Chapter 4 part 2

Chapter 4 part 2 - In Class Quiz 4 Board Quiz(same as A to...

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In Class Quiz 4 Board Quiz (same as A to N) 1.Find the number of moles of 6.9 g of Hg 2 (NO 3 ) 2 . (mercury(I)nitrate). 2. How many gallons are there in 42 m 3 ? Given 1gallon=3.7854 L. 3. Complete and balance the following equation (remember it is a double displacement reaction). Is anything insoluble? CaCl 2 + Hg 2 (NO 3 ) 2 Calcium chloride + mercury (I) nitrate 4. An aqueous solution containing Ca 2+ Cl - , CO 3 2- and NO 3 - is allowed to evaporate. Which compound will precipitate? Name the compound or write the formula. Calcium ion, chloride ion, carbonate ion, nitrate ion first?
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Chapter 4 – Reactions in Aqueous Solutions Lecture 8 (CHEM 1010) Agenda: Inclass Quiz Acid, Base and Neutralization Reactions The Activity Series of Elements Oxidation –Reduction Reactions Identifying Redox Reactions Balancing Redox Reactions The Oxidation number method The Half-Reaction Method
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Acids Have a . Vinegar owes its taste to acetic acid. Citrus fruits contain citric acid. Cause color changes in plant dyes. React with certain metals to produce hydrogen gas. React with carbonates and bicarbonates to produce carbon dioxide gas. Aqueous acid solutions conduct electricity. 2HCl( aq ) + Mg( s ) MgCl 2 ( aq ) + H 2 ( g ) 2HCl( aq ) + CaCO 3 ( s ) CaCl 2 ( aq ) + CO 2 ( g ) + H 2 O( l )
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Have a . Feel slippery. Many soaps contain bases. Cause color changes in plant dyes. Aqueous base solutions conduct electricity. Bases
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Arrhenius acid is a substance that produces H + (H 3 O + ) in water. Arrhenius base is a substance that produces OH - in water. Arrhenius acids and bases
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Hydronium ion , hydrated proton, H 3 O + Hydronium ion
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acids and bases are electrolytes acids and bases are electrolytes. Acids and Base Strength How well does an acid or base completely dissociate into its ions?
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protic acids HCl H + + Cl - HNO 3 H + + NO 3 - CH 3 COOH H + + CH 3 COO - Strong electrolyte, strong acid Strong electrolyte, strong acid Weak electrolyte, weak acid protic acids H 2 SO 4 H + + HSO 4 - HSO 4 - H + + SO 4 2- Strong electrolyte, strong acid Weak electrolyte, weak acid protic acids H 3 PO 4 H + + H 2 PO 4 - H 2 PO 4 - H + + HPO 4 2- HPO 4 2- H + + PO 4 3- Weak electrolyte, weak acid Weak electrolyte, weak acid Weak electrolyte, weak acid Acids with multiple acidic protons
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Neutralization Reactions acid + base salt + water H Cl ( aq ) + Na OH ( aq ) Na Cl ( aq ) + H OH H + + Cl - + Na + + OH - Na + + Cl - + H 2 O H + + OH - H 2 O These acid-base neutralization reactions are double- replacement reactions just like the precipitation reactions: M A + H OH H A + M OH
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Write the chemical formulas of the products (use proper ionic rules for the salt). 1.
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This note was uploaded on 10/25/2011 for the course CHEM 1010 taught by Professor Olga during the Spring '11 term at UOIT.

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Chapter 4 part 2 - In Class Quiz 4 Board Quiz(same as A to...

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