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Lecture+5 (1) - Lecture5 FoodSafety Rawfood (usually...

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    Lecture 5 Food Safety
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Types of Food Purchased Raw food Food which requires further preparation (usually  heating) Meat, fish, poultry Fresh fruits/vegetables Ready-to-eat food Food which is eaten after purchase without further  preparation Prepared salads Deli-sliced meats Breads/cereals Almost anything in a package
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    Which type of food is presumably  more dangerous? Ready-to-eat
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    Clean Absence of obvious debris.
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    Sanitary Absence of pathogenic microorganisms.
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    Sterile Absence of all microorganisms. Can only be accomplished by high heat + pressure.  Cannot  be done in an average kitchen.  Must use pressure cooker.
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    Foodborne Illness  (FBI) Disease carried or transmitted to humans  by food.
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    FDA estimates: 6.5 to 33 million cases/year. ~9000 cases result n death annually. (very young, very old, and those with compromised immune  systems are most vulnerable.)
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CDC Reports
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Causes of Foodborne Illness Chemical Contamination with toxic materials Pesticides Cleaning agents Physical Contamination with nonfood materials Glass, metal Contaminants from food processing plant Biological Contamination by microorganisms Bacteria Mold Yeast Virus prions
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Chemical Contaminants in Food
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Microbiological Hazards
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These you can see……..
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Foodborne illness usually involves one  or more of the following: Headache Nausea Vomiting dehydration Abdominal pain Diarrhea Fatigue Fever Easily mistaken for  another illness
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    Foodborne Illness Outbreak 2 or more persons have the same disease, similar  symptoms, excrete the same pathogen And There is a time, place, and/or person association between  these persons.
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