Lecture+9 - Lecture9 Heating of foods Leaveners Heat Energy...

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    Lecture 9 Heating of foods Leaveners
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    Heat Energy produced by moving molecules.
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Why is food heated? Make it microbiologically safe. Destroy pathogens Improve palatability Denature proteins (mostly enzymes) which cause food spoilage or potential nutritional risk. Improve nutrient content of the food
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Conduction Most frequent type of heat transfer in food preparation. Kinetic energy generated by heat transfers to adjacent molecules. The heat source (gas flame or electric coil) heats the pan which in turn heats the mass of food at the bottom of the pan, etc. Facilitated through the use of good conduction materials (conductors) Aluminum Copper Cast iron Poor conductors Glass Stainless steel
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Copper Copper Core with layers of Aluminum and stainless Steel (for durability)
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Cast Iron To Use: Must be seasoned (otherwise will rust) VERY HEAVY
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Aluminum Subject to denting and Scratching (affects safety of food)
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Poor Conductors of Heat
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Direct Flame Heats Pan— Conduction  
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Surface becomes hot, food in contact With the hot surface becomes hot, etc.
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Convection Heated air or liquid expands and rises to the surface of the mixture Heated air circulates around the food A hot current is created when a cooler mass of food moves to the bottom of a cooking vessel, gets heated and then rises to the top Heat is transferred by movement.
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Conduction from hot surface Convection within saucepan
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Radiation Energy is emitted in the form of waves or particles moving away from its source of generation Waves are in the form of a flame or glowing electrical coil broiling Waves penetrate food to cause friction between polar molecules microwaving
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Rib Eye Steak on barbeque
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Microwaving While microwave preparation is listed under moist-heat preparation, it actually belongs in
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This note was uploaded on 10/25/2011 for the course NUTRITIONA 709-201 taught by Professor Barbaratangle during the Fall '11 term at Rutgers.

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Lecture+9 - Lecture9 Heating of foods Leaveners Heat Energy...

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