tech theatre 2

tech theatre 2 - During technical rehearsals one problem...

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Rebecca Densen Technical Theatre Project 2 The technical brief I read was Hand-held Dancing Fireflies , by Andrew V. Wallace, volume 28.3 number 1441 from April 2010. The Yale Repertory Theatre’s challenge was to create the appearance of dancing fireflies when the lights go off, for the production of The Servant of Two Masters. They wanted it to appear as if more fireflies continually joined. To create this effect they had each of the cast members carry a wandlike device with a small lamp on each of its two stems, which were joined together by a handle they built in the shop. They created the stems with brass rods covered in black shrink-wrap, and attached a Mini-Mag krypton light bulb on each end. They mounted the stems and lamps on the handles they made from a PVC tube. They made the entire thing operate on triple A batteries that would be located in the handle.
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Unformatted text preview: During technical rehearsals one problem the team came across was that the light was too bright. Their solution to this was to remove one of the batteries from each handle, then, they bridged the connections with a small jumper wire. They believed this would be simpler than adding resistors. This technical element can be used in various other circumstances in the theatre. One example would be in an Arena Theatre, the lights cannot be too bright or they will bother many of the audience members. In this type of theatre it is especially important to be careful with light decisions because of the format of the space. This technique could be adjusted and applied to any light props being used or even the technical lights for the show, in order to prevent blocking anyones vision or bother anyones eyes while they watch a performance in an Arena space....
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This note was uploaded on 10/25/2011 for the course TH 106 taught by Professor Tomburke during the Spring '11 term at SUNY Buffalo.

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