Chapter 2 Study Guide

Chapter 2 Study Guide - Chapter 2: Representations of Earth...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 2: Representations of Earth If we want to view the entire world, a globe provides the most accurate representation of our planet. Great Circle: - Imaginary circles drawn in any directions whose plane passes through the center of the Earth. - Divides the Earth into equal halves, hemispheres - Circle of Illumination : divides the earth into light and dark halves (day and night hemisphere) - Any trace along any great circle marks the shortest travel routes between locations on Earth’s surface – good for navigation Small Circle: planes do not pass through the Earth’s center Coordinate System: a precise system of grid lines used to describe location The North and South Poles mark the opposite positions of Earth’s rotational axis around which Earth turns in 24 hours Latitude: - Equator: the halfway point between the North and South Poles. The equator forms a great circle that divides the planet into the Northern and Southern Hemisphere (0 degrees latitude) - The angular distance in degrees either north or south of the Equator - The equator is the reference line for measuring latitude in degrees North or degrees South (latitude lines run from side to side) - The North and South Poles are 90 degrees latitude north and south respectively - 1 degree latitude = 111 kilometers - Degrees are divided into minutes and seconds Longitude: - To find a location east or west, we use longitude lines, which run from pole to pole (longitude lines run up and down), each one forming half a great circle - Prime Meridian: 0 degrees longitude, east-west reference line for Longitude. Passes through Greenwich, England and was established by an international agreement - The angular distance in degrees either east or west of the Prime Meridian - Measured in degrees, minutes, and seconds - Our longitude increases as we go farther east or west from 0 degrees at the prime meridian Parallels: latitude lines that are parallel to the equator
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This document was uploaded on 10/27/2011 for the course GEO 121 at Miami University.

Page1 / 4

Chapter 2 Study Guide - Chapter 2: Representations of Earth...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online