lecture18_312_GovernmentReg2_SP11_overheads

lecture18_312_GovernmentReg2_SP11_overheads - Lecture #18...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–6. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Lecture #18 April 4, 2009 Regulation, State and National
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Sorry, I goofed. Output per acre in the late 19 th century stayed constant. Evidence:
Background image of page 2
National Government Regulation begins with state regulation: Munn vs. Illinois 1877 followed by: Wabash vs. Illinois 1886 Interstate Commerce Act, 1887 Sherman Anti-Trust Act, 1890
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
The Granger laws The grange was a movement that spread in the 1870s. The National Grange of the Patrons of Husbandry was a social group organized around community issues of farmers. By 1875, the Grange had over 850,000 members. The Grange and Granger movement was followed by others, the Greenback and Alliance movements for example, which culminated in the Populist movement which became and organized political party in the 1890s. The Grange was successful in inducing states to begin regulating railroad and grain elevator rates. Grain elevators were important, because farmers would bring their grain to the elevator. The elevator would store the grain high up, and then when the train pulled into the station, the train cars could quickly be loaded using gravity. Grain elevators, like railroads, tended to possess local monopolies.
Background image of page 4
The “Granger cases” were five court cases challenging state laws regulating the prices that railroads and grain elevators charged. Four of the five cases regulated railroad rates, but the fifth case Munn v. Illinois , concerned a grain elevator. The Supreme Court heard all five cases together, and issued its ruling that applied to all five cases together. In the majority opinion, Chief Justice Waite wrote that the
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 6
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 15

lecture18_312_GovernmentReg2_SP11_overheads - Lecture #18...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 6. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online