lab 1

lab 1 - Alan Hwang 103-777-115 Life Science 2 Sec 2D TA...

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Alan Hwang 103-777-115 Life Science 2 – Sec 2D TA Anna Konstorum January 6, 2010 Does an Incident of Loss of Consciousness Affect Short Term Memory? Introduction: Every person has a different ability to memorize things. A wide range of factors may be responsible for how accurately and how quickly an individual can recall something. The Memory Interference Test (MIT) is a study currently being conducted at UCLA that aims to seek out the correlation between certain factors and an individual’s short-term auditory and visual memorization ability. One of the correlations that I was particularly interested in finding out was to see whether a history of loss of consciousness affected memorization. Recently, there has been much controversy in professional sports leagues such as the National Hockey League and National Football League over concussions and the players’ health because many of these players who play these concussion-prone sports have suffered from mental illnesses as they age on. I was wondering if subjects showing a history of loss of consciousness, which is one of the many side effects of concussions, would have worse results in the MIT test compared to the subjects who have never lost consciousness before. Loss of consciousness is not a normal physical occurrence, and can be caused by blunt force trauma to the head, a lack of oxygen to the brain, and the overconsumption of drugs or alcohol. These occurrences are also related to brain
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lab 1 - Alan Hwang 103-777-115 Life Science 2 Sec 2D TA...

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