REVIEW_pics_for_EXAM_4_on_CHs_35_37_38

REVIEW_pics_for_EXAM_4_on_CHs_35_37_38 - THESE ARE SOME OF...

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THESE ARE SOME OF THE MORE IMPORTANT PICTURES TAKEN FROM THE NOTES COVERING CH 35, CH 37, AND CH 38 Use the web site below for review questions: http://wps.prenhall.com/esm_audesirk_bloe_7/1,8753,1139971,.html
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CH 35 PICS
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Skeletal muscle Cardiac muscle Smooth muscle muscle fiber nuclei muscle fiber nuclei muscle fiber nucleus connections with gap junctions link adjacent cells Where would you find examples of each of these three types of muscles? How do they differ from each other?
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Skeletal Muscle Cell Structure and Function are Closely Linked Skeletal muscle attaches to the skeleton by tendons : Tough cords of collagen fibers tendon Skeletal muscle Muscle fiber Myofibril connective tissue nerve and blood vessels How is muscle tissue arranged? What are the individual parts?
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(a) Cross section of fiber T tubules sarcoplasmic reticulum myofibril muscle fiber membrane How is muscle tissue arranged? What are the individual parts?
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(b) Myofibril and sarcomere sarcomere myofibril Z lines thin filament thick filament How is muscle tissue arranged? What are the individual parts?
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(c) Thick and thin filaments thin filament thick filament (myosin) myosin heads troponin actin tropomyosin (accessory proteins) How is muscle tissue arranged? What are the individual parts?
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(a) thin filament thick filament binding sites myosin head ATP Understand the relationship between thick and thin filaments
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Contracted muscle Relaxed muscle sarcomere Be able to differentiate between relaxed and contracted muscles
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thick and thin filaments infolding of muscle fiber membrane motor neuron synaptic terminals action potential motor neuron axon muscle fiber (a) synaptic vesicles Muscles are also controlled by the nervous system through the use of motor neurons, synaptic vesicles, and neurotransmitters
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(a) Hydrostatic skeletons circular muscle longitudinal muscle fluid-filled cavity longitudinal muscles contracted circular muscles contracted Hydrostatic skeletons
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Exoskeleton
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skull Axial skeleton (blue) Appendicular skeleton (beige) mandible sternum rib clavicle scapula humerus vertebral column Endoskeleton. Be able to label these parts and know difference between the axial and appendicular skeletons
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coccyx (tail bone) pelvis ulna radius carpals metacarpals phalanges femur patella tibia fibula tarsals metatarsals phalanges Axial skeleton (blue) Appendicular skeleton (beige) Endoskeleton. Be able to label these parts and know difference between the axial and appendicular skeletons
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Ligaments Collagen bands that connect bone to bone at joints Ligaments connect bone to bone
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chondrocytes collagen matrix Different components of cartilage. Where would you find cartilage in your body?
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What is cartilage and what is bone in this picture?
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(a) cartilage (b) compact bone spongy bone (contains marrow) osteon osteocytes (within spaces) capillary central canal What is the difference between spongy and compact bone?
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(to thigh muscle) kneecap (bone) femur ligament (to kneecap) tibia Biceps femoris bends leg. cartilage
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This document was uploaded on 10/26/2011 for the course BIOL 1002 at LSU.

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REVIEW_pics_for_EXAM_4_on_CHs_35_37_38 - THESE ARE SOME OF...

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