case study on gsk in developing countries.

case study on gsk in developing countries. - Case Study on:...

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Unformatted text preview: Case Study on: GlaxoSmithKline Case OBJECTIVE: GSK TO SUPPLY ANTIRETROVIRALS AND ANTI-MALARIALS AT SUSTAINABLE PREFERENTIAL PRICES FOR ELIGIBLE CUSTOMERS IN THE LEAST DEVELOPED COUNTRIES AND ALL SUB-SAHARAN AFRICAN COUNTRIES. Eligible customers include the public sector, not-for-profit NGOs, aid agencies, UN agencies and international purchase funds such as the Global Fund to fight AIDS, TB and Malaria. Additionally, because of the gravity of the situation in sub-Saharan Africa, employers there who offer HIV/AIDS care and treatment directly to their staff through workplace clinics are also eligible. MADE BY: JIGAR.R.RAJPURA X-01824544 Sustainable Preferential Pricing Ar r angements GlaxoSmithKline has offered preferential pricing for our HIV/AIDS medicines since 1997. They placed a high priority on their prices being sustainable. This means setting prices at levels that meet their costs, thereby ensuring they can sustain supply of these high-quality products for as long as they are needed. The Promise In Facing the Challenge it is promised to: extend preferential pricing to more products, countries and customers; supply antiretrovirals and anti-malarials at preferential prices to public sector customers and not-for-profit organisations in 63 countries all the Least Developed Countries of the world and all of sub-Saharan Africa; supply ARV therapy at preferential prices to employers in sub-Saharan Africa who provide HIV/AIDS care and treatment directly to their staff through their own workplace clinics; make thier ARVs and anti-malarials available at preferential prices to international purchase funds; set up pilot projects with non-governmental organisations (NGOs) in five African countries to evaluate the impact ofoffering a more extensive range of medicines at preferential prices; work on a case-by-case basis with middle income developing countries through the AAI and unilaterally to make treatment more affordable; continue established discounting arrangements for vaccine supply work with genuine partners on other ways of making medicine more affordable for developing countries. Progress They have concluded some 95 arrangements covering 31 countries for the supply of preferentially priced ARVs. Chart A outlines these partners by type and progress since the start of 2001. Nineteen of the supply agreements have been through the Accelerating Access Initiative (AAI). AAI is the partnership, established in 2000, between UN agencies and six pharmaceutical companies. Among the AAI partner countries are middle income developing countries that have shown strong political will to tackle HIV/AIDS. These include Honduras, Trinidad and Tobago, Romania, and Chile. The AAI has had an important catalytic effect. A further 59 countries have expressed interest in joining. As a result of these initiatives, a tenfold increase in shipments of preferentially priced Combivir to the developing world in the first half of 2002 compared to the first half...
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case study on gsk in developing countries. - Case Study on:...

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