chronicdispost

chronicdispost - Other Chronic Diseases and Conditions...

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Other Chronic Diseases and Conditions
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Chronic Diseases: What Are They, and Why Are They Important? Diseases that persist for a long time Rarely cured completely Biggest cause of death and disability around the world.
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Chronic diseases are common, and they also affect women more than men. Chronic diseases are responsible for 70% of deaths in the U.S. (men and women). Greater rates of arthritis, immune diseases, Alzheimer’s disease for women Lupus afflicts women 9X more often than men Hypothyroidism is 50X more common in women Women are also more likely to be caretakers for other people with chronic diseases.
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Racial/Ethnic and Socioeconomic Dimensions White and Asian women have osteoporosis more often than African American women African American women are more likely than white women to die following a hip fracture American Indians and Alaskan Natives have the highest prevalence rates of diabetes Blacks and whites have somewhat equal rates of arthritis, but blacks have a higher rate of activity limitations due to arthritis and a higher prevalence of severe pain
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Estimated Annual Costs Conditions Costs Arthritis $128 billion Diabetes $132 billion Alzheimer’s disease $100 billion Cardiovascular disease $300 billion Bone fractures $12–18 billion Economic Dimensions
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Nonmodifiable Risk Factors for Osteoporosis © Ron Chapple/Thinkstock/PictureQuest Osteoporosis Being female Increased age/postmenopausal Small frame and thin-boned White or Asian Family history of osteoporosis or fractures
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Modifiable Risk Factors for Osteoporosis Diet low in calcium and vitamin D Sedentary lifestyle Cigarette smoking Estrogen deficiency Low weight and body mass index Certain medications Glucocorticoids, anticonvulsants Amenorrhea Anorexia nervosa or bulimia
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Screening and Diagnosis for Osteoporosis Women who should be tested: All postmenopausal women younger than age 65 who have one or more additional risk factors for osteoporosis besides menopause All women age 65 and older Postmenopausal women with fractures
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chronicdispost - Other Chronic Diseases and Conditions...

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