. Evaluations include Africa, Asia, AngloAmerica, Europe, the Commonwealth of Independent States, Latin America, the Middle East, and the Pacific Islands. GER - German GER 1214 Elementary German I Basic vocabulary, grammar, and practice in understanding, speaking, writing, and reading German. GER 1224 Elementary German II Vocabulary-building and complex grammatical construction. Stresses the spoken language and German culture. PR: GER 1214 or three semesters of high school German. Rochester College Page 163 GRE - Greek GRE 1214 Elementary Greek I Basic Koine Greek. Highlights the importance and function of Greek language in the writing of New Testament books and letters. GRE 1224 Elementary Greek II A continuation of GRE 1214 that includes selected readings from the New Testament. PR: GRE 1214. GRE 3314 Intermediate Greek Grammar Selected readings from the Greek New Testament, with an emphasis on advanced features of grammar and syntax. PR: GRE 1224. GRE 3413 Advanced Greek Readings I Selected readings from the Greek New Testament. PR: GRE 3314. GRE 3423 Advanced Greek Readings II Selected readings from the Greek New Testament. PR: GRE 3314. HEB - Hebrew HEB 1214 Elementary Hebrew I Basic principles, grammar, and vocabulary needed to translate from the Hebrew Bible. HEB 1224 Elementary Hebrew II Continuation of HEB 1214; additional grammatical and vocabulary skills. Includes readings from the Hebrew Bible. PR: HEB 1214. HEB 3413 Advanced Hebrew Readings I Selected Readings from the Hebrew Old Testament. PR: HEB 1224. HEB 3423 Advanced Hebrew Readings II Selected Readings from the Hebrew Old Testament. PR: HEB 1224. HIS - History HIS 1313 Western Civilization to 1500 Examines important events, people, institutions, and ideas in the foundations of Western civilization. Coverage includes the ancient Near East; Greece; Rome; the spread and influence of Christianity; the Byzantine and Islamic empires; Medieval Europe; and the Renaissance. HIS 1323 Western Civilization, 1500 to Present Examines Western development from the Protestant Reformation to the present. Major themes and topics include European overseas empires, religious reform and warfare; the rise of science and reason; the French Revolutionary era; capitalist, socialist, and nationalist ideologies; industrialization; World Wars; the Cold War; decolonization; and globalization. HIS 2113 Michigan History Significant events and people in the state’s history from European settlement to the present. Page 164 Rochester College HIS 2513 United States History to 1877 Surveys American political, economic, social, cultural, and ideological development from colonization through Reconstruction. Includes European settlement and the Atlantic World; the American Revolution, Constitution, and early national debates; democratic and territorial expansion; slavery and the origins, course, and aftermath of the Civil War. HIS 2523 United States History, 1877 to Present Surveys American political, economic, social, cultural, and ideological development from the post-Reconstruction period to the present. Topics include the impact of industrialization, urbanization, immigration, rising power, world wars, prosperity and depression; the Cold War; computers; and globalization. HIS 3313 The French Revolution and Napoleonic Era Highlighting institutional, ideological, and social change, this course examines the origins, development, and impact of the French Revolution and Napoleonic Empire, among the great transforming periods in Western history. PR: Sophomore status or PI. HIS 3323 Nineteenth-Century Europe Examines political, economic, ideological, social, cultural, and technological developments in Europe from 1815 to World War I. Topics include the Industrial Revolution and its effects, liberalism and democracy, socialism, nationalism, and imperialism. PR: Sophomore status or PI. HIS 3423 Emerging Nations This course evaluates patterns of political, social, religious and economic development in Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Middle East. Regional case studies focus on flashpoints within each realm and possible solutions to bring the regions into the global community. PR: Sophomore status or PI. HIS 3503 Women in American History This course traces the status and contributions of women in each of the major eras of American history. Examines the roles of leaders and pioneers as well as the changing legal, political, and socio-economic status of the majority of American women, including minorities, and the struggles for suffrage and equality. PR: Sophomore status or PI. HIS 3513 History of American Foreign Relations Reviews major ideas, episodes, personalities, institutions, and interpretations of American foreign policy and diplomacy from the founding era to the present. Includes issues relating to the Revolutionary War and the early republic; expansionism; the Civil War; imperialism; world conflicts; the Cold War; and globalization. PR: Sophomore status or PI. HIS 3523 Colonial and Revolutionary America This course examines the colonial heritage and founding of the United States. Major topics include European colonization; English colonial politics, societies, and cultures; the Atlantic commercial system; immigration and slavery; imperial relations; the War for Independence; and the establishment of the Constitution. PR: Sophomore status or PI. Rochester College Page 165 HIS 3533 The Early American Republic Examines developments in the first decades of the United States under the Constitution, including the establishment of the new federal government, political culture and the rise of parties; the Jeffersonian triumph; the War of 1812; early constitutional issues; the Market Revolution; revivalism and reform; the rise of Jacksonian democracy; slavery and federalism; Manifest Destiny; and the war with Mexico. PR: Sophomore status or PI. HIS 3543 The Rise of Industrial America A study of major developments relating to the dramatic technological, economic, geographic, and demographic changes in post-Reconstruction America. With emphasis on debates over the proper role of government, topics include western expansion; the rise of big business; Gilded Age politics; urbanization and immigration; labor and Populist movements; imperialism; Progressivism; and the modern presidency. PR: Sophomore status or PI. HIS 3553 America in World Crises This course overviews the major twentieth-century upheavals that brought the United States into a dominant position in the world theater and transformed its political and social landscape. Close attention is given to the First World War and the peace; the “Roaring Twenties;” the Depression and New Deal; World War II; and the onset of the Cold War. PR: Sophomore status or PI. HIS 3603 Methods and Assessment Strategies in History Education Capstone course for the History Education minor. Presents research-based methods and assessment strategies for effectively teaching middle and high school History and Social Studies. Incorporates national and state standards and curriculum, with a special emphasis on the Michigan Curriculum Framework. A supervised 30-hour field experience is required. PR/CR: Completion of history education minor coursework. Course fee. HIS 3813 Historical Research and Writing An introduction to upper-level historical study, this course examines the history, nature, sources, and methods of historical investigation and writing. Guided assignments, including a major research paper, exercise learned concepts and skills. PR: Sophomore status or PI. HIS 4323 Europe in the Age of World Wars Examines major events, ideas, individuals and institutions in an era of total war, the most destructive in human history. Includes the origins, major features and consequences of World War I and the peace; The Bolshevik Revolution and the rise of the Soviet Union; interwar economics, diplomacy, science, philosophy, art and culture; the struggles of democracy and the rise of fascism; the nature and culture of Nazi Germany; and the onset, course and consequences of World War II. PR: Sophomore status or PI. HIS 4333 Europe since 1945 Surveys the divergent paths of Western and Eastern European nations in the Cold War era, and the opportunities and challenges presented by the fall of European communism. Includes post-World War II recovery and reconstruction; the onset of the “Iron Curtain” and Cold War; decolonization; the European Union project; Page 166 Rochester College national politics, societies and cultures; the collapse of communist regimes; resurgent nationalism and the Yugoslav wars; and the challenges of globalization. PR: Sophomore status or PI. HIS 4503 Methods and Assessment Strategies in Social Studies Education Capstone course in the elementary Social Studies Education major. Presents research-based methods and assessment strategies for effectively teaching elementary and middle school Social Studies. Incorporates national and state standards and curriculum, with a special emphasis on the Michigan Curriculum Framework. A supervised sixty-hour field experience is required. PR/CR: Completion of social studies major course-work. CR: EDU 4282. Course fee. HIS 4513 The American Civil War Era Examines the origins, course, and aftermath of the Civil War, with emphasis on the political, cultural, economic, racial, and religious contexts of secession; the presidency of Lincoln; major military campaigns; Reconstruction efforts; and the role of the war in American memory and identity. PR: Sophomore status or PI. HIS 4523 Recent America, 1952 to Present Examines American politics, economy, society and culture in both the Cold War and post-Cold War periods. Major topics include Cold War diplomacy, politics and economics; American affluence and the Great Society; the Civil Rights movement; Vietnam and Sixties protest; Nixon, Watergate and Stagflation; the Reagan Revolution; Nineties prosperity and the rise of the Internet Age and culture wars; and post-9/11 challenges. PR: Sophomore status or PI. HIS 4603 Methods and Assessment Strategies in History and Social Studies Education Capstone course in the secondary Social Studies Education major. Presents research-based methods and assessment strategies for effectively teaching middle and high school History and Social Studies. Incorporates national and state standards and curriculum, with a special emphasis on the Michigan Curriculum Framework. A supervised sixty hour field experience is required. PR/CR: Completion of history major coursework. CR: EDU 4282. Course fee. HIS 4613 Selected Topics in History Special history topics chosen by student or instructor. PR: PI. HIS 4813 Senior Project in History Capstone course for the history concentration in interdisciplinary studies. Supervised research project on a selected historical problem, culminating in a formal paper and presentation. PR: HIS 3813 and PI. HRM - Human Resource Management HRM 3643 Labor Relations Students investigate the intricacies of managing in an organized labor environment. Topics discussed include: the history, methods, and roles of organized labor in the settlement of disputes. PR: MGT 2603. Rochester College Page 167 HRM 3653 Leadership Theory Students study modern and historic leadership theories and their application to management situations. The course also introduces effective leadership and methods of overcoming leadership barriers. PR: MGT 2603. HRM 3663 Training and Development In this course, the student will learn how to: 1. Identify training and development needs through needs assessments; 2. Analyze jobs and tasks to determine training and development objectives; 3. Create appropriate training objectives; 4. Design effective training and development programs using different techniques or methods; 5. Implement a variety of different training and development activities; and 6. Evaluate training and development programs. PR: MGT 2603. HRM 4003 Compensation Management This course will be a comprehensive study of compensation systems, laws and theory including basic concepts of design and methodology for wages, salary and benefits administration, job evaluation, salary surveys, and incentive pay systems. HUM - Humanities HUM 2003 Appreciation of the Arts. Examines the elements, forms, and styles of music, theatre, film, and fine art. Students experience the arts through performance and other forms of creative engagement. HUM 2103 Introduction to the Arts and Sciences An introduction to the major academic disciplines through the reading of scholarly articles from each discipline and through discussions and interviews with faculty from these disciplines. Students will write an interdisciplinary research paper and a personal/academic/career plan. INF - Information Literacy INF 1011 Information Literacy This course introduces college level critical thinking and research skills which form the basis of information literacy. Includes practice in the planning and implementation of research, internet and library database searching, evaluating websites, citing sources, and understanding and avoiding plagiarism. INS - International Studies INS 2113 Aesthetics This course exposes students to major artists, their works, and artistic developments in European civilization. Emphasis is given to the cultural sites and artistic works encountered in the Vienna Study Program. This course is designed to take advantage of the sightseeing and travel opportunities afforded by the international studies experience. INS 2123 Language and Culture This course teaches practical basics of the German language for use in everyday life situations in speaking, reading and writing, and gives necessary information to help students better understand Austrian culture in order to enhance the GEO Vienna experience. Page 168 Rochester College INS 3113 Studies in European Civilization This course examines major political, economic, social, cultural, ideological, and religious developments in European civilization. Emphasis is given to the history, prominent figures, and cultural sites of the cities and regions students encounter on the Vienna Study Program. This course is designed to take advantage of the travel opportunities afforded by the GEO international study experience. MAT - Mathematics MAT 1003 Beginning Algebra Review properties of real numbers and arithmetic; algebraic properties; linear equations and inequalities; graphing linear equations, functions, and inequalities; equations of lines; 2!2 systems of linear equations and inequalities; exponents and polynomials; factoring; introduction to quadratic equations and functions; and applications. May include an introduction to rational expressions and functions. Does not count toward graduation. Required if Math ACT is 17 or below. MAT 1103 Intermediate Algebra Continuation of MAT 1003. Rational expressions, equations, and functions; absolute value equations and inequalities; 2!2 and 3!3 systems of linear equations; radical expressions and equation; complex numbers; quadratic equations and inequalities; graphing quadratic equations; quadratic and rational inequalities; graphing linear, absolute value, quadratic, square-root, and cubic functions; algebra of functions; inverse functions; introduction to logarithmic and exponential functions; and applications. PR: Minimum Math ACT of 18 or minimum grade of C- in MAT 1003. MAT 1203 Survey of Mathematics An overview of the essence of mathematics and its applications for the non-science, non-mathematics student. Emphasis will be placed on the development of critical thinking skills, reasoning abilities, and problem solving skills. Topics may include, but are not limited to, sets, algebra, geometry, consumer math, linear equations, systems of equations, formulas, and application problems. PR (Trad only): ACT of 18 or C- or better in MAT 1003. MAT 1312 Trigonometry Trigonometric functions of angles and real numbers; right triangle trigonometry; law of sines; law of cosines; trigonometric graphs and identities; inverse trigonometric functions; and applications. PR: Math ACT of 25 or above, or grade of C or better in MAT 1103. MAT 1322 College Algebra Equations; inequalities; relations; functions; graphs of functions; composite functions; inverse functions; polynomial and rational functions; exponential and logarithmic functions; systems of equations; Gaussian elimination; partial fractions; and applications. May include sequences, summation notation, geometric series, or mathematical induction. PR: Math ACT of 25 or above, or grade of C or better in MAT 1103. MAT 1334 Pre-Calculus Combines various topics of MAT 1312 and MAT 1322 into one course. PR: Math ACT of 25 or above, or minimum grade of C- in MAT 1103. Rochester College Page 169 MAT 2213 Math for Elementary Teachers I Number sense and numeration, whole number operations, fractions, decimals, computational algorithms, patterns, relations, functions, and informal algebra. Emphasizes content with references to NCTM standards, MDE benchmarks, and materials and strategies appropriate to teaching elementary school mathematics. Satisfies general education requirement for students seeking elementary certification. PR: Grade C- or better in MAT 1003 or Math ACT of 18 or above. MAT 2223 Math for Elementary Teachers II Properties of two- and three-dimensional geometric figures, similarity and congruence, common and metric measurement, introductory statistics and probability. Emphasizes content with references to NCTM standards, MDE benchmarks, and materials and strategies appropriate to teaching elementary school mathematics. Satisfies general