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ElectronicStudyGuide - Electronics Design and Technology...

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Electronics- Design and Technology Ohms’s Law Describes the relationship between current, voltage, and resistance. Current is directly related to the voltage Current is inversely related to the resistance V= IR is the formulaic representation of Ohm’s Law Voltage = Current x Resistance Current = Voltage/ Resistance Resistance = Voltage/ Current Charge is a representation of the amount of electrons present in a material. The symbol for Charge (in a formula) is q . Charge is the measure in Coulombs (C) One Coulomb of charge is 6.28 x10 18 electrons The Resistance of a wire is affected by four factors LENGTH OF WIRE MATERIAL OF WIRE CROSS-SECTIONAL AREA OF WIRE TEMPERATURE OF WIRE Resistance is directly related to the length of the wire Resistance is inversely related to the area of a wire The symbol for Resistance (in formula) is R. Resistance is measured in Ohms (Ω) Voltage is “electric pressure” Voltage results from the build up charge in a particular location With voltage it is possible to have a large voltage without having a large amount of Charge The symbol for Voltage (in a formula) is E or V Voltage is measured in Volts (V) Ground is an area of zero electric pressure (0 V) Ground is an infinite acceptor and donor of electrons In a circuit without ground, the negative terminal of the battery is assumed to be ground Current is the movement of charge Current describes the number of electrons that pass a point in a given interval of time The symbol for Current (in a formula) is I Current is measured in Amps (A) Essential Knowledge
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Electronics- Design and Technology Materials are classified based upon how well they allow electrons to pass through them Conductors allow electrons to pass through them easily Semiconductors do not allow electrons to pass through easily Insulators do not
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