Environ_Microb_Geomicrobiol_N_Yee

Environ_Microb_Geomicrobiol_N_Yee - Introduction...

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troduction Geomicrobiology Introduction Geomicrobiology 1. Microbial Life in Geologic Environments acteria that reak cks apart 2. Bacteria that break rocks apart . acteria that ake cks 3. Bacteria that make rocks 4. Bacteria that eat rocks 5. Bacteria that breath rocks
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Fe(II) oxidizing bacteria Gallionella Sea Floor Iron Oxides at Axial Volcano, Juan da Fuca Ridge Leptothrix , PV-1 Courtesy of Kennedy et al. 2003
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• Terrestrial Hot Springs – Deeply branching S- oxidizing bacteria Aquificales q – Very small Archaea • 400 nm in diameter hotosynthetic – Photosynthetic cyanobacteria Life on Enceladus?
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Microbes in Hot Springs 1 cm 00 10 m 300 m
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Cold Springs Iron-oxidizing bacteria produce Fe 3+ In circumneutral pH water, Fe 3+ rapidly hydrolyzes and precipitates as ferrihydrite TEM image of Leptothrix ochracea cells from cold-water seep Denmark
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Deep subsurface biosphere: Life detected at 6 km deep Anaerobes and novel energy sources •H 2 from radiolysis and geothermal sources Marine sediments: sulfate and ydrocarbon hydrocarbon Oceanic basalts acterial e structures – Bacterial-like structures – Enriched in bioessential elements arbon isotopes – Carbon isotopes – Bacterial and Archaeal DNA
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Martian Meteorite ALH84001 Carbonate Globules – Low Temperature Formation – Geologically ancient gy Magnetite – Single domain hemically pure Chemically pure Bacteria-like structures – Size: 20 to 100 nm olycyclic aromatic Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons – Cell decay products?
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acteria that break rocks apart Bacteria that break rocks apart
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Cyanobacteria living inside granite
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Biofilms are complex microbial communities Extracellular polysaccharide py matrix ells grow on mineral surfaces Cells grow on mineral surfaces
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Biofilms on rocks: to survive microbes need to extract utrients from the solid nutrients from the solid minerals icrobes cannot readily
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This note was uploaded on 10/25/2011 for the course ENVSCI 411 taught by Professor Young during the Spring '11 term at Rutgers.

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Environ_Microb_Geomicrobiol_N_Yee - Introduction...

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