PHOTOSYNTHESIS TEST STUDY GUIDE - PHOTOSYNTHESIS TEST STUDY...

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PHOTOSYNTHESIS TEST STUDY GUIDE 1. Discuss and describe the function/role of the following molecules in photosynthesis: 2. Glucose 3. Chlorophyll 4. NADP 5. ATP 6. O2 7. CO2 8. H2O 9. H+ 1. Discuss differences in the energy stored in CO2, H2O and glucose. 1. Discuss and describe (it is helpful to practice drawing flow charts or diagrams) the reactions that take place during the light reactions of photosynthesis. 1. Discuss and describe (it is helpful to practice drawing flow charts or diagrams) the reactions that take place during the Calvin cycle and how the cycle is connected to the light reactions. 1. Discuss and describe the main function/s of photosynthesis 1. Describe and discuss the effect of environmental factors on the rate of photosynthesis. 1. Discuss and describe the relationship between photosynthesis and radiation wavelength (color). 1. Be able to draw and name the different parts of a chloroplast and the function of these components. 1. Describe and discuss the different parts of a leaf. Features of C4 plants. Glucose: Glucose is the First product in photosynthesis. Glucose is a three compound call glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate. Almost immediately, two of these join to form a glucose molecule. The Glucose is Oxidized in the process called respiration to produce energy for the internal functions of the
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plant. If excess glucose is produced it is stored in various places of the plant (depending on the species) in the form of starch Chlorophyll: Chlorophyll is the molecule that traps this 'most elusive of all powers' - and is called a photoreceptor. It is found in the chloroplasts of green plants, and is what makes green plants, green. The basic structure of a chlorophyll molecule is a porphyrin ring, co-ordinated to a central atom. This is very similar in structure to the heme group found in hemoglobin, except that in heme the central atom is iron, whereas in chlorophyll it is magnesium. There are actually 2 main types of chlorophyll, named a and b . They differ only slightly, in the composition of a side chain (in a it is -CH3, in b it is CHO). Both of these two chlorophylls are very effective photoreceptors because they contain a network of alternating single and double bonds, and the orbital can delocalize stabilizing the structure. Such delocalized polyenes have very strong absorption bands in the visible regions of the spectrum, allowing the plant to absorb the energy from sunlight. The chlorophyll molecule is the active part that absorbs the sunlight, but just as with hemoglobin, in order to do its job (synthesizing carbohydrates) it needs to be attached to the backbone of a very complicated protein. This protein may look haphazard in design, but it has exactly the correct structure to orient the chlorophyll molecules in the optimal position to enable them to react with nearby CO2 and H2O molecules in a very efficient manner. Several chlorophyll molecules are lurking inside this bacterial photoreceptor protein (right). NADP:
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PHOTOSYNTHESIS TEST STUDY GUIDE - PHOTOSYNTHESIS TEST STUDY...

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