education requirement for students seeking elementary certification. PR: Grade C- or better in MAT 1003 or Math ACT of 18 or above. MAT 2233 Finite Mathematics Straight lines and linear functions; systems of linear equations and matrices; Gauss-Jordan elimination; linear programming and the simplex method; sets and counting; probability; mathematics of finance; and an introduction to difference equations and graph theory. PR: Math ACT of 21 or above, or grade of C- or better in MAT 1003. MAT 2413 Elementary Statistics Descriptive statistics; introductory probability; probability distributions; binomial and normal distributions; estimation; hypothesis testing; linear regression and correlation; and applications. May include goodness-of-fit tests; statistical process control; or nonparametric statistics. PR: Minimum Math ACT of 18 or minimum grade of C- in MAT 1003 or MAT 1203. MAT 2514 Calculus and Analytic Geometry I Limits and continuity; differentiation and applications; integration and area; calculus of transcendental functions; and an introduction to applications of integration. May include an introduction to differential equations. PR: Minimum Math ACT of 27 and sufficient high school preparation or a minimum grade of C- in MAT 1334. MAT 2524 Calculus and Analytic Geometry II Continues MAT 2514. Applications of integration; differential equations; techniques of integration; L’Hopital’s rule; improper integrals; infinite series; conics; parametric equations; and polar coordinates. May include an introduction to vectors and the geometry of space. PR: Minimum grade of C- in MAT 2514. MAT 3303 Modern Algebra Concepts of groups, rings, integral domains and fields, and abstract reasoning. PR: MAT 2524. MAT 3333 Algebraic, Proportional, and Mathematical Reasoning Development of algebraic and proportional reasoning as well as an examination of reasoning and proof through logic, conjecture, argument, and formal proof. Also entails an examination of the relationships between the aforementioned concepts. Emphasis is placed on problem solving strategies and concept development. PR: MAT 2213 and 2223. Page 170 Rochester College MAT 3343 Geometry for Elementary Teachers Examination of two and three-dimensional geometric objects using different representational systems, transformations and symmetry, and problem solving involving geometry. Includes technology and manipulatives for the geometry classroom. PR: MAT 2223. MAT 3534 Calculus and Analytic Geometry III Continues MAT 2524. Vectors and the geometry of space; vector-valued functions; functions of several variables; and multiple integration. May include an introduction to vector analysis. PR: C- or better in MAT 2524. MAT 3614 Linear Algebra Systems of linear equations, matrices, and determinants; linear combinations and linear independence; vector spaces; linear transformations; eigenvalues and eigenvectors; inner product spaces; and applications. May include linear programming. PR: Minimum grade of C- in MAT 2524. Recommended PR: MAT 3534. MAT 3624 Differential Equations First-order ordinary differential equations; linear differential equations of higher-order; differential equations with variable coefficients; power series solutions; Laplace transforms; and applications. May include an introduction to systems of linear firstorder differential equations and numerical methods for ordinary differential equations. PR: Minimum grade of C- in MAT 2524. MAT 4503 Methods and Assessment Strategies in Elementary Math Education An introduction to curriculum and standards, instructional and assessment practices, monitoring of effectiveness of teaching strategies, use of visual and physical materials for exploration and development of mathematical concepts, use of technology, research, groupings and cooperative learning in the classroom, planning and preparing lessons using strategies based on current research and curriculum standards, and preparing for the MEAP test. A supervised sixty-hour field experience is required. PR/CR: Completion of math major coursework, Senior status. CR: EDU 4282. Course fee. MAT 4603 Methods and Assessment Strategies in Secondary Math Education An introduction to curriculum and standards, instructional and assessment practices, monitoring of effectiveness of teaching strategies, use of visual and physical materials for exploration and development of mathematical concepts, use of technology, research, groupings and cooperative learning in the classroom, planning and preparing lessons using strategies based on current research and curriculum standards, and preparing for the MEAP test. A supervised sixty-hour field experience is required. PR/CR: Completion of math major coursework, Senior status. CR: EDU 4282. Course fee. MAT 4653 College Geometry Euclidean, hyperbolic, spherical, finite, fractal, and taxi-cab geometries, including applications to real life situations, use of multiple geometry software programs, and some pedagogy for secondary mathematics education students. PR: MAT 2524. Rochester College Page 171 MAT 4952/4962 Senior Math Seminar The history of mathematics as well as issues involved in mathematics education. This includes curriculum, standards, and the professional mathematics teaching community. Includes a look at the roles of both women and minorities in mathematics. This course concentrates on the development of a scientific paper in the field of mathematics. PR: Senior status. MED - Media MED 1101 Print Journalism Credit for satisfactory work on The Shield, Rochester College’s student magazine. Students may serve on the magazine staff every semester but credit is limited to three. MED 1201 Digital Journalism Credit for satisfactory work on the online version of The Shield. Students may serve on the online staff every semester but credit is limited to three. MED 2013 Introduction to Mass Communication Survey of the history, types, and uses of mass communication. MED 2513 Media Writing Writing for news, features, public relations, advertising, and marketed materials. PR: ENG 1123. MED 2613 Introduction to Public Relations An overview of public relations theory, strategy and practical techniques as used by corporations, non-profit groups and other organizations. The course focuses on ways to communicate and promote products, services, images and ideas to various publics. MED 3003 Media and Society An in-depth exploration of the role and impact of media in society. MED 3113 New Media Strategies Exploration and critical analysis of digital and social media and its use by businesses, media outlets and organizations. Includes study about the evolving social contexts created by new media. MED 3323 Research Methods in Media Quantitative analysis of media and media audiences. PR: COM 3013. MED 3513 Public Relations Writing and Visual Design Writing for internal and external public relations, including media kits, newsletters, websites, advertising and direct mail. Includes basic principles of graphic design and instruction on page layout software. PR: MED 2513 MED 4113 Media Law Survey of historical and current legal decisions that shape the role of the media and its function in society. Includes legal philosophies affecting the media and its employees. CR: MED 2013. MED 4323 Public Relations Campaigns and Strategies Designed for the senior public relations major to analyze, develop and implement a PR plan and portfolio for a real world client. PR: MED 2613, MED 3513. Page 172 Rochester College MED 4613 Special Topics in Media Various Communication topics chosen by students or instructor. MED 4813 Senior Project in Media Guided research leading to a major paper in an area of the student’s interest. Also requires a formal presentation at the Academic Symposium. PR: Senior status and P I. MED 4893 Media Internship Supervised field experience in radio, television, or public relations, with application of theoretical knowledge. Includes outside reading and a written report. PR: Senior status and PI. MED 4943 Media Ethics The major issues and perspectives involved in making ethical choices and/or evaluations in mediated messages. Requires a formal presentation at the Academic Symposium. PR: Junior status. MED 4953 Media Seminar and Portfolio Directed study to guide students in the CEL Mass Communication program at the Macomb University Center in polishing their portfolios, completing media studies work, preparing for interviewing, and preparatory lessons in entrepreneurship and business skills. MGT - Management MGT 2603 Principles of Management This course introduces the functions of the management discipline including the planning, organization, and control of an effective operation. Students investigate the role of management in various situations and the past, present, and future of fundamental management principles. MGT 3603 Organizational Behavior Students investigate theories of human interaction within an organization and how it impacts planning, organizing, directing, and controlling the organization. The course provides an opportunity to better understand organizational behavior and communication used to plan, implement, and evaluate organizational processes. PR: MGT 2603. MGT 3613 Human Resource Management This course is an overview of human resources management practices. The course covers organizational change and how human resources fit in the organization. The course also covers human resource planning, information systems, quality and performance management, leadership, employee involvement, and international human resources management. PR: MGT 2603. MGT 3683 Small Business & Entrepreneurship This course focuses on the basic principles of small business management. Key areas of focus will include: entrepreneurship, legal structure, start-up strategies, creating a business plan and operational issues. PR: MGT 2603. MGT 3703 Management Information Systems This course focuses on informational challenges organizations face when engaged in the decision-making process. Key areas of focus include: analysis of information systems, communication theory, flow of information, and methods for gathering, disseminating, and controlling information. PR: MGT 2603. MGT 3713 Operations Management This course investigates operational issues in the production of goods and services with the objective of managing resources in the most effective and efficient manner. Topics include: forecasting, capacity planning, facility location and layout, materials requirement planning, scheduling, and statistical quality control methods. PR: MAT 2413 (Trad), MGT 2603 (Trad & CEL). MGT 3723 Non-Profit Management Critical management issues in non-profit organizations are addressed in this course. Key topics include: start-up strategies, legal status, strategic planning, managing volunteers, budgeting, marketing and public relations, fundraising strategies, and performance measurement. Emphasis will be given to managing ministries and faith-based organizations. MGT 4123 Financial Planning and Control Systems A qualitative analysis of organizational planning and control systems with emphasis on providing leadership in forecasting and budget development, processes, and administration among individuals and teams. This includes examination of the role of budgetary processes in conjunction with development of organizational vision and strategic planning initiatives to involve all employees of the organization. CEL only. MGT 4723 Leadership Seminar Students explore contemporary leadership theories and analyzes, develops, and implements leadership and decision making strategies for “real world” situations. The course will focus on the characteristics of leadership, the manner in which communication impacts leadership effectiveness, and the implications of both effective and ineffective leadership for organizations. This course serves as a capstone course for the Organizational Leadership and Communication program for assessment purposes. CEL only. MIN - Ministry MGT 3653 Leadership Theory Students study modern and historic leadership theories and their application to management situations. The course also introduces effective leadership and methods of overcoming leadership barriers. PR: MGT 2603. MIN 1411 Ministry Practicum Practical experience in ministry in a local church or other religious organizations or program. Opportunities for ministry experiences include: assisting in a youth ministry program, preaching, church education, assisting in a Christian service project, or participating in a short mission trip. A minimum of 3 hours of hands-on ministry activity per week is required for credit. Rochester College Page 174 Page 173 Rochester College MIN 2401/2402/2403 Missions Outreach Internship Extended congregational or mission work during spring break or a summer mission campaign. Credit proportional to length of campaign. MIN 2513 Theology of Ministry Through examination of the biblical narrative (with attention to historical and contemporary texts) students will engage the question of the content and purpose of ministry, with special attention given to developing a theology of ministry in light of contemporary concerns such as gender roles, the place and function of worship, and the question of ministerial “offices,” and ethical issues that pertain directly to Christian ministers. MIN 3323 Introduction to Preaching Pulpit, classroom, and group methods of communicating the gospel. Sermon materials, preparation, and construction. PR: REL 2983. MIN 3333 Introduction to Youth Ministry Explores relationship-based youth and family ministry. Focuses on the youth minister’s role in youth programs, meeting youth needs, and strengthening the family. PR: Junior status. MIN 3353 Religion, Media, and Youth Culture Exploration of the media’s impact within youth and adolescent culture. Includes both negative and positive perspectives on the role of Media (film, television, music, video games, Internet, etc.), the treatment of morality and meaning in media, and the importance of these issues for the life of the church. PR: Junior status. MIN 3363 Family Life Ministry A study of models for ministry to families in churches, with an emphasis on a systems approach to family ministry. Life cycle issues, church programming for families, and preventative planning will be studied. PR: Junior status. MIN 3423 Issues in Culture and Evangelism Explores the biblical, theological, and cultural rationale for evangelism, paying special attention to the questions of content and function of evangelism, and the way the Christian message impacts (and is impacted by) various contemporary cultures. PR: Junior status. MIN 3523 Practical Issues in Ministry Explores the practical activities of the congregational minister, with special attention to the wide variety of ministerial possibilities that might be pursued. Topics include administration and organization, teaching and education, ceremonial responsibilities (such as weddings and funerals), as well as matters of ministerial finance and legal obligations. PR: Junior status. MIN 3613 Pastoral Care Biblical, psychological, and practical guidelines for counseling in a church setting. PR: Junior status. Rochester College Page 175 MIN 3623 The Church and Society Explores the role of the church in society, theological centers that support evaluation of social institutions that call for Christian action, and the proper role of religion in public life. PR: Junior status. MIN 4533 Seminar in Ministry Covers various aspects of ministry, depending on the specialty of the instructor. Might include the history and theology of preaching, of youth ministry, worship, or congregational education. PR: MIN 2513. MIN 4873 Ministry Internship Apprenticeship in a religious organization: preaching, religious education, youth work, or personal evangelism. Requires a written activity report. Permission to enroll in MIN 4873 for academic credit is granted after consultation with the supervising professor and the completion of the internship work requirements. PR: P I. MKT - Marketing MKT 2503 Principles of Marketing This introductory course explores the fundamental aspects of marketing to individuals and organizations. The focus is marketing from a modern business context which discusses each aspect of the marketing mix (product, place, price, and promotion) based upon a market orientation perspective. MKT 3513 Studies in Marketing Studies in Marketing will address the principles, concepts, and practices of marketing products and/or services in business and professional organizations. The course will explore the impact of the marketing mix: product, price, promotion, and distribution on the organizations performance; and addresses the impact of political-legal, economic, social-cultural, and technological environments on the marketing mix and organizational strategic goals. CEL only. MKT 3523 Retail Marketing This course addresses the distribution of products or services to end-consumers. Key concepts include the retail environment, selecting store location, store design and characteristics, merchandising, and retail management. PR: MKT 2503. MKT 3533 Consumer Behavior Students are introduced to the cultural, psychological, and behavioral factors that influence consumer motivation and values in the marketing process. Students will examine consumer decision-making processes and environmental influences on these processes as well as how to use this information to develop, implement and evaluate effective marketing strategies. PR: MKT 2503. MKT 3543 Integrated Marketing Communications Students study communication