Lec11 Climate III - Global Climate Change III Chapter 3...

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Global Climate Change III Chapter 3: Chemistry in Context
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Homework: Calculate your carbon “footprint” http://www.terrapass.com/ Driving my car: 10,132 lbs CO 2 per year Air travel: 10,433 lbs CO 2 per year Home heating/electricity: 21,048 lbs per year Prof. Johnston’s footprint: 41,613 lbs or 20.8 tons per year Class Average: 27,400 (+/- 17,000) lbs or 13.7 tons per year per student
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What we have learned about global warming: 1. Current levels of CO 2 and other greenhouse gases have increased since pre-industrial times. 2. The larger concentrations of greenhouse gases mean that more energy (heat from absorbed IR radiation) is going into the atmosphere than in pre- industrial times. 3. The magnitude of this energy increase is known. 4. CO 2 is the main contributor to this increased heating. Its concentration continues to increase through human activities (combustion).
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What we still need to consider: 1. How can we directly link human activity to increases in greenhouse concentrations? How can we estimate future increases? 2. How much of a temperature increase does the increase in energy absorbed from greenhouse gases cause? 3. What are the consequences of a temperature increase?
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Global Carbon Cycle
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Calculating the amount of CO 2 emitted from combustion of coal: C (s) + O 2(g) CO 2(g) If we burn 1 ton of coal, how much CO 2 is produced? Some facts and definitions: Mass of proton = mass of neutron = 1 amu = 1.66x10 -24 g Mass of a 12 C atom = 12 amu = (12amu)x(1.66x10 -24 g/amu) = 2.0x10 -23 g Define: 1 mole of 12 C = 12 g (simply replace “amu” by “g”) Then: Number of 12 C atoms per mole = (12g/mole)/(2.0x10 -23 g/atom) = 6x10 23 atoms/mole Avogadro’s Number
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C (s) + O 2(g) CO 2(g) If we burn 1 ton of coal, how much CO 2 is produced? Thought process according to the balanced equation:
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Lec11 Climate III - Global Climate Change III Chapter 3...

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