5 - Chapter 5 The Microprocessor and its Architecture 1...

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1 Chapter 5 The Microprocessor and its Architecture
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2 Chapter 5 - The Microprocessor and its Architecture KUEU 2143 Microcomputer and Digital systems Learning Outcomes Be able to describe the function and purpose of each program-visible register. Be able to detail the flag register and the purpose of each flag bit. Be able to describe how memory is accessed using real mode and protected mode.
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3 Chapter 5 - The Microprocessor and its Architecture KUEU 2143 Microcomputer and Digital systems Programming Model 8086 through Core2 considered program visible. registers are used during programming and are specified by the instructions Other registers considered to be program invisible. not addressable directly during applications programming 80286 and above contain program-invisible registers to control and operate protected memory . 80386 through Core2 microprocessors contain full 32-bit internal architectures. 8086 through the 80286 are fully upward-compatible to the 80386 through Core2.
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4 Chapter 5 - The Microprocessor and its Architecture KUEU 2143 Microcomputer and Digital systems Figure 2 1 The programming model of the 8086 through the Core2 microprocessor including the 64-bit extensions.
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5 Chapter 5 - The Microprocessor and its Architecture KUEU 2143 Microcomputer and Digital systems Programming Model The earlier 8086, 8088 and 80286 contain 16-bit internal architectures. The programming model contains 8-, 16- and 32-bit registers. The Pentium 4 and Core2 contain 64-bit registers when operated in 64-bit mode. There are 3 types of registers: general purpose/multipurpose, special purpose and segment registers. The multipurpose registers include Accumulator (A), Base Index (B), Count (C), Data (D), Base Pointer (BP), Destination Index (DI), Source Index (SI). These registers hold various data sizes (bytes, words, doublewords) and are used for almost any purposes as dedicated by a program.
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6 Chapter 5 - The Microprocessor and its Architecture KUEU 2143 Microcomputer and Digital systems Multipurpose Registers RAX - a 64-bit register (RAX), a 32-bit register (accumulator) (EAX), a 16-bit register (AX), or as either of two 8-bit registers (AH and AL). The accumulator is used for instructions such as multiplication, division, and some of the adjustment instructions. RBX- addressable as RBX, EBX, BX, BH, BL. BX register (base index) sometimes holds offset address of a location in the memory system in all versions of the microprocessor RCX- as RCX, ECX, CX, CH, or CL. a (count) general-purpose register that also holds the count for various instructions
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7 Chapter 5 - The Microprocessor and its Architecture KUEU 2143 Microcomputer and Digital systems Multipurpose Registers RDX - as RDX, EDX, DX, DH, or DL. a
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This note was uploaded on 10/23/2011 for the course BME KUEU taught by Professor Ting during the Fall '10 term at Universiti Teknologi Malaysia.

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5 - Chapter 5 The Microprocessor and its Architecture 1...

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