Week 7 Assignment Deserts Glaciers and Climate

Week 7 Assignment Deserts Glaciers and Climate - Deserts,...

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Deserts, Glaciers, and Climate SCI-245 July 10, 2011
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It is no great mystery that the Earth is always changing. Talk of global warming is inescapable, making it a moral imperative to become educated about the Earth’s climate cycles and watch for changes and signs in Earth’s diverse landscapes. The following is a brief sketch of desert and glacial landscapes, as well as a look at historical and future climate changes. Desert and glacial landscapes are very much on opposite sides of the landscape spectrum, however in terms of adjective depiction they are related: “abstract, beautiful, immense, remote, and vulnerable” (Murck, Skinner, & Mackenzie, 2008, p. 376). The desert landscapes are primarily fashioned by wind and sand, however they are truly defined by the region’s annual rainfall. The landscapes in the desert are full of sand, alluvial fans, playas, oases, arroyos as well as deposits of salt. Eolian, better known as wind erosion, is the type of erosion seen in the desert. Deserts are constantly altered and changing based on the direction of the wind. A highly noticeable example of a changing geological feature in a desert landscape would be the dunes. Dunes are hills or ridges of sand that are produced when the wind blows. These mounds of sand are irregular, yet they come in five common types, barchan, transverse, star, parabolic, and longitudinal. One way that deserts form is by desertification, the movement of desert conditions into non-
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desert regions such as the case in Northern China (China Desert, n.d). With areas like that of Northern China in a delicate balancing act to maintain its ecosystem, even minor stresses by human (anthropogenic) or natural forces can become too much to tolerate, thus a degradation of the land results. According to Murck et al. (2008), “the majority of desert lands
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Week 7 Assignment Deserts Glaciers and Climate - Deserts,...

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