channels available for distribution of organizational or product information. The focus is on obtaining synergy through the development, implementation, and control of a coordinated communication program, including all aspects of advertising, public relations, sales promotion, and personal selling. PR: MKT 2503. Page 176 Rochester College MKT 3553 Marketing Research This course introduces students to the marketing research processes from problem formulation to the interpretation of the data. Highlights of the course include primary and secondary data collection methods, questionnaire design, sampling plans, and the analysis and interpretation of data. PR: MAT 2413 (Trad), MKT 2503 (Trad & CEL). MKT 3583 Business-to-Business Marketing Given the fact that the vast majority of marketing careers are in the business-tobusiness marketing field, this course explores the marketing process in the sale of goods and services to the organizational consumer. Key elements include: the complexities of buying groups; the use of direct marketing and personal selling; and developing client relationships. PR: MKT 2503. MKT 3613 Customer Relationship Management This course examines customer relationship management (CRM) as a key strategic process within all organizations and serves as a foundation course in Service Management Program. CRM is defined as the overall process of building and maintaining profitable customer relationships by delivering value and satisfaction to the customer. Focusing on process, strategy and technology, this course leads students from understanding the fundamentals of CRM through the implementation of CRM systems and analysis of customer data. PR: MKT 2503. MKT 4513 Marketing Management Students engage in a study of the management of the marketing effort including data analysis, the establishment of marketing objectives, the identification of target markets, and the development, execution, and implementation of marketing mixes. This class serves as the capstone course of the marketing program for assessment purposes. PR: MKT 2503 and senior status. MUE - Music Education MUE 3403 Conducting Basic conducting and rehearsal techniques for directing instrumental and vocal ensembles. MUE 4403 Vocal Pedagogy Scientific and imagery-related techniques for teaching vocal production. Includes history of voice teaching. MUE 4423 Elementary Music Methods and Assessment Study of methods and materials for use in the elementary music classroom, with special attention to assessment of students. Includes a 60-hour placement in a local elementary or middle school. Course fee. MUE 4433 Secondary Music Methods and Assessment Study of methods and materials for use in the secondary choral or instrumental program, with special attention to assessment of students. Includes a 60-hour placement in a local middle or high school. Course fee. MUS - Music *All private lessons have fees of $400 per credit hour. MUS 1011 Private Voice* Private vocal instruction. One hour of credit yields 12 fifty-minute lessons. Numbering accounts for study level: e.g. MUS 2011, 3011, 4011. PR: PI. MUS 1031 Private Piano* One hour of credit yields 12 fifty-minute lessons. Numbering accounts for the level of study: e.g. MUS 2031, 3031, 4031. PR: PI. MUS 1041 Class Piano Basic piano instruction taught in a group setting. For beginning piano students and non-majors. MUS 1051 Private Guitar One hour of credit yields 12 fifty-minute lessons. Numbering accounts for study level: e.g. MUS 2051, 3051, 4051. PR: PI. MUS 1061 Private Strings* Private instruction on orchestral strings. One hour of credit yields 12 fifty-minute lessons. Numbering accounts for study level: e.g. MUS 2061, 3061, 4061. PR: PI. MUE 3411 Instrumental Techniques I (Woodwinds) Playing techniques for woodwind instruments found in school settings. MUE 3421 Instrumental Techniques II (Strings) Playing techniques for string instruments found in school settings. MUE 3423 Production of the School Musical Understanding the logistics and process of producing musicals in schools. Includes practicum in a local school working on a current production. MUE 3431 Instrumental Techniques III (Brass) Playing techniques for brass instruments found in school settings. MUE 3441 Instrumental Techniques IV (Percussion) Playing techniques for percussion instruments in school settings. Rochester College MUE 3603 Technology in Music Setup, design, and operation of computer music laboratory, including hardware and software appropriate to music production and education applications. MUS 1071 Private Woodwinds* Private instruction on woodwind instruments. One hour of credit yields 12 fiftyminute lessons. Numbering accounts for study level: MUS 2071, 3071, 4071. PR: P I. MUS 1081 Private Brass* Private instruction on brass instruments. One hour of credit yields 12 fifty-minute lessons. Numbering accounts for study level: MUS 2081, 3081, 4081. PR: PI. MUS 1101 A Cappella Chorus Choral ensemble performs from diverse repertoire that includes extended choral works, smaller works from classical and popular choral literature, and hymns, patriotic, and Page 177 Page 178 Rochester College multi-cultural music. Daily rehearsal and extended touring required. PR: Membership by audition only. Course fee. MUS 1121 Autumn Contemporary a cappella choral ensemble. Repertoire typically includes contemporary religious music, vocal jazz styles, arrangements of spirituals, popular song adaptations, and hymn arrangements. By audition only. PR: PI. MUS 1161 Community Choral Ensemble Choral experience for non-music majors who are interested in singing but are not able to meet A Cappella Chorus membership requirements. Students may arrange for membership in a suitable off campus, community-based choral ensemble and receive one credit each semester. Subject to music department approval. MUS 3202 Keyboard Harmony Improvisation of simple accompaniment using keyboard instruments. Includes interpretation of implied harmonies. Grade of B or higher satisfies the keyboard skills examination required for graduation. PR: MUS 2223 and four semesters of piano recommended, or PI. MUS 3213 Form and Analysis Structures and forms commonly used by composers of art music; phrase structure and large forms including the fugue and symphonic forms. PR: MUS 1223. MUS 3313 History of Western Music I Development of Western art music from Greek and Hebrew origins through the early Baroque era. Supervised listening lab. PR: MUS 1223. MUS 1171 Concert Band Traditional band ensemble with percussion that performs a wide variety of concert music. Membership by audition only. PR: PI. MUS 3323 History of Western Music II Offers a survey of music from the late Baroque, Classical, Romantic, and Modern eras. PR: MUS 1223. MUS 1211 Ear Training I Entry level study of aural skills; Interval recognition, sight-singing, and melodic dictation. CR: MUS 1213. MUS 3333 World Music An overview of modern and historical music of the world including its influence on culture and its effects on our modern world. Emphasis on introducing the world of ethnomusicology to the student. MUS 1213 Theory I Entry-level study of theory emphasizes written skills related to rudiments of music, including scales, keys, intervals, and rhythm. CR: MUS 1211. MUS 1221 Ear Training II Continues MUS 1211. Triads and seventh chords, sight-singing in ensemble, and advanced melodic dictation. PR: MUS 1211. CR: MUS 1223. MUS 1223 Theory II Continues MUS 1213. Part-writing and chord progression. PR: MUS 1213. CR: MUS 1221. MUS 2211 Ear Training III Advanced study of aural skills. Includes harmonic dictation with more extended harmonies. PR: MUS 1221. CR: MUS 2213. MUS 2213 Theory III Advanced theory, including modulation and extended chords. PR: MUS 1223. CR: MUS 2211. MUS 2221 Ear Training IV Advanced aural skills, including atonality. PR: MUS 2211. CR: MUS 2223. MUS 2223 Theory IV Continuation of MUS 2213. Complex modulation techniques, advanced chromaticism, and 20th century techniques. PR: MUS 2213. CR: MUS 2221. MUS 2603 Foreign Language Diction Latin, Italian, German, French, Spanish, Russian and Hebrew diction and their application to choral and song literature. Emphasizes use of the International Phonetic Alphabet. Rochester College Page 179 MUS 3343 Music in America A survey of the history of music in the United States including Native American music. European influences, and modern jazz and popular music. MUS 4213 Arranging and Scoring Practical techniques of arranging vocal and instrumental music for performance by individuals and ensembles of a variety of age ranges and educational levels. Emphasis on music education applications and popular software packages. MUS 4601 Senior Seminar in Music Capstone course for all music majors. Includes preparation for post graduation life and music program assessment. PR: Senior status. MUS 4623 Senior Recital Preparation and performance of an hour long recital. Required of all performance majors. PR: Senior status. NSC - Natural Science NSC 1002 Earth Science Geology and meteorology, earth’s composition, atmosphere, internal and external processes, and plate tectonics. NSC 1003/1004 Earth Science (1004 with Lab) Topics covered include: Earth’s composition, internal and external processes, plate tectonics, map reading and interpretation, geologic structures, history of astronomy, the solar system, classification and formation of stars and galaxies, and cosmology. Includes a lab component. Course fee. NSC 1003 – CEL only. Page 180 Rochester College NSC 1012/1013 Environmental Science Current environmental issues that contribute to understanding humanity’s responsibility for the earth’s resources. Includes the study of acid rain, greenhouse effect, and toxic waste. NSC 1013 CEL only. NSC 2204 Natural Science Field Study Various geological, environmental, conservation and climate topics are explored in a field study experience. Specific topics covered will depend on the locations visited. Counts as a lab course. Travel fee variable. NSC 2314 Science Foundations I Chemistry and Life Science. Designed for elementary teachers. Atoms, molecules, and matter; plants, animal life, genetics, the food cycle, changes in digestion, and ecosystems. Three hours lecture and three hours lab weekly. PR: MAT 1003. Course fee. NSC 2324 Science Foundations II Astronomy, Earth Science, and Physics. Basic science concepts primarily for preservice elementary teachers. Solar system, earth’s structure, and the laws and forces which govern earth and the universe as a whole. Three hours lecture and three hours lab weekly. PR: Math ACT of 18+ or MAT 1003. Course fee. NSC 3114 Earth’s Waters Range of human understanding and interaction with water from seas, streams, lakes, groundwater, glaciers, precipitation, and the atmosphere. Emphasizes man’s impact on water as a resource. Includes laboratory component. Course fee. PR: BIO 1014 and CHE 1524. NSC 4503 Methods and Assessment Strategies in Integrated Science Education Capstone course in the integrated science education major. Models researchbased methods and assessment strategies for effectively teaching integrated science in elementary grades K-5, and biology, chemistry, physics, and earth/space science in middle school. Incorporation of national and state standards and curriculum, with a special emphasis on the Michigan Curriculum Framework. A supervised sixty-hour field experience is required. PR/CR: Completion of integrated science major coursework. CR: EDU 4282. Course fee. NSC 4612 Senior Seminar Conduction of a scientific research project in consultation with a science-faculty advisor. Includes design, data collection, identifying and manipulating variables, organization and analysis of data, evaluation, and communication. Required for graduation. Taken in the final six hours of the program. NSC 4901/4902/4903/4904 Topics in Science Presentation of paper or project. Four credits maximum. PR: PI. NUR - Nursing NUR 3204 Advanced Health Assessment in the Community Bachelor’s degree RNs practice in a variety of settings and utilize a unique set of health assessment tools. NUR 3304 Pathophysiology Across Cultures Review of various cultures and their distinctive health challenges and potential pathophysiologies. NUR 3404 Integrated Pharmacology Trends Blended knowledge acquisition of holistic, over-the-counter, and prescriptive medications. Current pharmacology trends will be analyzed. NUR 4104 Nursing Research and Informatics Exposure to and use of online databases to survey nursing research that guides evidence based practice. Review of various informatics systems such as the Electronic Medical Record and those used in medication administration. NUR 4204 Holistic Health Promotion Across the Lifespan Mind, body, and spirit health promotion for all ages is explored. Emphasis on the geriatric population and their unique health challenges. Spirituality is multidimensional and has an important relationship with healing and health. NUR 4304 Nursing Management and Leadership The art of exposing without imposing values. Students will engage in activities to strengthen their management and leadership capabilities. NUR 4904 Capstone/Practicum Students are paired or pair themselves with a nurse leader in their chosen specialty for an intensive experience. Emphasize is on service, collaboration, and relationship-based caring. PED - Physical Education Activity courses satisfy the PED general education requirement. PED 1011 Individual Sports Badminton, bowling and others. Course fee. PED 1021 Team Sports Teamwork, communication, and principles of successful team-building. Includes floor hockey, flag football, volleyball, basketball, soccer, towel ball, speed ball, and team mat ball. PED 1032 Stress Management This course is designed to provide the student with the understanding of concepts of managing stress in their lives. Students will be educated on the importance of managing stress, how to identify their stressors and will engage in practical ways to deal with stress. As part of a total wellness program the techniques of reducing stress and methods used to implement these techniques will be helpful to the student in more effectively managing stresses associated with college and life. NUR 3104 Transitions to Professional Nursing The associate degree nurse is exposed to the opportunities and benefits of higher education. PED 1071 Conditioning Basics of diet, stress management, cardiovascular exercise and weight training. Rochester College Page 182 Page 181 Rochester College PED 2002 First Aid American Red Cross Standard and Advanced First Aid Procedures. Includes National Safety Council exam. PED 2003 Personal and Community Health and Safety Personal and community health and safety. PED 2012 Officiating Officiating methods and principles: Officiating objectives, conduct, conflict management, and psychology. Examines officiating techniques for baseball, basketball, football, soccer, softball, and volleyball. Some practical experience through intramural and intercollegiate programs. Health Courses are required by some programs and count as elective credits but do not apply toward the general education requirement. PED 2023 Health and Wellness for the Whole Person A study of major aspects related to human health including the impact of physical activity, nutrition, emotion, spirit and the arts on overall wellness. CR/PR: Any activity course. Open to pre-health care students only. VARSITY SPORTS Rochester College offers men and women several options for intercollegiate athletic competition. Varsity sports taken for academic credit satisfy general education requirements. Each sport may be taken for credit only one semester per academic year. PED 2221 Men’s Varsity Baseball Intercollegiate competition for men. Spring. PED 2231 Men’s Varsity Basketball Intercollegiate competition for men. Fall. PHI 2023 Logic The general goal is to learn how to differentiate good arguments from bad ones. The approach is two-sided: (1) the analysis and classification of fallacies and (2) the analysis as well as the construction of valid arguments. Both Aristotelian and symbolic logic will be studied during the semester. May satisfy the gen. ed. math requirement for Humanities majors. PHI 2933 Introduction to Ethics Introduces students to the basic categories and ideas in the field of ethics; develops a greater knowledge of the biblical and historical materials that inform moral discussion; develops skills with moral arguments found in contemporary (and historical) discussions of ethical concerns. PR: Sophomore status. PHI 2943 Ethics for Health Care Workers Introduces students to principles and methods of moral reasoning. Issues specific to medical decision-making are explored in depth, including end-of-life issues, choices in reproduction, children and bioethics, etc. Designed primarily for prehealth care majors, but can also fulfill the Gen Ed requirements for Moral and Philosophic Reasoning. PR: Sophomore status. PHI 3013 Human Nature An interdisciplinary class. Professors from different fields (such as philosophy, psychology, political theory, and theology) will share the teaching load to consider the topic of human nature and destiny from the perspectives of their different fields. PR: Sophomore status. PHI 3023 Philosophy of Religion A selection of philosophical explorations related to religion and religious faith, such as the relationships between faith and reason, between religion and science, between good and evil, and between different religions. PR: Sophomore status. PED 2271 Men’s Varsity Soccer Intercollegiate