Lecture0913final

Lecture0913final - Non-invasive methods to detect function,...

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Non-invasive methods to detect function, anatomy of brain Computerized tomography (CT) MRI fMRI PET Electroencephalography (EEG) SQUID magneto-encephalography (MEG)
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Positron-emission Tomography (PET) scans Incorporate unstable, positron emitting atoms (e.g. 15 O, 11 C) into molecules such as glucose or oxygen (“label” these atoms). Inject labeled oxygen, glucose into bloodstream > brain. Detect emitted positrons with scanning detectors. Reconstruct location and density of labeled O 2 , glucose. Active areas of brain will show increased O 2 , glucose levels Slow – takes seconds for uptake to follow neuronal activity. Poor resolution (a few mm), needs on-site cyclotron to produce isotopes (short half life).
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                                                    Activity in right fusiform cortex during a face-matching exercise Revealed by a PET scan
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Electro-encephalography (EEG) Arrays of electrodes placed onto patient’s scalp. Detect minute electrical potential waves flowing
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This document was uploaded on 10/27/2011 for the course BSCI 453 at Maryland.

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Lecture0913final - Non-invasive methods to detect function,...

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