Class 9 - Wednesday September 28th n Midterm#1 Monday Sept...

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Unformatted text preview: Wednesday, September 28th n Midterm #1: Monday, Sept. 26th to Thursday, Sept. 29th n Wednesday ($5 late fee) n Thursday ($7 late fee) Must have test in hand by 11 am n Exam in Testing Center. Be sure to go with enough time before Testing Center closes. n Note: It is your responsibility to find out when the testing center closes, and how long lines are running, so that you can avoid getting cut short on the time you need to finish your exam. • The Review Room will be closed during test week • Film #1: A More Perfect Union n Monday, October 3rd at 5:00 pm & Tuesday, October 4th at 7:30 p.m. in B037 JFSB • Draft of Essay #1 due Wednesday, October 12th, See handout and online. • The Confederation Era—Moving Toward a New Government n The need for a new government. n Two key questions. n State governments and their problems. n The Confederation and its problems. n Two reinforcing efforts to secure liberty: n The Massachusetts model n Movement toward a national convention. Need for new government n The Declaration of Independence eliminated existing government: “We therefore…declare that these United Colonies are, and of Right ought to be, Free and Independent States.” n In 1776, the Continental Congress directed the people to form two types of governments n States advised to create new governments. n Committee to draft Articles of Confederation. Challenges of Governance They’re everywhere: home, class, BYU apartment, work, community, nation, world Two Key Questions n How can we form a government by the people that preserves liberty? n The “republican problem”. n How should the states and national government relate to each other? Two Key Questions n Prevailing beliefs n People have enough virtue to sustain self- government. n The executive branch should be weak. n A collection of small states is better than one large state. n People can keep an eye on their representatives. n Thus, states, not nation, have sovereignty. State Governments State Governments n 13 experiments n 11 states adopted new constitutions by 1784: seven in 1776; two more in 1777. n Republics n Weak executives n Bicameral legislatures State Governments n Weaknesses n Legislatures became too powerful. n Dominated executive. n Too much control over the judiciary. n No checks on legislatures: “majority tyranny”. n States imposed trade restrictions on other states. n Did distinguish between constitutional law and normal legislation Adams and State Governments n He was Aristotelian: Cannot rely on virtue alone; need right structure....
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This note was uploaded on 10/25/2011 for the course AMERICAN H 100 taught by Professor Dr,holland during the Fall '08 term at BYU.

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Class 9 - Wednesday September 28th n Midterm#1 Monday Sept...

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