competition for men. Fall. PED 2421 Women’s Varsity Softball Intercollegiate competition for women. Spring. PHI 3043 Diversity Seminar A seminar offered on a selected topic relating to issues of diversity such as race relations, non-Western studies, and multicultural dialog. This course will typically be team taught and will provide opportunities to study, experience, and practice diversity. PR: Sophomore status. PED 2431 Women’s Varsity Basketball Intercollegiate competition for women. Fall. PED 2461 Women’s Varsity Volleyball Intercollegiate competition for women. Fall. PHI 3923 World Religions A discussion of major world religions, beginning with “Basic” Religions and covering Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, Sikhism, Jainism, Buddhism, and Chinese Religions. Places Christianity in the global religious context, and discusses fruitful perspectives for understanding different religious systems. Course fee. PR: Sophomore status (Trad); ENG 1123 (CEL). PED 2471 Women’s Varsity Soccer Intercollegiate competition for women. Fall. PED 2741 Co-ed Varsity Golf Intercollegiate competition for men and women. Fall. PHI - Philosophy Courses PHI 2013 Introduction to Philosophy Students will be introduced to philosophers and philosophical ideas, and will explore the value and contribution of philosophy. The class will also have an interdisciplinary flavor which will explore the ways that philosophy relates to and undergirds other Rochester College disciplines including religious studies, social studies, political and economic theory, and science. Page 183 PHI 3933 Philosophy Seminar A seminar offered with a rotating series of topics from the field of philosophy (such as Plato, Aristotle, Modern Philosophy, Existentialism, and African Philosophy). The seminar format will include primary readings, reflective and research oriented writing assignments, and seminar-type class discussions. The course is intended to offer upper division exposure to advanced topics in philosophy, as well as an Page 184 Rochester College opportunity for students to nurture heightened levels of critical thinking skills, philosophical discernment, and writing ability. PR: PHI 2013. PHI 4813 Senior Project in Interdisciplinary Studies Preparation of a major research project in the area or areas of the student’s interdisciplinary concentrations. PR Senior status and PI. PHI 4944 Ethics for Health Care Introduces students to principles and methods of moral reasoning. Issues specific to medical decision-making are explored in depth, including end-of-life issues, choices in reproduction, children and bioethics, etc. Designed primarily for health care professionals, but can also fulfill the Gen Ed requirements for Moral and Philosophic Reasoning. PR: Junior status. PHS - Physics PHS 2014 General Physics I Fundamentals of mechanics, thermodynamics, and sound. Lab includes experiments with motion, mechanics, energy, thermodynamics, momentum, waves, and sound. Course fee. CR: MAT 1334. PHS 2024 General Physics II Magnetism, electricity, optics, light, and atomic physics. Lab includes experiments with circuits, electricity, optics, Bohr Theory, and magnetism. Course fee. PR: MAT 1334. PHS 3004 Astronomy History of astronomy, the solar system, classification and formation of stars, galaxies, and cosmology. Includes laboratory and observational investigations. PR: MAT 1103. Course fee. POS - Political Science POS 2013 National Government An introduction to the political dynamics and capital constitutional bases of the American government. The three branches are examined as they act in concert and in conflict. Several models of decision-making are covered. POS 2023 Introduction to the American Legal System State and federal courts; the Constitution, statutes, and administrative rules as sources of law; jurisdiction and avenues of appeal in both civil and criminal cases. Students read and brief current and landmark cases. POS 2043 Criminal Law and Procedure Major constitutional issues in criminal law and how individual rights are protected in the system. Discusses complex legal issues in the administration of criminal justice in the United States and critical analysis of demands on modern criminal justice agencies and practitioners. POS 3013 The U.S. in the Modern World Topics covered will include world changes as a result of WWII and the end of the Cold War, the role and impact of the U.S. on world trade and the new global economy, goals and problems of the United Nations, and the struggle for civil rights of women and blacks in the U.S. Emphasis is on the ability to engage in library and internet research Rochester College Page 185 and to communicate integrated lessons employing audio/visual and computer technology. This upper division course is built upon key features of K-12 methodology. PR: Sophomore status or PI. POS 4013 American Constitutional Law Constitutional basis and dynamics of the Supreme Court’s lawmaking power. Students read and brief landmark cases. A research paper outlines major constitutional cases regarding abortion, civil rights, or presidential powers. PR: Sophomore status or PI. POS 4213 Substantive Criminal Law Roots of society’s relation to the law and historical and philosophical concepts. Details statutory and case law. PR: Sophomore status or PI. POS 4913 Directed Legal Research Students will research important legal issues, and, under the direction of the professor, will prepare legal briefs and documents. Topics will be custom-made for each student taking the course. Students will present an oral and written report of his or her work at the annual Academic Symposium. PR: Senior status and PI. PSY - Psychology PSY 1001 Writing in APA Style Writing and revising academic and research papers using the American Psychological Association (APA) style. Includes style, structure, organization, references, citations, and grammar. PSY 1403 Preparation for Statistics Introduction to basic statistical concepts, sample data, frequency distributions, probability, central tendency, variability, and hypothesis testing. CEL only. PR: MAT 1103 or 1203. PSY 2013 General Psychology Human behavior, personality, motivation, emotion, intelligence, adjustment, and the social and physiological bases of behavior. personal PSY 2113 Psychology of Adjustment Psychological approaches to everyday problems, coping skills, anxiety, personal growth and health, and interactions of individuals within personal and social environments. PSY 2223 Life Span Development Major theoretical foundations of the development of human beings across ages and cultures over the course of the life span. Emphasis on the integration of physical, cognitive, affective, social, as well as moral and spiritual development. Utilization of developmental research to address the scope of issues during the course of life. PSY 3013 Psychology of Personality Personality theories and the understanding psychopathology, and behavior. PR: PSY 2013. of human development, PSY 3033 Abnormal Psychology Theories related to the development of various mental and personality disorders, including the function of abnormal behavior. Introduction to diagnostics, using the Page 186 Rochester College Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM-IV), methods of investigation, and psychotherapy. PR: PSY 2013. variance, correlation, and regression. Application of statistical concepts to research. PR: Minimum grade of C- in MAT 1103 (Trad). PSY 1403 (CEL). PSY 3043 Brain and Behavior Biology of behavior and mental processes. Behavioral effects of neuroanatomical structures and neurochemical processes. Structure, chemistry, and function of the brain. PR: PSY 2013. PSY 3313 Introduction to Psychological Assessment An introduction to the field of psychological testing and assessment. Emphasis on test theory, construction, standardization and review of assessment procedures; surveys current assessment instruments for measurements of personality, intelligence, neuropsychological functioning, achievement, vocational interest, special abilities and aptitudes. PR: PSY 3013 or 3093. Course fee. PSY 3053 Health Psychology Behavioral and psychological processes and their influence on human health, wellness, and health care. Introduction to behavioral medicine, psychoneuroimmunology, and the psychological literature on cardiovascular disorders, somatoform disorders, and other medical conditions. PR: PSY 2013. PSY 3093 History and Systems of Psychology Historical, philosophical, and scientific roots of psychology and the contemporary models of sociology, psychology, and counseling training. Emphasizes important contributions of major leaders and schools of psychology, and on current issues in the field of psychology. PR: PSY 2013. PSY 3123 Social Psychology Individual psychology in a group setting; social thinking, influence, and relations studied through a review of current research and experimentation. PR: PSY 2013. PSY 3143 Psychology of Religion Religion in classical psychological theories, psychological views on religious experience, and recent research and theory in the field of psychology and religion. Emphasizes integration of biblical and theological studies on psychology and psychopathology. PR: PSY 2013 and Junior status. PSY 3193 Infant and Toddler Development Human development from prenatal growth through the toddler years. Major theories and research related to physical, cognitive, and socio-emotional development and the implications of those theories for parenting behavior and environmental planning. CEL only. PR: PSY 2013. PSY 3203 Child Development Interactive theories of change involved in growth from birth to puberty. Considers physiological, intellectual, psychological, and social change as it is affected by the child’s parents, family, school, and general social environment. PR: PSY 2013. PSY 3213 Adolescent Development Interactive theories of change involved in the growth of the person from puberty to young adulthood. Physiological, intellectual, and social change as affected by involvement in family, school, community, church, and peers. PR: PSY 2013. PSY 3223 Psychology of Adulthood and Aging Sources of psychological growth and crises in adulthood and aging. Changes in intellectual functioning, attitudes toward aging, experience in the family, retirement, needs of the elderly, and death. PR: PSY 2013. PSY 3303 Statistics for Behavioral Sciences Quantification and statistics. Descriptive and inferential statistics, including measures of central tendency, variability, basic hypothesis testing, analysis of Rochester College Page 187 PSY 3323 Research Methods in the Social Sciences Application of proper research methods to specific problems related to the social sciences, including problem identification, development of research instruments, sample construction, variable control, application of statistical analyses, and publication of research results. PR: PSY 2013 and C or better in PSY 3303. PSY 3403 Introduction to Psychotherapy and Counseling A focus on the major theoretical foundations and current approaches in psychotherapy and counseling. Emphasis on the development of listening, communication, and empathetic skills necessary in the formation and maintenance of the counselor-counselee relationship. Analysis of dynamics in the counselorcounselee relationship, interviewing techniques, crisis counseling, suicide analysis, referrals, cross-cultural issues, and ethical problems in dealing with clients. PR: PSY 3013 or 3093. PSY 3413 Substance Abuse and Addictive Behaviors Major theoretical foundations and current understandings of physiological mechanisms involved in the development and maintenance of substance abuse problems. Emphasis on exploring the differences in various drugs in use and their effects on individual functioning. Addresses issues of assessment, treatment interventions, the varied clientele affected by substance abuse problems as well as legal and ethical issues. PR: PSY 3403. PSY 3423 Diversity and Cross-Cultural Psychology A focus on the various aspects of psychology from a cross-cultural perspective. The nature of living in a pluralistic and multicultural society is addressed with an emphasis on issues of multicultural trends and characteristics of diverse groups. The student will examine cultural awareness and sensitivity in counseling and psychotherapy, gender issues, religious variables, and individuals with special needs. PR: PSY 3403. PSY 3433 Industrial/ Organizational Psychology Introductory course in the psychology of work and organizations. Introduction to the use and application of psychology in the workplace. Industrial/Organizational psychologists utilize skills in job analysis to determine required worker characteristics, design of training and development activities to enhance worker performance, understanding stress and well-being at work, facilitating work environments that increase work motivation, job satisfaction, and job involvement, analyze organizational processes and organization development, and develop leadership skills. PR: PSY 2013. Page 188 Rochester College PSY 3503 Cognitive Psychology Psychological and biological processes in human thought, information processing, and decision-making; study of mind-brain interaction; role of computer science, philosophy, and linguistics in the study of cognition. PR: PSY 3323. PSY 4911/2/3 Directed Research in Psychology Students conduct research study under instructor supervision. Literature reviews, data collection, statistical analysis and interpretation, and assistance in research report writing may be included. PR: PI (Trad). PSY 3323 (CEL - 4913). PSY 3514 Learning and Memory Memory, attention, conditioning, and conceptual acquisition. Includes laboratory. PR: PSY 3323. PSY 4921/4922/4923 Directed Readings in Psychology Students read original source material in psychology under instructor supervision. Annotated bibliographies, content summaries, and literature review papers will be required. PR: PI. PSY 3524 Sensation and Perception Physical stimulation and behavior, thought, and experience; Physiology of sensory receptors of all modalities. Also, perceptual processes and characteristics of the visual system. PR: PSY 3323. PSY 4403 Introduction to Career Development and Guidance Examines the theoretical foundations and meanings of work in contemporary society, how people select and adapt to work, and the research methods and counseling techniques utilized in the process of making suitable career choices. Students will become involved in career planning, interviewing, and resume writing as a workshop experience in career development. PR: PSY 3403. CEL only. PSY 4413 Introduction to Marital and Family Systems Addresses the major theoretical foundations in marital and family systems, emphasizing the dynamics and development of marital and family relationships, behavior, conflicts, and relational resolutions. Explores principles of intervention as they relate to family systems theory and principles, multicultural differences, intergenerational and multigenerational issues, family processes, techniques, and professional issues. PR: PSY 3403. PSY 4423 Psychology of Group Processes A focus on the major theoretical foundations of group processes, including the psychological functions of group experience and behavior. The dynamics of group interactions including the concepts of boundaries, decision-making, and interaction. Explores the counselor’s role in group interventions with specific counseling populations, including cross-cultural and ethical issues. Students participate in, and conduct group activities. PR: PSY 3403. PSY 4493 Psychology Field Practicum Requires 300 hours of counseling agency experience. Student must compile a portfolio containing a journal of daily work experiences, description of the agency (including its services and the training it provides), journal article and critical book reviews reflecting 1,000 pages of reading on a topic approved by the advisor, an original paper on the student’s readings and practicum experience, and an evaluation of the practicum experience by the advisor and the student. PR: Junior status and completion of 20 hours of major core. PSY 4943 Ethics in Behavioral Science Reviews ethical standards such as patient rights, confidentiality, and duty to report in the context of professional human services organizations governed by State of Michigan laws. Contrasts philosophies of biblical imperative and humanistic practice. PR: PHI 2933 (Trad). RCC - Rochester Chapel/Convocation RCC 2001 Rochester Chapel/Convocation Every full-time traditional student will be enrolled in RCC 2001 during every fall and spring semester attended, with a limit of eight semesters. Students who attend Rochester College for more than eight semesters will not be enrolled in RCC 2001 and will not be required to participate after their eighth semester. RCC 2001 carries one academic credit with a letter grade assigned to it based on a 25-point scale, corresponding to the number of Chapel/Convocation events attended during the semester. RDG - Reading RDG 3313 Children’s Literature History of children’s literature, assessment of children’s needs; effective selection and use of children’s literature. PR: ENG 1123. RDG 3324 Foundations of Language Arts Applies sociolinguistic theory to language arts education. Integrates the expressive and receptive literacy processes of listening, speaking, reading, writing, viewing, and visually representing as complimentary literacy processes. Creating meaningful, student-centered