Eliminating Capital Punishment 1

Eliminating Capital - Eliminating Capital Punishment 1 Eliminating Capital Punishment Tyisha R Jackson PHI200 Mind and Machine(GSI1125J Instructor

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Eliminating Capital Punishment 1 Eliminating Capital Punishment Tyisha R. Jackson PHI200: Mind and Machine (GSI1125J) Instructor Doug Stave July 17, 2011 Eliminating Capital Punishment 2 Eliminating Capital punishment If asked whether or not I thought the United states should continue the practice of capital punishment, my answer would be a solemn no, as I believe the death penalty is a violation of one’s human right to live. A central principle of a just society is that every person has an equal right to “life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness”. And While I feel that capital punishment is an unfair administration that is inflicted disproportionately amongst the poor and minorities as a form of social control, rather than the government attempting social reform, I will provide reasons for the support of the death penalty while offering my own reasons to refute it. Only 58 countries worldwide still enforce the death penalty, but it is still largely accepted here in the United States. According to the Death Penalty Information Center, nearly 85% of executions take place in the south, with Texas being accountable for half of them. In September 2000, the Texas Civil Rights Project sent out a newsletter that was highly critical of the Texas judicial system. The critiques that follow are likely applicable to the majority of states in the United States who still execute prisoners:
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The defense lawyers are often incompetent. Judges sometimes appoint friends or political associates. Other times, no competent lawyer is willing to accept the case because of the poor compensation paid. District attorneys are given " unrestricted discretion " in deciding whether to seek the death penalty. Poor people, and members of minority groups are more likely to be targeted because of prejudice and bigotry. Jurors who may support the death penalty, but have reservations about its use, are eliminated from jury duty. Jurors are often not given the option of a life-without-parole sentence in murder Eliminating Capital Punishment 3 cases. The appeal process has " burdensome, if not impossible, procedures ." The process seems designed to speed cases along rather than grant justice. The rules appear to be in flux: the highest appeals court in the state reversed about one out of every three capital sentences prior to 1995. Since 1995, this has reduced to less than 3%. The operation of the Board of Pardons and Paroles in Texas is severely flawed. They do not meet as a group to study evidence and discuss a case. Individual members are sent stacks of documents, and make their decisions via telephone or fax. (" The Death Penalty in Texas ," the Texas Civil Rights Project, Sept. 2000). If
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This note was uploaded on 10/23/2011 for the course ANT101 ANT101 taught by Professor Nancy during the Spring '10 term at Ashford University.

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Eliminating Capital - Eliminating Capital Punishment 1 Eliminating Capital Punishment Tyisha R Jackson PHI200 Mind and Machine(GSI1125J Instructor

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