Plath’s heroine may be

Plath’s heroine may be - Plaths heroine may be...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Plath’s heroine may be “cured” at the end of The Bell Jar , but she is not more healthy. The cure is just another form of the illness. Esther is cured because she is smoothed into society. Which is illness in and of itself. I. A Bell Jar is used to protect and display delicate objects a. The bell jar is her mental illness…psychiatric ward b. It is a particularly striking image, which conveys both the isolation and desolation of being imprisoned in a 'world of one's own', and the sense of stifling helplessness evoked by being unable to escape from that world. c. Society put her in this bell jar. The Cold War Maternalism, expectations, limits isolates Esther and created this depression. d. Healthy and normal are equivocated by society perhaps the psychiatric ward did make her more normal because she ends up with a baby and Buddy goes, “Who are you going to marry now?” (normal thing to do for a girl her age) d.i. Repression e. Cold War Maternalism – represents the conflict between Plath and normal
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This document was uploaded on 10/27/2011 for the course ENG 355 at Miami University.

Page1 / 2

Plath’s heroine may be - Plaths heroine may be...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online