hw4-2011 - inequalities. (1/3; 1/3; 1/4; 1/12). • H (X, Y...

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Unformatted text preview: inequalities. (1/3; 1/3; 1/4; 1/12). • H (X, Y |Z ) ≥ H ( code. Construct a Huffmann X |Z ), Show that there are two different optimal codes with codeword lengths (1; 2; 3, 3) and (2; 2; 2; 2). Z ) ≥ I (X ; that there exists an optimal code such that some of its codewords are longer than • I ((X, Y ); Conclude Z ), those of the corresponding Shannon-Fano code. • H (X, Y, Z ) − H (X, Y ) ≤ H (X, Z ) − H (X ). Problem 17 A sequence of six symbols are independently drawn according to the distribution of the random ECE 563 ProblemX . The sequence is encoded symbol-by-symbol using an optimal (Huffmann) code. The resulted an arbitrary random variable taking its values from the set variable 23 (Card shuffling) Let X be IUC, Fall 2011 U {binary . string is 10110000101. We permutationthe the numbers 1, 2,has. ,five i.e., T (1), T (2)we. .only know a 1, 2, . . , 52}. Let T be a random know that of source alphabet . . 52, elements, but , . , T (52) is HW #4 random re-ordering ofis one of {1, 2, . . .distributions {0, 4; 0, 3; 0T2; 0,independent of{0, 3;Show 0, 2; 0, 2; 0, 05}. that the distribution the set the two , 52}. We assume that , is 05; 0, 05} and X . 0, 25; that Determine the distribution of X . Issued: October 4th, 2011 H (T (X )) ≥ 11th, Due: October H (X ). 2011 Problem 18 We are asked to determine an object by asking yes-no questions. The object is drawn randomly − Problem 24 set according 1 , X2 , . . . bedistribution. Playing optimally, we need 38.5 questions on the average6 . from a finite Let X = Xto a certain a binary memoryless stationary source with P{X1 = 1} = 10 Determine aobject. At least how many elements does theexpected codeword length is smaller than 1/10. Problemthe variable-length code of X whose per letter finite set have? to find 1: Problem 25 (Run length coding) Let Huffmann be binary random variables. Let R = (R1 ,binary.) Problem 19 (Shortest codeword of X1 , . . . , Xn codes) Suppose that we have an optimal R2 , . . denote coderun lengths of the symbols. in X,1 , . . . , Xn . > p >is,. for example, thethat lengths of the sequence prefix the for the distribution (p1 , . . , pn ) where p1 That . . , pn > 0. Show run 2 1110010001111 is R = (3, 2, 1, 3, 4). Determine the relation between H (X1 , . . . , Xn ), H (R) and H (R, Xn )? • If p1 > 2/5 then the corresponding codeword has length 1. Problem 26 (Entropy of a Markov chain) Let X = X1 , X2 , . . . be a binary stationary Markov chain Problem p < 1/3 then the corresponding codeword has length at least 2. • If 2: with state1transition probabilities Problem 20 (Basketball play-offs) The play-offs of NBA are played between team A and team B in1a+ p 1−p P{X2 = 0|X1 = 0} = p, P{X2 = 1|X1 = 0} = 1−p, P{X2 = 0|X1 = 1} = , P{X2 = 1|X1 = 1} = . 2 seven-game series that terminates as soon as one of the teams wins four games. Let the random variable X 2 represent P{X1 = 0} What is the games (possible values Determinethe outcome .of the series of entropy of the source?of X are AAAA or BABABAB or AAABBBB ). Let Y denote the number of games played. Assuming that the two teams are equally strong, determine the Problem H (X ), H (Y ), H (Y |X ) and H (X |Y ). values of 27 (The second law of thermodynamics) Let X = X1 , X2 , . . . be a stationary Markov chain. Show that H (Xn |X1 ) is monotone increasing (in spite of the fact that H (Xn ) does not change with n by stationarity). Problem 3: Textbook, page 51, 2.36 - Symmetric Relative Entropy Problem 28 (Properties of the binary entropy function) Define the function h(x) = −x log x − Problem 4: Texbook, page 48, 2.21 - Markov’s inequality for probabilities (1 − x) log(1 − x), for x ∈ (0, 1), and h(0) = h(1) = 0. Show that h satisfies the following properties: Problem 5: Texbook, page 92, 4.10 - Pairwise independence • symmetric around 1/2; • continuous in every point of [0, 1]; 4 • strictly monotone increasing in [0, 1/2]; • strictly concave. 5 ...
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This note was uploaded on 10/24/2011 for the course ELECTRICAL ECE 571 taught by Professor Kelly during the Spring '11 term at University of Illinois, Urbana Champaign.

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