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092611ClimateChangeAllergy

092611ClimateChangeAllergy - The American'allergy to global...

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The American 'allergy' to global warming: Why? Link in e-newsletter from R&D [email protected] The American 'allergy' to global warming: Why? Posted In: R&D Daily | Atmospheric Sciences | Carbon Footprint | Climate | Environmental Policy | Global Climate Change | Research | Atmospheric Sciences | Climate | Test & Measurement | NASA (General) By Charles J. Hanley, AP Special Correspondent Monday, September 26, 2011 In-depth R&D news and innovations - Sign up now! NEW YORK (AP) — Tucked between treatises on algae and prehistoric turquoise beads, the study on page 460 of a long-ago issue of the U.S. journal Science drew little attention. "I don't think there were any newspaper articles about it or anything like that," the author recalls. But the headline on the 1975 report was bold: "Are We on the Brink of a Pronounced Global Warming?" And this article that coined the term may have marked the last time a mention of "global warming" didn't set off an instant outcry of angry denial. In the paper, Columbia University geoscientist Wally Broecker calculated how much carbon dioxide would accumulate in the atmosphere in the coming 35 years, and how temperatures consequently would rise. His numbers have proven almost dead-on correct. Meanwhile, other powerful evidence poured in over those decades, showing the "greenhouse effect" is real and is happening. And yet resistance to the idea among many in the U.S. appears to have hardened. What's going on? "The desire to disbelieve deepens as the scale of the threat grows," concludes economist-ethicist Clive Hamilton. He and others who track what they call "denialism" find that its nature is changing in America, last redoubt of climate naysayers. It has taken on a more partisan, ideological tone. Polls find a widening Republican-Democratic gap on climate. Republican presidential candidate Rick Perry even accuses climate scientists of lying for money. Global warming looms as a debatable question in yet another U.S. election campaign. From his big-windowed office overlooking the wooded campus of the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory in Palisades, N.Y., Broecker has observed this deepening of the desire to disbelieve. In this July 15, 2011 photo, atop roughly two miles of ice,  technician Marie McLane launches a data-transmitting  weather balloon at Summit Station, a remote research site  operated by the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF),  and situated 10,500 feet above sea level, on top of the  Greenland ice sheet. Climate scientists overwhelmingly  agree that manmade greenhouse gases are warming the  planet, accelerating the melt of Greenland's ice, and yet  resistance to the idea appears to have hardened among  many Americans. Why? "The desire to disbelieve deepens  as the scale of the threat grows," concludes one scholar  who has studied the phenomenon. Analysts now see  climate as another battleground in America's left-right  "culture wars." (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley) 
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