Chao T'ai - Emily Leung Chinese 155 Fall 2009 Essay #2 Chao...

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Unformatted text preview: Emily Leung Chinese 155 Fall 2009 Essay #2 Chao Tai and Buddhism The tale, Chao Tai and His Experiences in Hell, in the Classical Chinese Tales of the Supernatural and the Fantastic: Selections from the Third to the Tenth Century edited by Karl S. Y. Kao is a tale that incorporates indigenous Chinese concepts and ideas that entered China with Buddhism. Chao Tai and His Experiences in Hell is a tale of a native who was the grandson of the governor of the capital of Ching-ho (Kao 166). He declines an offer to be in a government position, and around the age of thirty-five, he passes away. However, Chao Tai does not die, his heart remained warm, and body flexible shortly after, he came back to life (Kao 167). After being reborn, Chao Tai explains to the people his experiences in Hell. During his experiences in Hell, he was appointed as an Inspector of Waterworks. Because Chao Tai was appointed the Inspector of Waterworks, it allowed him to witness all sorts of things in Hell. In this description lie the indigenous Chinese concepts and the ideas that entered China with Buddhism. Popular Buddhism, Buddhism combined with Chinese indigenous concepts, is incorporated into this tale of Chao Tai through the terms of Karma, Samsara, and Retribution/Recompense. On the other hand, the ideas that entered China with Buddhism mainly focuses on the concept of salvation. Karma is demonstrated throughout Chao Tais experience in Hell because it is the ethical totality of all acts. During his inspection, Chao Tai witnessed three people leaving hell and entering The Great Mansion of the Shining Forth of the Light. These people were released from the gates of hell because their families had hung pennants and burned incense in stupas and monasteries for their benefit to save them from their sins (Kao 168). Also when leaving and monasteries for their benefit to save them from their sins (Kao 168)....
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Chao T'ai - Emily Leung Chinese 155 Fall 2009 Essay #2 Chao...

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