learning environments. Emphasizes literature-based language arts instruction. PR: Admission to the Teacher Education Program. RDG 3333 Writing Workshop Based on the model proposed by the National Writing Project. Provides opportunities for future teachers of writing to be writers themselves. Exploration of the writing process in a workshop setting. Emphasis on the development of performance assessment criteria in order to respond effectively and constructively to students’ written efforts. PR: ENG 1123. PSY 4893 Psychology Seminar Psychology major capstone course includes readings, discussions, written and oral reports on advanced topics, and related psychology issues. Topics rotate each semester and include health psychology, neuropsychology, child psychopathology, and others. A major research project and final research paper are required. PR: Senior status or PI. RDG 3413 Adolescent Literature Short novels and stories by contemporary writers of literature for young people. Adolescent themes such as violence in society, search for identity, family life, and peer pressure. PR: ENG 1123. Rochester College Page 190 Page 189 Rochester College RDG 4303 Reading Foundations Informs preservice teachers of the principles and processes of reading to develop literacy instruction. Presents a variety of developmentally appropriate instructional and evaluative approaches. Emphasis on student-centered instruction. PR: Admission to the Teacher Education Program. RDG 4314 Content Reading and Assessment Study of the principles, techniques, and processes of literacy instruction needed for elementary/middle school students to be independent, strategic learners in the content areas. Application of principles and practices and implementation of formative assessment during the tutorial clinic portion of this course. PR: Grade of C or better in RDG 4303. RDG 4403 Literacy in Secondary Schools Informs preservice teachers of principles and processes of reading that supports student learning in grade 7-12 content areas. Presents various instructional and evaluative approaches, respecting the diversity and individuality of each student. PR: Admission to the Teacher Education Program. RDG 4503 Methods and Assessment Strategies in Language Arts Education Capstone course in the language arts education major. Application of linguistic theory to language arts education. Models a variety of research-based assessment strategies and methods for effectively teaching elementary and middle school language arts students. Teacher candidates research, design, and implement lessons that meet the state and national standards and gain practical tools to assess student growth. A supervised sixty-hour field experience is required. CR: EDU 4282. Course fee. REL - Religion REL 1003 Introduction to Christian Faith A survey of the central narrative and primary themes of the Christian faith, with a brief discussion of the historical developments and schools of thought that have shaped the belief and practice of the Christian tradition. REL 1013 Survey of Biblical Literature A survey of the Old and New Testaments, with special emphasis given to the historical occasion, literary genre and religious themes of each book. REL 2013 Spiritual Formation A theological and practical introduction to spiritual development through the study of scripture and other works in spiritual formation and through experience in practicing the traditional Christian disciplines. PR: Sophomore status. REL 2983 Biblical Interpretation Combines textual, historical, and linguistic knowledge and skills with sound hermeneutical principles to develop proficiency for logical interpretation of the scriptures. REL 3703 Survey of Church History History of Christianity from its beginnings through the Reformation to the present day. Focuses on the development of various doctrines, including Scripture, Trinity, Christology, Church and Salvation. PR: Junior status. CEL only. REL 3793 History and Theology of the Christian Tradition I Focuses on fundamental Christian doctrines, with a special emphasis on their development through history. Coverage begins in the first century and continues into the Medieval period. PR: Junior status. REL 3893 Special Topics in Historical Theology Examination of a specialized topic in the field of Historical Theology. Topics will include the American Restoration Movement, religious life in the United States, Evangelicalism, the formation of the Bible, and other specializations. PR: Junior status. REL 4003 History and Theology of the Christian Tradition II Focuses on fundamental Christian doctrines, with a special emphasis on their development through history. Coverage begins in the Reformation era and continues into the present day. PR: Senior status. REL 4811 Senior Seminar in Religion Required capstone course for religion majors. An opportunity to discuss among peers and faculty, and to revise, under faculty supervision, previously submitted work from Fall upper-division religion courses. Participation in the seminar culminates in student presentations of papers. PR: any 3000 or 4000 level BIB, MIN, or REL course offered in the previous fall semester. REL 4963 Systematic Christian Doctrine Focuses on fundamental Christian doctrines, reflecting on formative biblical texts, historical development, cultural influences, and the written works of major theological thinkers. PR: Junior status. CEL only. SMG - Sports Management SMG 2223 Principles & Practices of Sports Administration The concepts of sports administration and the four tracks of sports administration: commercial, professional, intercollegiate, and interscholastic are introduced. Students also examine administrative positions and the organizational structures of firms in the sporting industry. SMG 2263 Managing Sports Organizations This course emphasizes the application of management principles and concepts to the ever changing needs of the sport industry and the roles and responsibilities of the sport manager. Focus will be on information technology and the sports media, strategic planning in sports, operational planning and control of the sports organization, organization design and the sports agency, decision making in sports organizations, motivation and leadership, and human resource management. REL 3613 Special Topics in Religion Various topics in the field of religion, as chosen by the instructor. PR: Junior status. SMG 3003 Sports Marketing This course will help students develop a thorough understanding of the marketing concepts and theories that apply to sports and sporting events. The areas this course will cover include basic marketing, target marketing and segmentation, Rochester College Page 192 Page 191 Rochester College sponsorship, event marketing, promotions, implementation of sports marketing plans. sponsorship proposals, and SMG 3013 History and Philosophy of Sports Students are provided a historical study of the development of sports, its role in society, and the philosophical problems that occur. Each student is guided in developing a philosophy related to sports management. SMG 3023 Recreation Management This course provides an in-depth study of the role, organization and management of community recreation programs. Students examine the development of community sports leagues, club sports, youth programs and camps, and game officiating. SMG 3033 Theory in Coaching This course focuses on the concepts and principles of coaching athletic teams of all levels, including the development of practice plans, teaching methods and theories, motivational strategies, recruiting on the intercollegiate level, and coaching philosophies and ethics. SMG 3283 Practicum in Sports Management Students are provided a supervised experience in the sports management industry. Students explore career options, observe a variety of sports management settings, and connect classroom learning with practical application. SMG 4253 Facility Design and Event Management The concepts and principles involved in the process of planning, designing, and operating athletic facilities and the events that are scheduled in indoor and outdoor facilities. This course utilizes the resources available within the Detroit market as real-world examples of the concepts of the course by visiting and touring existing sports facilities. Course fee. SOC - Sociology SOC 2013 Introduction to Sociology Sociological concepts that stress the individual’s relation to society and culture. Sociological theory and influence of religion, education, government, economics, and culture on an individual’s development. SOC 2023 Social Problems Current American social problems including crime and social deviance, poverty, child abuse, environment, race relations, and substance abuse. Discusses treatment of social problems and preventative social planning. SOC 2453 Marriage and the Family Marriage preparation, marital adjustments, child rearing, in-law and extended family relationships, financial planning, and religion. Highlights biblical marriage concept. SPA - Spanish SMG 3613 Emerging Issues in Sports Management This course is designed as a seminar on current and emerging topics in the sports world which are not featured in other courses but worth further exploration based on their potential impact on the sports industry. SPA 1214 Elementary Spanish I Basic vocabulary, grammar, and practice in understanding, speaking, writing, and reading Spanish. SMG 3623 Special Topics in Sports Management This course focuses on topics which are not featured in other sports management courses but worth further exploration based upon their impact in the industry. SPA 1224 Elementary Spanish II Vocabulary-building and complex grammatical construction. Stresses spoken language and Spanish culture. PR: SPA 1214 or three semesters of high school Spanish. SMG 4003 Budget and Finance in Sports Students are introduced to the methods and principles of sound financial control in sports related industries. Key aspects of the course include a review of basic accounting principles and financial statements, sources of revenue for financing, and principles and types of budgeting. PR: FIN 3203. SMG 4113 Legal Aspects of Sports This course is an overview of the legal issues that affect the sports world, the fitness industry, and recreation. An emphasis will be placed on risk management, case studies, current issues, and practical applications. SMG 4243 Ethics in Sports Management This course focuses on the ethical issues related to the realm of sports. Areas of focus include: an introduction to ethical concepts and theories; self-evaluation of one’s philosophy of sports, moral behavior, and management; application of ethical theories and frameworks to the decision making process of sports managers; and the careful examination of ethical case studies involving the sports industry. Rochester College Page 193 SPA 2214 Intermediate Spanish I Grammar review and continued emphasis on oral and written communication. Also, literary and cultural readings. PR: SPA 1224 or two years of high school Spanish. SPA 2224 Intermediate Spanish II A continuation of SPA 2214. PR: SPA 2214. SWK - Social Work SWK 2013 Introduction to Social Work Social welfare field, history of American social services, and issues relating to the field of social work practice. SWK 3003 Human Behavior and the Social Environment Human behavior dynamics and the effect of social environment on individual lifetime development. Biological, psychological, and social perspectives on human function. Students develop a people-in-systems theory. Page 194 Rochester College SWK 3103 Social Welfare and Public Policy Historical, philosophical, and political forces that shape the welfare system’s response to contemporary social needs. Analysis of public policy’s impact on society. THE 2113 Technical Theatre Basic principles of stage design, set construction, lighting, properties, costumes, and makeup in relation to the production concept of a particular genre. Laboratory experience in Rochester College theatrical production. SWK 4403 Social Work Practice I Generalist social work skills and interview techniques in client systems. Use of self in the change process and problem-solving in a systems framework. PR: SWK 2013. THE 3113 Theatre for Young Audiences Explores cognitive and emotional characteristics of young audiences and ageappropriate dramatic material. Exposes variations of dramatic literature for child and adolescent audiences. Discusses performance of literature adaptation as well as text creation from improvised scenes. PR: ENG 1123. SWK 4413 Social Work Practice II Generalist model for problem identification, intervention selection, and intervention approaches for individuals, families, groups, and communities. Highlights ethical decision-making in social work. PR: SWK 4403. SWK 4893 Field Practicum Requires 300 hours of field experience and portfolio that includes a daily journal of internship experience, description of agency’s services and training, journal article and critical book reviews reflecting 1,000 pages of reading on an approved topic, written report on readings and practicum experience, and an advisor and student evaluation of the practicum experience. PR: SWK 4403 and 4413. THE - Theatre THE 1011 Stagecraft Technical theatre laboratory experience. Assigns students to technical role in a Rochester College theatre production: lighting, makeup, costumes, props, or set construction. Assignments based on experience and/or interest and job availability. May require up to 75 hours of work. THE 1021 Performance Workshop Laboratory experience/credit for performing in a Rochester College theatre production. Selection for roles is based on audition. PR: PI. THE 1031 Ensemble Acting Theory and practice in the dynamics of group performance. Requires membership in Pied Pipers. PR: PI. THE 1041 Theatre Practicum Laboratory experience/credit for the following roles in a Rochester College theatre production: Assistant director, assistant technical director, stage manager, assistant stage manager, designer, dramaturg, or house manager. PR: PI. THE 1103 Acting I An introduction to acting including theory and application involving voice, movement, improvisation, script analysis, and scene studies. THE 1113 Movement & Dance An introduction to movement for the actor and an overview of dance styles. Emphasis is on preparation for roles in musical theatre. THE 3213 Dramatugy A study of the practice of dramaturgy, the process of transforming a dramatic text into a performance piece. Students will create dramaturgical plans or “protocols” for campus productions as well as for selected classical texts. THE 3303 History of Western Theatre A survey of major historical periods of the theatre from Greeks to the present. THE 3313 Oral Interpretation of Literature Instruction in analysis and performance of literary genre. Includes oral interpretation of forms such as poetry, scripture, prose, children’s literature, and drama. PR: COM 1013. THE 3603 Dramatic Criticism Critical writing approaches used to analyze both theatre performance and dramatic literature. THE 4113 Directing Process of play direction from production concept to performance. Includes written play analyses, conducting auditions, casting, rehearsing, and working with technical staff. Students required to direct scenes or one-act plays, possibly in conjunction with a campus theatre production. PR: One of the following - THE 1103, 2103, 2113, 3213, 3303, or 3603. THE 4143 Theatre and Religion Surveys the historical relationship between theatre and religion including pagan worship, liturgical presentations and mystery plays. Discusses current conflicting views regarding the role of theatre in the 21st century church, including drama in evangelism (and in the teaching of children), and Christian participation in secular theatre. PR: Any THE course. THE 4813 Senior Project in Theatre Preparation of a major creative or research project in an area of the student’s interest. PR: Senior status and Theatre or Performing Arts IDS Concentration. THE 4893 Theatre Internship Supervised field experience in theatre context with application of theoretical knowledge. Includes outside reading and a written report. PR: Junior status. THE 2103 Acting II Continuation of the work begun in Acting I. Physical, vocal, and emotional approaches to a characterization for a variety of roles in the theatre. PR. THE 1103 o r P I. Rochester College Page 195 Page 196 Rochester College Board of Trustees Mr. James Randolph Chairman Rochester Hills, Michigan Mrs. Ann Luchsinger Secretary Rochester Hills, Michigan Mr. Duane Harrison Vice Chairman Rochester Hills, Michigan Mr. Larry Bridgesmith Nashville, Tennessee PERSONNEL Mr. Clarence Carpenter Flat Rock, Michigan Mr. Gary Carson Dunlap, Tennessee Mr. Bruce Foulk Wayne, Michigan Dr. Robert A. Martin Rochester Hills, Michigan Dr. Jason Menges Brownstown, Michigan Mr. Arthur Pope Bloomfield, Michigan Mr. Richard Stephens Vonore, Tennessee Mrs. Connie Graham Archbold, Ohio Rochester College Page 197 Page 198 Rochester College ADMINISTRATION ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF Rubel Shelly, President B.A., Harding University M.A., Harding University Graduate School of Religion M.Th., Harding University Graduate School of Religion M.A., Vanderbilt University Ph.D., Vanderbilt University ACADEMIC ADMINISTRATION ACADEMIC SERVICES Tracey S. Hebert, Ph.D. Academic Dean Ann Bryan, M.A. Director of Field Placement Deborah Schummer, M.B.A. Director of Online Learning Cathy MacKenzie Advising Klint