Lec2 Air Pollution II

Lec2 Air Pollution II - Air Pollution II Where does air...

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Air Pollution II Where does air pollution come from? How can it be reduced? (Ch. 1: Chemistry in Context)
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Problem Set #1 – Chemistry 100 Do the following problems in your text: Chapter 1: 8, 12, 15, 20, 21, 35, 36, 42, 43* Procedure: 1. Bring your answers to class on paper in a form that is ready to turn in. Do not use red color pen/pencil when writing your answers. 2. Prior to turning in the problem set, we will discuss the answers in class. Red pens will be distributed in class for you to write corrections and other notations as you wish. 3. Grading will be based on your initial answers, i.e. material that is not written in red. A total of 25 points will be split among the assigned problems. 4. A star denotes a web exercise. When completing this exercise, you must cite the web pages you used to develop your answer. While you may go to wikipedia to obtain some basic information, you must visit and cite other web pages.
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Clean Air Act, 1970 (Amendments in 1990 and 1997) Criteria pollutants: Regulated by first developing health-based criteria as the basis for setting permissible levels Each State must develop an implementation plan (SIP) to achieve National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) Hazardous Air Pollutants Known to cause cancer and/or other major health effects Regulation based on “Maximum Available Control Technology (MACT)”, i.e. reducing levels as much as is technologically and economically feasible
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Revisions to Criteria Pollutant Standards 1987: PM10 replaces Total Suspended Particulates 1997: PM2.5 standard added; PM10 standard retained 2008: PM standards under final review PM2.5 daily average set to 35 g/m 3 PM10 standard removed PM coarse (2.5-10 m size) set to 70 g/m 3
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New PM2.5 standard: How low is low enough? Health effects scale with exposure. Health studies suggest that each 1 g/m 3 reduction in PM 2.5 will prevent 25,000 premature deaths worldwide. There is no such thing as zero exposure. What is a low enough exposure? (Cost-benefit) Past and future PM 2.5 standards: Current US standard (annual average): 15 g/m 3 World Health Organization recommendation: 10 g/m 3 American Lung Association recommendation: 12 g/m 3 Current EPA “suggestion” for new standard: 14 g/m 3 See: Nature, Vol 444 (16 Nov 2006) pp. 249-250
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This note was uploaded on 10/24/2011 for the course CHEM 100 taught by Professor Vanleer,m during the Spring '08 term at University of Delaware.

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Lec2 Air Pollution II - Air Pollution II Where does air...

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