CH1 - The prisoners dilemma C h a p te r O n e Using the...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter One Using the prisoner’s dilemma to think about international relations The prisoner’s dilemma • Two people are caught with drugs. If both remain silent, both go free; if only one remains silent, he gets 25 years in prison; if both squeal, both get 10 years in jail. • It’s rational to squeal, even though it eliminates the prisoners’ best option. • Why? Because one cannot trust the other. Realism and the dilemma • For realists, the prisoner’s dilemma defines life in the international system. • Outcomes are zero-sum, the world is anarchic, and self-help is necessary. • States are trapped in a security dilemma, so they pursue power for self-protection. • Power, for realists, is equated with material capabilities, like economic capacity, military strength, and population. • States are often the actors that realists focus on most, because states command the greatest power. • To maintain power, states must often
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 10/25/2011 for the course HUMA 002 taught by Professor Yu during the Spring '11 term at Alcorn State.

Page1 / 3

CH1 - The prisoners dilemma C h a p te r O n e Using the...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online