Pleasant, Vice President, Institutional Advancement, Athletic Director B.S., Lipscomb University M.S., University of Tennessee-Martin Caye Randolph, M.A.T. Coordinator of Student Teaching Julie Harper, M.P.A. Registrar John D. Barton, Vice President, Academic Affairs B.A., Harding University M.Div., Harding University Graduate School of Religion Ph.D., Makerere University (Uganda) Rebekah Pinchback Office Manager Sara Stewart Administrative Assistant CENTER FOR EXTENDED LEARNING Brian L. Stogner, Vice President, Health Sciences B.A., University of Michigan M.A., Wayne State University Ph.D., Wayne State University Debi Hoggatt, M.A. Associate Dean Elton Albright Director of CEL Recruitment Mark VanRheenen, CPA Chief Financial Officer / Chief Operating Officer Doctoral Studies (ABD), Accounting – Louisiana Tech University B.A., Accounting – Harding University M.B.A., Accounting – University of North Texas Tamara Balk Office Manager Essie Bryan Academic and Career Advisor AFFILIATES Scott Cagnet Director of CEL Recruitment Macomb Catherine Hall Assistant Director of Advising Offsites Janet Richards Assistant Director of Advising – Main Campus Fran Smith Enrollment Counselor - Mott Lynne Stewart President, Associates of Rochester College ACADEMIC SUPPORT Brenda Phillips President, Alumni Association ACADEMIC CENTER FOR EXCELLENCE Paula Bonbrisco, M.A.T ACE Director EMERITI Mary Ellen Adams Trustee Emeritus James E. Thomas Trustee Emeritus Robert L. Benham, Jr. Trustee Emeritus J. Robert Utley Trustee Emeritus Oscar R. Glover Trustee Emeritus Lawrence Watson, Jr. Trustee Emeritus Howard Hagerman Trustee Emeritus Donald L. Whetstone Trustee Emeritus Holly Hebert, M.L.I.S. Librarian II Robert J. Seccombe Trustee Emeritus Milton B. Fletcher Chancellor Emeritus Donna Mosley Academic Assistance Coordinator CAREER SERVICES Rochester College ENNIS AND NANCY HAM LIBRARY Alison Keller, M.S.L.S. Director of Library Services Karen Liston M.L.I.S. Periodical Clerk Carla Caretto, M.L.I.S. Health Services Librarian Jeanette MacAdam Interlibrary Loan Manager Essie Bryan Academic and Career Advisor Page 199 Page 200 Rochester College HUMANITIES DIVISION BUSINESS OFFICE Julayne Hughes Administrative Assistant Kim Williams Controller ADMISSIONS Scott Samuels Associate Vice President of Institutional Advancement Eva Callahan Administrative Assistant Jennifer Rokowski Administrative Assistant Brian Bowers, M.R.E. Admissions Advisor Amy Maust Assistant Controller Justin Lewis Admissions Advisor Kathy Anspach Benjamin Muhitch Admissions Advisor Accounting Specialist Sue Grant Payroll Administrator Hannah Springer Accounts Payable Clerk DEVELOPMENT Cathy Ries Development Coordinator Andrew Topie Admissions Advisor Dennis Veara, J.D. Director of Estate Planning Larry Stewart Campus Store Manager, Director of Alumni Relations and Annual Giving Joel Schroeder Admissions Advisor Carol Halsey Mail Clerk Myron Brown Admissions Advisor GRADUATE PROGRAM ATHLETICS Mark Love, M.A. Director, Resource Center for Missional Leadership Klint Pleasant, M.A. Director of Athletics Patrick Hilton Coach, Women’s Soccer Garth Pleasant, M.A. Director of Athletics- Emeritus Head Coach, Varsity Basketball Ron Keen Trainer Lindsey Dunfee Human Resources Manager Keith Keitz Head Coach, Men’s Soccer MARKETING AND DESIGN Clayton Bissett Assistant Athletic Director Head Coach, Golf Brian Thrift, M.Ed. Assistant Athletic Director Head Coach, Junior Varsity Basketball Assistant Coach, Varsity Basketball Jordan Ackerman Head Coach, Baseball Sports Information Director HUMAN RESOURCES Elliot Jones Director of Marketing and Design Justin Lewis Assistant Coach, Softball Jaresha Obey Head Coach, Women’s Junior Varsity Basketball OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT Karen Hart Executive Assistant Steve Ogg Head Coach, Softball OPERATIONAL SUPPORT Joel Schroeder Head Coach, Women’s Basketball INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY David Crump Head Coach, Volleyball Todd Stank Coach, Women’s Soccer Ricky Desotell Coach, Junior Varsity Baseball Harold Watts Assistant Coach, Varsity Baseball Mark Johnson, M.S.B.I.T. Director of Operational Support Eric Campbell Database Administrator Darren McCullough Computer Technician Ming Yu Systems Administrator Rochester College Casey Remsing Senior Designer Page 201 Page 202 Karina Brazle Events Coordinator Shaun Westaway Director of Safety and Security Marty Morrice Help Desk Technician Rochester College HOUSEKEEPING Raquel Esckelson Supervisor FACULTY Kathleen Baker Shawn Gallagher Rochester College features a faculty rich in knowledge and experience. Several professors and instructors teach at the College on a part-time basis while staying active in the pursuit of their respective careers. Some members of the administration or staff who regularly or occasionally teach are noted with an asterisk (*). Part-time faculty are noted with two asterisks (**). John Brickner MAINTENANCE Garry Balk Maintenance Supervisor Jeremy King Grounds Supervisor Darryl Cooley Jeff Fletcher John D. Barton* Assistant Professor of Philosophy B.A., Harding University M.Div., Harding University Graduate School of Religion Ph.D., Makerere University (Uganda) SPIRITUAL ENRICHMENT Adam Hill, M.Div. Campus Minister STUDENT DEVELOPMENT Brian E. Cole, M.A. Dean of Students Director of Integrated Learning Terrill Hall, M.S. Assistant Dean of Students, Director of Intramural Sports Marilyn Schaffer Front Office Supervisor Heather Miller Resident Director, Alma Gatewood Joe R. Bentley Chair, Department of Music, Theatre & Visual Art Professor of Music B.A., Harding University M.M.Ed., University of Louisiana at Monroe D.M.A., Michigan State University Beth Bowers Resident Director, Barbier Debi Rutledge, M.M.F.T. Director of Residence Life Resident Director, Ferndale-Hoggatt STUDENT FINANCIAL SERVICES Kara Miller Director of Student Financial Services Jessica Bristow Financial Services Advisor Elaine May Financial Services Advisor Lori Smith Financial Services Advisor TEACHER EDUCATION Mel Blohm, Ed.D. Director of Teacher Education Program Lynne Stewart Teacher Certification Specialist NURSING Jaime Sinutko Director of Nursing Program Susan Griffin Nursing Program Coordinator ASSESSMENT AND INSTITUTIONAL RESEARCH Mark Manry, M.A. Director of Assessment and Institutional Research Rochester College Sara Barton** Assistant Professor of Humanities and Religion B.A., Harding University M.A., Spring Arbor University Page 203 Vikki L. Bentley Chair, Department of Teacher Education Associate Professor of Education B.A., Harding University M.Ed., University of Louisiana at Monroe Doctoral Studies, Oakland University Melvin Blohm* Director, Teacher Education Program Assistant Professor of Education B.S., Southern Nazarene University M.A., Southern Nazarene University Ed.S., Wayne State University Ed.D., Wayne State University Page 204 Paula Bonbrisco** ACE Director B.S., David Lipscomb University M.A.T., Saginaw Valley State University Craig D. Bowman Professor of Religion B.A., University of California M.A., Pepperdine University M.Div., Princeton Theological Seminary Ph.D., Princeton Theological Seminary David L. Brackney Chair, Department of Science and Mathematics Associate Professor of Physical Science B.A., University of Michigan M.S., Eastern Illinois University Ed.D., Wayne State University Danette Cagnet** Assistant Professor of Business B.B.A., Harding University M.B.A., Harding University Carla Caretto* Health Services Librarian B.A., Harpur College SUNY M.L.I.S., Wayne State University Post-graduate studies Oakland University Rochester College Jeff G. Cohu Associate Professor of Business B.B.A., Harding University M.B.A., University of Arkansas M.S., Eastern Michigan University Ed.S., University of Arkansas Ed.D. Candidate, Eastern Michigan University Certified Public Accountant Sr. Professional in Human Resources Brian Cole* Assistant Professor of Education B.A., Anderson University (IN) M.A., Ball State University Ph.D. Candidate, Western Michigan University James L. Dawson Associate Professor of Education B.S.C., University of Windsor M.Ed., University of Windsor David A. Greer Associate Professor of History B.A., Pepperdine University M.A., Texas Christian University Ph.D., Texas Christian University Holly Hebert** Librarian II B.S., Abilene Christian University M.A. Ed., California State University East Bay M.L.I.S., Wayne State University Tracey S. Hebert* Assistant Professor of Sociology B.S., Abilene Christian University M.A.Ed., University of Alabama Birmingham Ph.D., Oakland University Sharon Heskitt Assistant Professor of Nursing A.A.S., Jefferson College B.S.N., St. Louis University M.S.N., St Louis University Rochester College Adam Hill Assistant Professor of Religion Campus Minister B.A., Lipscomb University M.A., Lipscomb University M.Div., Lipscomb University Doctoral Studies, Westminster Theological Seminary Deborah K. Hoggatt* Assistant Professor of Early Childhood B.R.E., Rochester College M.A., Wayne State University Doctoral Studies, Oakland University Kent A. Hoggatt Assistant Professor of Communication B.A., Abilene Christian University M.A., Wayne State University Keith B. Huey Chair, Department of Bible and Religion Associate Professor of Religion B.A., Lubbock Christian University M.Div., Harding University Graduate School of Religion Ph.D., Marquette University David L. Hutson Assistant Professor of Sports Management B.A., Harding University M.A., Wayne State University Lora Hutson Chair, Department of Mass Communication Assistant Professor of Communication B.S., Oklahoma Christian University M.A., Abilene Christian University Alison Keller* Director of Library Services B.S., Memphis State University M.S.L.S., Villanova University M.A., West Virginia University Page 205 David Keller Chair, Division of Arts and Sciences Chair, Department of Humanities Professor of Interdisciplinary Studies B.A., Lehigh University M.A., Villanova University M.Th., Harding University Graduate School of Religion D. Min., Harding University Graduate School of Religion Pamela R. Light Assistant Professor of English and Communication B.A., Oakland University M.A., Oakland University Mark Love Director, Resource Center for Missional Leadership Assistant Professor of Religion B.A., Abilene Christian University M.A., Abilene Christian University M.Div., Pepperdine University D.Min., Abilene Christian University Doctoral Studies, Luther Seminary Gordon E. MacKinnon Chair, Department of Behavioral Sciences Professor of Psychology B.S., Rochester College B.S., Oakland University M.A., Wayne State University Ph.D., University of Detroit-Mercy Michael Muhitch Assistant Professor of Chemistry B.S., Baldwin-Wallace College M.S., Miami University Ph.D., Miami University Anne Nichols** Assistant Professor of English B.S., Rochester College M.A., Wayne State University Ph.D., Wayne State University Page 206 Larry D. Norman Chair, Department of Business & Professional Studies Assistant Professor of Business B.S., Iowa State University M.B.A., Baker College Linda R. Park** Assistant Professor of Education B.S., Oklahoma Christian University M.A.T., Oakland University Doctoral Candidate, Oakland University Catherine Parker** Assistant Professor of Theatre B.S., Rochester College M.A., Eastern Michigan University Doctoral Studies, Wayne State University Garth A. Pleasant Chair, Department of Physical Education Professor of Physical Education B.S., Lipscomb University M.A., Wayne State University Joseph R. Reddick Professor of Business B.B.A., University of Hawaii M.B.A., Wayland Baptist University D.B.A., Nova Southeastern University Certified Public Accountant Sarah C. Reddick** Associate Professor of Social Work and Sociology B.A., Southwest Missouri State University M.S.W., University of Hawaii Academy of Certified Social Workers Licensed Masters Social Worker, State of Michigan Rochester College Debra A. Rutledge* Assistant Professor of Psychology B.R.E., Rochester College M.M.F.T., Abilene Christian University Rubel Shelly* Professor of Philosophy and Religion B.A., Harding University M.A., Harding University Graduate School of Religion M.Th., Harding University Graduate School of Religion M.A., Vanderbilt University Ph.D., Vanderbilt University Robyn Siegel-Hinson Associate Professor of Psychology B.A., University of Michigan M.A., University of Toledo Ph.D., University of Toledo Jaime Sinutko* Director, Nursing Program Assistant Professor of Nursing B.S.N., Oakland University M.S.N., Oakland University Daniel Sorensen Assistant Professor of Business B.A., University of Nebraska M.B.A., Vanderbilt University Doctoral Studies, Anderson University Certified Public Accountant Gregory M. Stevenson Professor of Religion and Greek B.A., Harding University M.Div., Harding University Graduate School of Religion Ph.D., Emory University Brian L. Stogner* Chair, Department of Health Sciences Professor of Psychology B.A., University of Michigan M.A., Wayne State University Ph.D., Wayne State University Melvin R. Storm** Professor of Religion and Greek B.A., Pepperdine University M.A., Pepperdine University Ph.D., Baylor University John R. Todd** Professor of Political Science B.A., University of Michigan J.D., Georgetown University Gary B. Turner Assistant Professor of Mathematics B.S., Harding University M.S., Oakland University Vivian E. Turner Assistant Professor of Mathematics B.S., Lipscomb University M.S., Middle Tennessee State University Carol A. Van Hooser Assistant Professor of Biology B.S., Central Michigan University M.S., Oakland University Zachary D. Watson** Assistant Professor of English B.A., Harding University M.S.E., Harding University Sara Barton Assistant Professor of English M.A. Spring Arbor University ADJUNCT FACULTY Select professionals serve as part-time instructors at Rochester College. Holly Abolins B.S., University of Michigan M.A.T., Saginaw Valley State University Douglas E. Allen B.R.E., Rochester College M.A., Cincinnati Bible College and Seminary Edward Alef B.A., Walsh College B.B.A., University of Michigan M.S., Indiana University M.S.ES., Rensslear Polytechnic Institute M.A., Wayne State University M.B.A., University of Michigan Stephanie Barry A.A., Rochester College B.S., Eastern Michigan University J. D., Wayne State University Ward Bartlett B.A., Lipscomb University M.Ed., Jones International University Patrick Bevier B.S., Lake Superior State University M.S., University of Missouri M.Ed., University of Missouri Karen D. Bisdorf B.S., Central Michigan University M.S., Central Michigan University David Blanchard B.S., Oklahoma Christian University M.Div., Abilene Christian University Russell H. Bone B.E., University of Toledo M.Th., International Seminary M.A.R., Harding University Graduate School of Religion D.Min., Harding University Graduate School of Religion Rochester College Page 207 Page 208 Elizabeth A. Botner B.B.A., Northwood University M.S., Central Michigan University Diane Bradley B.A., Wayne State University Pete Brazle A.A., Western Christian College B.A., Oklahoma Christian University B.S.E., Oklahoma Christian University Graduate Studies, Rochester College Kelly Brock B.S., Rochester College M.A., Wayne State University Christina L. Broomfield B.S., Liberty University M.A., Vermont College Harry Broomfield, Jr. B.S., Baptist Bible College M.A., University of Detroit-Mercy Ph.D., The Union Institute Michelle J. Brown B.S., Rochester College M.A., Spring Arbor University Sharon Campbell B.S.W., University of Detroit M.S.W., Eastern Michigan University Ted Chudzik B.S., Rochester College M.B.A., Michigan State University Cathy Ciesielski-Kijek B.A., Oakland University M.A., Oakland University Jan Cohu B.S., Abilene Christian University M.S., Texas A&M University Rochester College Cynthia Compton B.S., Athens State University M.A., Sul Ross State University Karen Conner B.S., Bob Jones University M.A., Eastern Michigan University Brett Crawford B.A., Rochester College M.B.A., University of Massachusetts Bryan Crump B.A., Cedarville University M.A.T., Oakland University Anthony Cruz B.I.A., Kettering University M.S., Wayne State University Donna Culpepper B.S., Oklahoma Christian University M.A., Abilene Christian University Douglas Czerniakowski B.B.A., Rochester College M.B.A., Lawrence Technological University Cynthia DeCook B.S., Oakland University M.A., Michigan State University Rachel Delaurier B.A.A., Central Michigan University M.S., Central Michigan University C. Gale Edwards B.A., Lipscomb University Graduate Studies, Wayne State University Leah Ethier B.S., Rochester College M.A., Spring Arbor University Sandra K. Evans B.A., University of Detroit M.A., University of Detroit Ph.D., University of Detroit Sherri Frame B.A., St. Mary’s College J.D., Western New England College School of Law Rochester College Amy Freigruber B.A., University of Detroit Mercy M.S., Capella University Ph.D., Touro University International Michelle Geck B.A., Rochester College M.A., Oakland University Glenn Gilbert B.A., University of Michigan M.A., Eastern Michigan University Leka Gjolaj B.B.A., Walsh College M.B.A., University of Phoenix Clarence Goodlein B.S., Madonna University M.A., University of Detroit Mercy Graduate Studies, Oakland University Richard Gorman B.S., Western Michigan University M.S., Walsh College Wendy Greger B.A., University of Michigan - Flint James B. Grotts B.A., University of Alaska M.A., University of North Texas Ph.D., University of North Texas D. Lorraine Gunn B.A., Southern Methodist University M.M., University of Maine