EXAM 2 READING

EXAM 2 READING - EXAM 2 READING Page 71-83 Electromagnetic...

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EXAM 2 READING Page 71-83 Electromagnetic Energy : form of energy that is emitted by the sun - Travels at the speed of light in a spectrum of varying wavelengths - Figure 3. 9 Electromagnetic Spectrum - Shorter wavelengths than visible light – cannot be seen but can affect other tissues of the human body Gamma Rays X-rays Ultraviolet radiation - Longer wavelengths than visible light Near Infrared (shorter wavelengths of infrared) Far Infrared/ Thermal Infrared – heat - 1% of solar radiation Microwave Television Radio Wavelengths Shortwave Radiation: gamma rays, X-rays, ultraviolet rays, and near infrared Longwave Radiation: thermal infrared and longer Movements of Earth Rotation: the spin of the Earth on its axis at a uniform rate making one full turn in 24 hours - Earth turns in an eastward direction - The velocity of rotation at the Earth’s surface varies with the distance of a given place from the equator Angular velocity – 15 degrees per hour for all locations on Earth Linear velocity – depends on the distance (NOT the angle) covered during the 24 hours Linear velocity at the poles is 0 degrees Greatest linear velocity is at the equator - Circle of Illumination: the great circle that separates day from night Rotation accounts for our days and nights Sun Angle, Duration, and Insolation Insolation: solar radiation received by the Earth system, main source of Earth’s energy - Fluctuations in insolation cause seasonal variations in temperature - 2 Phenomena that directly effect the intensity of solar radiation received the duration of daylight the angle of the sun’s rays - Amount of insolation available is dependant on the intensity and the duration of radiation - Areas that will receive more insolation where the sun shines directly and or where the suns shines longer
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- Only one line of LATITUDE on Earth’s rotating surface can receive radiation at right angles wile the rest receive varying oblique angles Seasons - The angle at which the sun’s rays strike Earth’s surface determines the amount of solar energy received per unit of surface area. When solar radiation strikes the surface of the Tropic of Cancer perpendicularly the Northern Hemisphere has summer conditions. In the Southern hemisphere, the suns rays are more oblique and spread over larger areas thus receiving less energy per unit of area giving them winter - Solstice: solar radiation strikes the surface of the Tropic of Cancer perpendicularly - Equinox: day and night are of equal locations for all locations on Earth and conditions are identical for both hemispheres Lines on Earth Delimiting Solar Energy - Arctic Circle: an imaginary line drawn around Earth 23½ degrees from the North pole All points on or north of the Arctic Circle will experience NO darkness on the June solstice and all points south of the Arctic Circle will have some darkness on that day - Antarctic Circle: imaginary line drawn around Earth 23½ degreees north
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EXAM 2 READING - EXAM 2 READING Page 71-83 Electromagnetic...

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