5.1_bzca5e - Section 5.1 Systems of Linear Equations in Two...

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Unformatted text preview: Section 5.1 Systems of Linear Equations in Two Variables Systems of Linear Equations and Their Solutions Two linear equations are called a system of linear equations. A solution to a system of linear equations in two variables is an ordered pair that satisfies both equations in the system. The solution of a system of linear equations can sometimes be found by graphing both of the equations in the same rectangular coordinate system. For a system with one solution, the coordinates of the point of intersection give the systems solution. Example Determine if the ordered pair (-1, 3) is a solution to the system: 2x-y=-5 x+y=2 Eliminating a Variable Using the Substitution Method Example Solve by the substitution method: 5x+y=9-x+3y=11 Example Solve by the substitution method: 3x-2y=7 x+3y=6 Eliminating a Variable Using the Addition Method Example Solve by the addition method: 3x-2y=7 x+3y=6 Example Solve by the addition method: 8x+3y=13 x+6y=-4 Linear Systems Having No Solution or Infinitely Many Solutions A linear system that has at least one solution is called a consistent...
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This document was uploaded on 10/26/2011 for the course FKP bmfp at UTEM Chile.

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5.1_bzca5e - Section 5.1 Systems of Linear Equations in Two...

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