Larry Hammerling B.M., University of Houston M.M., University of Houston D.M.A., University of Michigan Lynn Hartshorn B.A.S., Abilene Christian University M.A., Abilene Christian University Doctoral Studies, Wayne State University Charles R. Hayes B.B.A., Walsh College M.A., Walsh College Page 209 Thomas Hayman B.S., Oakland University M.A., Oakland University M.S., Central Michigan University Post-Graduate Teaching Certificate, University of Detroit Daniel E. Hellebuyck B.A., Wayne State University M.S.A., Central Michigan University Bret Hoag B.A., Oberlin Conservatory M.M., Indiana University Barbara A. Huey B.S.W., Harding University M.S.W., Ohio State University James Huiskens B.S., University of Michigan Flint M.A., University of Detroit Mercy Ed. Spec., University of Detroit Mercy Jennifer Hutchings B.A., University of Michigan M.A, University of Southern Mississippi Ph.D., Kansas State University Mary Irvine Certificate in Vocal Performance, Royal College of Music Connie Jaracz B.A., Oakland University M.A., Sienna Heights University Catherine Jasionowicz B.A., Oakland University M.S., Lawrence Technological University Theodore July B.A., University of Michigan (Flint) M.A., Eastern Michigan University George Kolibar B.A., Oakland University M.A., Oakland University Susan Lechota B.M., Western Michigan University M.A., University of Michigan–Flint Darlene Lee B.A., Grand Valley State University M.S., Grand Valley State University Donald Lewandowski B.S., Wayne State University M.Ed., Wayne State University Shannon Lockhart B.A., Harding University M.A., Oakland University Anthony Luckett B.A., University of Detroit Dearborn M.A., Wayne State University Nancy Keller MacKinnon B.A., Oakland University M.S.W., Eastern Michigan University Judith Matteson B.S., Wayne State University M.B.A., Wayne State University Karen McDevitt B.I.S., Wayne State University M.I.S., Wayne State University Ph.D., Wayne State University Janis McFaul B.A., Walsh College M.S., Central Michigan University Ph.D., The Union Institute Andrea Miller B.A., Harding University M.A., University of Michigan Mary Lou Kata B.A., Michigan State University M.A., Oakland University Page 210 Rochester College Matthew Miller B.S., Rochester College M.S., Walsh College James Murdock B.A., University of Michigan M.A., Michigan State University Kay Norman B.S. Abilene Christian University Cindy Parks B.S., Rochester College M.A., Spring Arbor University Patricia Pfaendtner B.S., Oakland University M.E.D., Saginaw Valley State University Carol Piechocki B.A., Madonna University M.A., University of Detroit M.A., Nova Southeastern University Frank Pitts B.A., Harding University M.M. Candidate, Oakland University Apprenticeship, Michigan Opera Theatre Joseph Rizzo B.A., Oakland University M.A., Wayne State University Certificate of Broadcast Arts – Specs Howard School of Broadcast Arts C. C. Tiffany B. A., State University of New York M.E., Wayne State University M.S.A., Central Michigan University Edith Wallace B.A., Pepperdine University M.S., Wayne State University Ph.D., Wayne State University Donn Robinson B.A., Oakland University M.A., University of Michigan Andrea R. Townsend B.S., University of Wisconsin– Whitewater M.S., University of Wisconsin– Milwaukee Kristen Wesley B.A., Michigan State University M.A., Wayne State University Ed.S., Oakland University Daniel Runey B.A., Oakland University M.A., Oakland University Kenneth Urban B.S., University of Dayton M.S. University of Dayton Todd S. Sager B.M., University of Michigan M.M., University of Michigan Wanda Vandermeer B.A., Oakland University J.D., Detroit College of Law Melissa Schroeder B.A., Oakland University M.A., University of Detroit Mercy Paul Shinsky B.S., Oklahoma Christian University M.A., Marygrove University Maureen Smith B.A., Spring Arbor University M.A., Spring Arbor University Charles Pratt B.S., Rochester College Lisa Sturges B.A., University of Texas M.A., University of Arizona Doctoral Studies, Oakland University Colleen Ranusch B.S., Wayne State University M.A., Saginaw Valley State University Lisa P. Rathbun B.S., Bob Jones University M.Ed., Bob Jones University Rochester College Roger Woods B. A., Pepperdine University M.A., Harding University Graduate School of Religion Hye K. Yoon B.M., Chugye School of Arts M.M., Oakland University Sharon L. Scott B.A., Oakland University M.A., Oakland University Susan Praski B.S., Rochester College M.B.A., Baker College William Jean Randall B.M., Wayne State University M.M., University of Michigan D.M.A., University of Michigan George Willard B.S., University of Phoenix M.B.A., University of Phoenix EMERITI Mildred Eckstein Professor Emerita of Education Steve Eckstein Professor Emeritus of Religion Leo W. Hindsley Professor Emeritus of History and French August J. Thoma B.A., Michigan State University B.M., Michigan State University M.M., Oakland University Sonya Thomas B.B.A., Davenport University M.B.A., Davenport University April Thomas-Powell B.A., Quincy University M.A., DePaul University Page 211 Page 212 Rochester College ITEMS OF RECORD DISABILITY ACCOMMODATION POLICY ACCREDITATION Rochester College is accredited by The Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association (30 North LaSalle, Suite 2400, Chicago, Illinois, 60602. Phone 312.263.0456.). The college is also a signatory of the MACRAO Transfer Agreement, which facilitates the transferability of credits between this and other Michigan institutions. It is the policy of Rochester College to comply with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 in providing reasonable accommodations to qualified students with disabilities. A qualified student with a disability is one who meets the academic and nonacademic admission criteria essential to participate in the program in question and who, with or without reasonable accommodation, can perform the essential functions of the program or course requirements. • Licensed by the State of Michigan Board of Education and incorporated through the Michigan Corporation and Securities Commission. Human Resources facilitates reasonable accommodations and support services for any qualified student with a properly documented disability. A disability is a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities. Written documentation from an appropriate professional is required. Refer to www.rc.edu/academics/accommodations for a complete description of policies and procedures associated with disability accommodations at Rochester College. • Member of the Association of Independent Colleges and Universities of Michigan. / §513 of PA 93-380, Educational Amendment Act, §438 FERPA - COLLEGE STATUS: Additionally, the memberships: college holds the following licensure, approvals, and • Approved by the Immigration and Naturalization Service of the US Department of Justice for the training of foreign students. • Approved by the Michigan Department of Education for receipt of veterans benefits. • Registered with the United States Internal Revenue Service as a nonprofit educational corporation under Section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. EQUAL ACCESS AND OPPORTUNITY Rochester College is committed to equal opportunity for all persons and does not discriminate in admissions, programs, or any other educational functions and services on the basis of race, color, creed, national origin, gender, age, veteran status, religion, or disability to those who meet admission criteria and are willing to uphold its values as stated in the Student Handbook. Rochester College is an equal opportunity employer and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, creed, national origin, gender, age, veteran status, or disability. Based upon this commitment, Rochester College follows the principle of nondiscrimination and operates within applicable federal and state laws prohibiting discrimination. As a recipient of federal financial assistance, Rochester College is required by Title IX of the Educational Amendments of 1972, as amended, not to discriminate on the basis of gender in its admissions policies, treatment of students, employment practices, or educational programs. Inquiries regarding compliance with Title IX of the Education Amendments or any other equal access/equal opportunity law or regulation should be directed to the Compliance Coordinator at Rochester College. Rochester College Page 213 Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1994 The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) (20 U.S.C. § 1232g; 34 CFR Part 99) is a Federal law that protects the privacy of student education records. Parent(s) are allowed to have access to information regarding their children 18 years of age or older provided that the child is financially dependent on the parent(s) (claimed on the parent’s federal income tax return as a dependent). Students who are not a dependent may fill out a form permitting the release of information to parent(s). Parents or students have the right to inspect the student’s educational records and have the right to request correction to records which they believe to be inaccurate or misleading (see website shown below for details). Rochester College may release information from student education records, without consent, under the following conditions: College officials with legitimate educational interest; other colleges to which a student is transferring; specified officials for audit or evaluation purposes; appropriate parties in connection with financial aid to a student; organizations conducting certain studies for or on behalf of the college; accrediting organizations; to comply with a judicial order or lawfully issued subpoena; appropriate officials in cases of health and safety emergencies; and state and local authorities, within a juvenile justice system, pursuant to specific State law. Directory information may be released without consent. Rochester College defines directory information as follows: name, address, telephone, weight and height (intercollegiate athletic team members only), dates of attendance, major field of study, enrollment status, date of graduation, degrees, awards, honors, and student activities. Rochester College will generally not release address or telephone information for students to outside parties except under the conditions stated above or for specially approved institutional purposes. Students must submit a written request to the Registrar’s office if they would like the college to not disclose their directory information. Page 214 Rochester College For more information regarding student FERPA rights see: www.ed.gov/policy/gen/guid/fpco/ferpa/index.htm0l Insert Campus map CATALOG INFORMATION Rochester College attempts to maintain the highest standards of accuracy with regard to the policies and degree programs outlined in this catalog. The College makes every reasonable effort to ensure that catalog changes are made known to students whose educational careers may be affected by such changes. Final responsibility for awareness of and compliance with codes of academic, social, spiritual, and moral conduct is the responsibility of the student. This document does not constitute a legal contract between potential employees, prospective students, or degree candidates. All persons who become members of the College community, either by enrollment or employment, should familiarize themselves with institutional regulations and abide by those regulations at all times. Rochester College welcomes your feedback regarding this catalog. Please e-mail comments or suggestions to registrar@rc.edu or call 248.218.2091. 1 Gallaher Center Campus Store Admissions Office Music Department 2 Muirhead Center Business Office Faculty Offices Financial Aid Office 3 Psychology & Counseling Center 4 Gymnasium Athletic Offices 5 Lake Norcentra Rochester College Page 215 Page 216 6 Warrior Center 7 Maintenance, Security 8 Associates Campus Center Academic Services Career Services Center for Extended Learning Classrooms Faculty Offices Information Technology (IT) Student Development Office Teacher Education Office Rochester College ROCHESTER COLLEGE CAMPUS MAP 1 Gallaher Center Alumni & Development Campus Store Enrollment Services Office 2 Gallaher Center Classrooms Campus Post Office Faculty Offices 3 Muirhead Center Business Office Faculty Offices Student Financial Services Marketing & Design 4 Psychology & Counseling Center 5 Clinton River Trail 6 Lake Norcentra 7 Warrior Center Athletic Department Estate Planning & RC Foundation 8 Gymnasium 9 Maintenance 10 Associates Campus Center (CC) Academic Services Office Campus Ministry Career Services Center for Extended Learning Classrooms Faculty Offices Information Technology (IT) Student Development Office Student Government Teacher Education Office 11 Westside Central Academic Center for Excellence (ACE) Auditorium (AUD; Chapel) CHILL Fletcher Center (Cafeteria) Isom Atrium (Cafe) 12 Ham Library (HL) Classrooms & Library Offices 13 Richardson Center (RAC) Executive Offices Faculty Offices Gardner Science Center RC Theatre Utley-McCauley Student Center School of Nursing Office 14 Gatewood Hall (AG) Residence Hall Athletic Study Lounge (ASL) 15 Ferndale / Hoggatt Hall Residence Hall Dearborn Commons (DC) 16 Palmer Hall Married Housing Housekeeping 17 Barbier Hall Residence Hall 18 Clinton River 800 WEST AVON ROAD | ROCHESTER HILLS, MI 48307 Insert Campus map 9 Westside Central Auditorium (Chapel) CHILL Academic Center for Excellence Fletcher Center (Cafeteria) Isom Atrium (Cafe) 10 Richardson Center (RAC) Executive Offices Faculty Offices Gardner Science Center Nursing Department Richardson Theatre Utley-McCauley Student Center Rochester College INDEX 11 Ham Library (HL) Classrooms Library 12 Clinton River Trail 13 Clinton River 14 Gatewood Hall (AG) Residence Hall 15 Ferndale / Hoggatt Hall Residence Hall Dearborn Commons (DC) 16 Palmer Hall Married Housing Housekeeping 17 Barbier Hall Residence Hall Page 217 A Cappella Chorus ........................ 12 Academic Actions - Traditional ........................................ 41, 130 Academic Alert ............ 37, 41, 45 Academic Appeals .................. 41 Academic Probation .... 38, 41, 45 Academic Suspension ...... 41, 45 Appeals-Traditional ........... 38, 46 Academic Actions - CEL Academic Alert ...................... 130 Academic Appeals ................ 130 Academic Probation .............. 130 Academic Suspension .......... 130 Academic Advising....................... 46 Academic Appeals - Grade, Policy ................................................ 46 Academic Center For Excellence. 43 Academic Honors ......................... 53 CEL ....................................... 132 Academic Policies CEL ....................................... 130 Academic Support - ACE ............. 46 Academic Vision .............................. 5 Acadmics ...................................... 43 Accelerated Programs ............... 127 Accounting Major ....................... 103 Accreditation ........................ 43, 213 ACE Lab....................................... 43 Administration ............................ 199 Administrative Staff .................... 200 Admission Requirements Teacher Education Program . 107 Admissions CEL - Procedures ................. 129 Dual Enrollment ....................... 21 Early Admission ....................... 21 First Time In College Traditional ........................... 19 Guest Students ....................... 25 Home-Schooled Students ....... 19 International Students .............. 22 Financial Aid ....................... 24 Immigration Procedures ...... 24 Transferring Credit .............. 23 Macbook ................................. 25 Re-Enrollment.......................... 21 Traditional - Procedure ........... 18 Transfer Students-Traditional . 20 Adult Education .......................... 127 Advanced Placement ................... 53 Alumni Association..................... 199 American Studies Minor ............... 71 AP Credit........................ 50, 53, 133 Apartments, On-Campus ............. 28 Page 218 Associate of Arts Degree CEL ....................................... 139 Traditional ................................ 60 Associate of Science Degree Traditional ................................ 61 Associate of Science In Pre-Nursing Degree Traditional ................................ 62 Associates of Rochester College .. 199 Athletics ........................................ 12 Intercollegiate .......................... 12 Intramural ................................ 12 Attendance Policy CEL ....................................... 131 Traditional ................................ 46 Auditing Courses ........................... 47 Autumn ......................................... 12 Bachelor of Arts ................ 56, 68, 74 Bachelor of Business Administration ...................................... 101, 127 Bachelor of Science .. 68, 74, 89, 91, 92, 94, 101, 127 Bachelor of Science In Nursing .... 97 Behavioral Science Department ... 64 Behavioral Science Major ............. 67 Behavioral Science Minor ............. 67 Behavioral Sciences Program Admission Requirements ........ 64 Bible Department .......................... 89 Biblical Language Minor ............... 93 Biblical Studies Major CEL ....................................... 141 Traditional ................................ 90 Biblical Studies Minor ................... 93 Biology Education Major ............. 116 Biology Education Minor ............. 116 Biology Major ................................ 