Anthro33Lecture3.ppt (1)

Anthro33Lecture3.ppt (1) - Ways of Making Sense I(Week 2...

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Ways of Making Sense I (Week 2, Monday, October 3) M. Morgan and African American English cont’d. Indexicality Capps and Ochs - Narrative structure as theory Schegloff - Achieving the “routine” and constructing the “normal” Transcripts as theories
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African American Speech community members’ diverse beliefs about African American English ( AAE ): • it has an “expressive” African character • symbol of resistance to slavery and oppression, or • is an indicator of a slave “mentality” or consciousness • Dynamic and always changing • Verbal Dexterity is critical
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Morgan: AAE is a “Counterlanguage” • Complex sign of both resistance and oppression • Expressive of African character • AAE functions to signal community membership and solidarity across class lines.
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Ideologies about AE in the African American Community: • It is the language of education, and therefore status • It can signal the rejection of membership in the African American community • Symbolic of historical oppression
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Morgan has found that… Middle class African Americans do not associate being middle class with an absence of African American culture.
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“AAE reflects language as a symbol of ‘actual social life… a multitude of concrete worlds …of bounded verbal-ideological and social belief systems’ (Bakhtin 1981: 288).” AAE suggests the multi-situated nature of African-American life. Morgan argues that …
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“Sociolinguists have constituted speech community membership and style in ways that reinscribe the dominant society’s interpretation of AAE as a sign of poverty and oppression” (Morgan, p. 83).
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Mikhail Bakhtin heteroglossia “At any given moment of its evolution, language is stratified not only into linguistic dialects in the strict sense of the word… but also - and for us this is the essential point - into languages that are socio-ideological : languages of social groups, “professional” and “generic” languages, languages of generations and so forth.” Linguistic homogeneity is an ideological construction.
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