lect_10 - Conservation of Energy For a system in...

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Unformatted text preview: Conservation of Energy For a system in thermodynamic equilibrium, the first law of thermodynamics states that the change in internal energy of the system is equal to the difference between the heat added to the system and the work done by the system. The first law of thermodynamics applies to a moving fluid parcel. The rate of change of total thermodynamic energy is equal to the rate of diabatic heating plus the rate at which work is done on the parcel by external forces. External Forces Work can be done on the fluid parcel by both surface forces and body forces. Surface force: pressure gradient. Body forces: gravity and Coriolis. The Coriolis force does no work because it is always perpendicular to motion of the fluid parcel. Force must be along the direction of motion for work to be done. Thermodynamic Energy Equation Q dt d p dt dT c v = + The derivation in section 2.6 of Holton yields a basic form of the thermodynamic energy equation: c v is the specific heat at constant volume....
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lect_10 - Conservation of Energy For a system in...

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