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11MythOct10 - Greek and Roman Myth Oct 10 2011 1 Outline...

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Greek and Roman Myth Oct. 10, 2011 1
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Outline What is a hero? Pelops Pindar vs. other versions Cult of Pelops at Olympia Perseus cf. Bellerophon Meleager Proppian theories of formulaic folktale functions 2
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How to become a hero Be a Homeric warrior Be the subject of other myths Have some relationship (amorous, parental, or antagonistic) with a god Found a city Have powerful descendents Die an extraordinary death Have an impressive tomb
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How to become a hero Be a Homeric warrior Be the subject of other myths Have some relationship (amorous, parental, or antagonistic) with a god Found a city Have powerful descendents Die an extraordinary death Have an impressive tomb
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Hero Cults Myths and cult practices varied Animal sacrifice, burning, bloodletting Theoxenia = banquet with gods Votive offerings Games Libation Cults often centered on tombs Worship of Bronze age tombs Development of ancestor cult Local deities most important
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The last hero: Pausanias 6.9.6-8 At the festival previous to this it is said that Cleomedes of Astypalaea killed Iccus of Epidaurus during a boxing-match. On being convicted by the umpires of foul play and being deprived of the prize he became mad through grief and returned to Astypalaea. Attacking a school there of about sixty children he pulled down the pillar which held up the roof. This fell upon the children, and Cleomedes, pelted with stones by the citizens, took refuge in the sanctuary of Athena.
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The end of Cleomedes?
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