FrontlineChpt3

FrontlineChpt3 - knowledge to combat hunger Chapter 3...

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Unformatted text preview: knowledge to combat hunger Chapter 3 understanding malnutrition: 68 Frontline Issues in Nutrition Assistance T It is tempting to see hunger as strictly an issue of quantity. People who are hungry don’t have enough food, so let’s get them more to eat, right? Margaret W. Nea The solution isn’t always that simple. It is important to understand that the quality of food also matters. Human health depends on an adequate supply of vitamins and minerals. Food that lacks nutritional value may quiet the pangs of hunger and provide temporary relief, but over the long term not getting adequate amounts of nutritious food has serious health consequences. Malnutrition results when there is an imbalance between what the body needs to maintain health and the intake of nutrients to meet those needs. In the developing world, more than 800 million people remain food insecure, meaning they do not get a suffi cient amount of calories to meet the basic physical requirements for a healthy, active life. 1 T ese are the hungry we recognize from television and newspaper photographs—bloated-bellied children suF ering from a lack of protein, or emaciated rail-thin mothers and fathers. T ese images are how most people see the problem of “world hunger.” But there are also the hidden hungry, an additional 1.2 billion people who suF er from chronic vitamin and mineral de¡ ciencies (the 800 million cited above are also vitamin and mineral de¡ cient). T ey actually get enough calo- ries to survive from day to day, 2 so they are not counted as starving. Enough food to survive, but not enough to thrive: the hidden hungry may not look the worse for wear, but their lack of essential nutrients has profound eF ects on their health and quality of life. Lacking essential vitamins and minerals, the body cannot produce the enzymes, hormones and other substances it needs to function normally. De¡ cits lead to poor health and impaired mental functioning. Severe de¡ cits can even cause death. EF ective nutrition assistance depends on much more than simply the quan- tity of food delivered. In this chapter, we examine the relationship between hunger and nutrition. Understanding the nutritional status of hungry people creates a foundation for improving frontline responses to hunger, both in the developing world and the United States. Hunger Report 2006 69 chapter 3 malnutrition Types of Hunger • Chronic hunger – occurs when people do not get sufFcient nutrition (i.e., they suffer from under- nourishment but are not starving) throughout the year or on a seasonal basis. Chronic hunger results in children who suffer from chronic undernutrition (stunting) and high rates of child mortality due to hunger- related diseases....
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This note was uploaded on 10/24/2011 for the course POLS POLS 333 taught by Professor Evans during the Winter '11 term at Cal Poly.

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FrontlineChpt3 - knowledge to combat hunger Chapter 3...

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