95 Biology Minor ................................ 95 Board of Trustees ....................... 198 Broadcasting Track ............ 120, 121 Business and Professional Studies Division .................................. 100 Business Department ................. 101 Admission Requirements ...... 101 Business Majors Core Requirements ............... 102 Business Minor ........................... 105 Business Minors ......................... 105 Calendar ......................................... 2 Campus Description ................................ 7 Facilities ..................................... 7 Campus Hub of Integrated Learning and Living (CHILL) .................... 43 Campus Locations - CEL ........... 127 Rochester College Campus Map .............................. 216 Campus Ministry ........................... 13 Capstone Course - CEL ............. 134 Career and Testing Services ........ 47 Career Services ............................ 17 Catalog Information .................... 215 CEL ............................................ 127 CEL Program Length .................. 128 CEL Program Schedule .............. 128 Center For Extended Learning (CEL) ..................................... 127 Changing Majors Traditional ................................ 55 Chapel .......................................... 44 Chemistry Minor ........................... 95 CHILL ............................................ 43 Christian Ministry Major ................ 91 Christian Values Requirement CEL ....................................... 131 Traditional ................................ 47 Class Cancellations ........................ 15 CLEP Exam .................................. 54 CLEP Credit ......................... 50, 133 CLEP Fees ................................... 28 Code of Academic Integrity ........... 48 College Status ............................ 213 Communication Methods ............... 15 COMPASS Writing Test ............... 50 Computers, Macbook ................... 25 Concurrent Enrollment .................. 48 Concurrent Enrollment Policy ..... 131 Counseling Minor ......................... 67 Counseling Psychology Major CEL ....................................... 142 Counseling Services ..................... 16 Course Changes Traditional................................. 48 Course Descriptions ................... 148 Accounting ............................. 148 Art .......................................... 149 Bible ...................................... 150 Biology ................................... 152 Business ................................ 154 Chemistry .............................. 155 Communication ..................... 156 Computer Information Systems .......................................... 155 Early Childhood Studies ........ 156 Education .............................. 158 English ................................... 160 Film ........................................ 163 Finance .................................. 162 Geography ............................. 163 German ................................. 163 Greek ..................................... 164 Hebrew .................................. 164 History ................................... 164 Rochester College Human Resource Management ......................................... 167 Humanities ............................ 168 Information Literacy .............. 168 Integrated Learning Community ......................................... 190 International Studies ............. 168 Management ......................... 173 Marketing .............................. 176 Mathematics.......................... 169 Media .................................... 172 Ministry.................................. 174 Music..................................... 178 Music Education.................... 177 Natural Science..................... 180 Nursing .................................. 181 Philosophy ............................ 183 Physical Education................ 182 Physics.................................. 185 Political Science .................... 185 Psychology............................ 186 Reading................................. 190 Religion ................................. 191 Social Work ........................... 194 Sociology .............................. 193 Spanish ................................. 194 Sports Management.............. 192 Theatre.................................. 195 Course Load ................................. 48 Cumulative Completion Rate .......... 38 DANTES Exam ............................ 54 DANTES Fees ............................. 28 Degree Change ............................. 40 Degree Completion Program ..... 127 Degree Offerings Traditional .................................. 6 Degree Options Traditional ............................... 56 Degree Planning Traditional ............................... 55 Degree Requirements, Traditional55 Delinquent Accounts CEL ....................................... 137 Traditional ............................... 30 Disability Accommodations .. 49, 214 Division of Arts and Sciences ...... 63 Dormitories..................................... 8 Dual Degree ............................ 40, 51 Dual Enrollment ............................ 21 Dual Major.................................... 51 Early Admission ............................ 21 Early Childhood Studies – Admission Requirements ...... 129 Early Childhood Studies Major CEL ....................................... 143 Education Department ............... 106 Elementary Education Major ...... 109 Page 219 Elementary Math Education Major .............................................. 111 English ......................................... 70 English Education Major ............ 117 English Education Minor ............ 117 English Minor ............................... 70 Ennis and Nancy Ham Library ....... 8 Equal Access and Opportunity... 213 Faculty ....................................... 204 FAFSA .......................................... 36 FERPA - Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1994 ........ 214 Final Exams - Traditional ............. 52 Finance Minor ............................ 105 Financial Aid .... 30, 35, 48, 137, 216 Appeal Process ........................ 39 Duration of Eligibility .................. 39 FAFSA ..................................... 36 Federal Direct Plus Loan ........ 40 Federal Direct Stafford Loan ... 40 Federal Perkins Loan .............. 40 Federal Work Study ................ 41 Institutional Discounts and Scholarships ...................... 41 Loans ....................................... 40 Off-Campus Employment........ 41 Scholarship Information .......... 42 Scholarship .............................. 35 Sources of Aid .......................... 41 Financial Aid Withdrawal Policy ...... 32 Title IV Aid............................... 32 Financial Information.................... 27 Fees - Traditional .................... 27 Room & Board - Traditional .... 27 Tuition CEL .................................. 135 Traditional .................... 27, 30 First Time In College Traditional ................................ 19 Foreign Language ........................ 70 General Education Program American Experience .............. 58 Christian Values ...................... 57 Communication and Speech ... 57 Critical Thinking and Mathematical Competency 57 English Compostion ................ 57 Fine Arts Appreciation............. 58 Foreign Language ................... 57 Health and Fitness .................. 58 Human Institutions and Behavior ........................................... 58 Information Literacy ................ 57 Laboratory Science ................. 58 Literature ................................. 58 Moral and Philosophical Reasoning .......................... 57 Page 220 Non-Western Studies and Diversity .............................. 58 Western Heritage .................... 58 General Education Requirements CEL ........................................ 139 Traditional .......................... 57, 59 General Science Minor ................. 95 GEO ............................................. 52 Global Educational Opportunities . 52 GPA .............................................. 37 Grade Requirement – Comp A and B .............................................. 51 Grades .......................................... 52 Graduate School of Religion ............. 7 Graduation .................................... 53 Graphic Design Track ......... 120, 121 Greek Minor .................................. 93 Guest Students ............................. 25 Ham Library .................................... 8 Health Insurance .......................... 17 Health Sciences Major ................. 96 Heritage of Rochester College ....... 6 History .......................................... 71 History Education Minor ............... 119 History Minor ................................ 71 Home-Schooled Students ............ 19 Honor Societies ............................. 12 Psi Chi ..................................... 65 Human Resource Minor ............. 105 Humanities Department ................ 68 Humanities Major ......................... 69 Humanities Minor ......................... 70 Incomplete Courses ..................... 51 Independent Study Courses ......... 51 Information Literacy RequirementTraditional ................................ 51 Integrated Learning Community (ILC) ................................................ 43 Integrated Science Education Major .............................................. 112 Interdisciplinary Concentrations Business Concentration .......... 80 Communication Concentration 83 General Science Concentration ............................................ 80 History Concentration .............. 81 International Studies Concentration ..................... 81 Literature and Writing Concentration ..................... 82 Literature Concentration .......... 82 Mathematics Concentration ..... 83 Music Concentration ................ 83 Performing Arts Concentration 84 Pre-Law Concentration ............ 85 Pre-Med Concentration ........... 85 Rochester College Pre-Physician’s Assistant Concentration ..................... 85 Professional Writing Concentration ..................... 86 Psychology Concentration ....... 86 Religion Concentration ............ 87 Theatre Concentration ............. 87 Interdisciplinary Studies ............... 74 Interdisciplinary Studies Major . 75, 76, 77 Interdisciplinary Studies With Honors ..................................... 78 International Students ................... 22 Financial Aid ............................ 24 Transferring Credit ................... 23 International Studies Minor ........... 79 Introduction ...................................... 5 Items of Record .......................... 213 Language Arts Education Major . 113 Library ............................................ 8 Library - Ennis & Nancy Ham Library ..................................... 49 Loans .................... 8, 32, 33, 40, 137 Macomb Community College University Center ........... 125, 127 MACRAO Agreement ........... 43, 213 Majors -Traditional ........................ 56 Management Major CEL ....................................... 140 Financial Management Concentration ................... 104 Human Resource Management Concentration ................... 104 Marketing Management Concentration ................... 104 Traditional .............................. 103 Management Minor .................... 105 Marketing Minor .......................... 105 Mass Communication Department .............................................. 120 Mass Communication Major CEL ....................................... 144 Traditional .............................. 121 Mass Communication Major, Media and Communication Arts CEL ....................................... 145 Traditional .............................. 124 Mass Communication Major, Public Relations CEL ....................................... 146 Math Education Major ................ 118 Mathematics Department ............. 94 Mathematics Minor ....................... 95 Media Minor ................................ 123 Military .......................................... 32 Military Benefits ............................ 41 Military Information ....................... 32 Rochester College Mission of Rochester College ........... 5 Mott Community College University Center ................................... 127 Music............................................ 72 Music Minor.................................. 72 Nontraditional Credit ............ 53, 132 Nursing Department ..................... 97 Admission Requirements ........ 97 Nursing Major............................... 99 Oakland Community College ..... 125 Online / Web-Enhanced Courses .............................................. 133 Organizational Leadership and Communication Major CEL ....................................... 147 Paying for College........................ 27 Payment Options CEL ....................................... 136 Traditional ............................... 29 Personnel ................................... 197 Philosophy ................................... 74 Philosophy Minor ......................... 79 Physical Education Department ... 88 Political Science ........................... 71 Pre-Law Minor.............................. 71 Pre-Med Concentration.................. 75 Pre-Physician’s Assistant Concentration ........................... 76 Professional Writing Minor ........... 70 Program Evaluation - CEL ......... 134 Psi Chi.......................................... 65 Psychology Major......................... 66 Psychology Minor .......................... 67 Public Relations Minor ............... 123 Public Relations Track ....... 120, 121 Re-Enrollment............................... 21 Refunds and Credits CEL ....................................... 137 Traditional ......................... 30, 31 Registration Traditional ............................... 54 Registration and Drop Deadline CEL ....................................... 134 Religion Department .................... 89 Religion Minor ............................... 93 Repeated Courses ................... 39, 54 Residence Halls ....................... 8, 16 Residency Requirement CEL ....................................... 134 Traditional ............................... 19 Returning Students ...................... 54 CEL ....................................... 130 RN to BSN Program..................... 97 RN-BSN Major ............................. 99 Rochester Community Chorus ...... 12 Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy ................................................ 36 Page 221 Scholarships.................................. 35 Science Department .................... 94 Secondary Education Major ....... 115 Secondary Mathematics Education Minor ..................................... 118 Semester Payment Plan CEL ....................................... 136 Shield, The ................................. 121 Social Regulations ....................... 15 Social Science Minor ................... 71 Social Studies Education Major 114, 119 Social Work Minor ........................ 67 Social Work Track ........................ 67 Special Courses ........................... 54 Specs Howard School of Broadcast Arts........................ 120, 127, 144 Sports Management Major......... 104 Sports Management Minor......... 105 Student Groups............................. 11 Honor Societies........................ 12 Music Ensembles ..................... 11 Residence Life ......................... 11 Student Government ................ 11 Student Publications................. 12 Theatre .................................... 12 Student Life ................................... 11 Academic Symposium ............. 11 Celebration.............................. 11 Homecoming ........................... 11 Honor Societies....................... 12 Social Clubs ............................ 12 Student Publications ................... 121 Page 222 Student Teaching ....................... 108 Teacher Certification .................. 106 Teacher Education Department . 106 Technical and Professional Studies Department ............................ 125 Technical and Professional Studies Major ..................................... 126 Theatre ................................... 12, 72 Theatre Minor ............................... 73 The Shield ..................................... 12 Transcripts .................................... 54 Transfer Credit ............................... 40 Transfer Students CEL ....................................... 130 Traditional ................................ 20 Tuition - Traditional ................. 27, 30 Tuition and Fees CEL ....................................... 135 Tuition Voucher CEL ....................................... 136 Upper-Division Requirement ...... 134 Veteran’s Benefits ........................ 41 Visual Arts .................................... 72 Withdrawal from Classes .............. 47 CEL ....................................... 134 Traditional ................................ 32 Withdrawing From College Traditional ................................. 30 Writing Proficiency Requirement CEL ....................................... 133 Traditional ................................ 49 Youth and Family Ministry Major .. 92 Youth and Family Ministry Minor .. 93 Rochester College Rochester College Page 223 ...
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