social evolution - SocialEvolution:Anthropology204...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Social Evolution:  Anthropology 204 Fall 2011   Amy S. Jacobson Ph.D. Tuesday/Thursday 1:40-3:00 Lucy Stone Hall Auditorium, Livingston Campus Office Hours:  Tuesday 11:00 – 1:00 Office Location: Room 208E Biological Sciences Bldg.  Douglass Contact Info:  [email protected] Course Description:   The goal of this course is to provide a working knowledge of basic  concepts in evolutionary theory and the examination of the biological  basis of human behavior from an evolutionary perspective. Students  should come away from this course with new knowledge and  broadened perspectives about the world, how it works and their role  in it. Required Texts:   The required text for this course is a book by John Cartwright that  provides an overview of key theoretical principles of Human  Sociobiology and Evolutionary Psychology.  The book is available for  purchase at the Rutgers Co-Op.      Cartwright, J. (2008) Evolution and Human Behavior 2     nd     Ed.       MIT  Press.   During the course of the semester, additional reading may be  assigned.  These will be made available as PDF’s in the “Resources”  section of the Sakai website for this course. Course Requirements:
Image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Your final Grade will be determined as follows: Midterm Exam 40% Final Exam 45% Short Essay  10% Participation     5% Exams:   The midterm and final exams will be comprised of a mixture of  objective questions (Multiple Choice, Matching, etc.).  Review sheets  will be handed out one week before the exam and if time permits, we  will review at the end of the class period preceding the exam.  The  midterm will cover the material discussed in class as well as the  reading assignments assigned up until that point.  Review sessions will  be held on Sakai Chat.      While the final exam will not be cumulative in general, the nature  of the material presented in this class is structured so that there is a  continuous building of knowledge and information learned in the first  half of the course that is essential to the interpretation and  understanding of the material presented in the second half.  So, while  you may not be tested on specific details from information presented  during the first half of the semester, it will be expected that you would  have retained basic information regarding the principles of  evolutionary theory and be able to apply them.
Image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern