Languageads - Language of Advertising From History to Meaning­making Language of ads Language of ads How are ads composed and meaning made 1 Every

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Unformatted text preview: Language of Advertising From History to Meaning­making Language of ads Language of ads How are ads composed and meaning made? 1) Every aspect of ad is significant 2) The More you Know, the More you Can See --Berger, 104 Fowles Deceptively simple ads Deceptively simple ads Berger Language of ads Language of ads From particular ad to system of ads. Slow down the process (which we do at a glance). Get “out of the beam” Meaning – Neither in the world nor in our heads. Social: Not conventions and agreement. correct/incorrect, but more or less common Signs: two parts. Signs: two parts. signifier (image, word, signal) signified (idea, concept) Signs: two parts. Signs: two parts. signifier (image, word, signal) signified (idea, concept) signifier (image, word, signal) signified (idea, concept) Semiotics Meaning Polysemy Anchoring Meaning Meaning Denotation and Connotation Commodity gets Commodity gets associated with meanings (connotation) Substitutions Connotations Connotations Deciphering “language of ads” Deciphering “language of ads” becoming conscious of use of connotation what appears naturally meaningful is changeable and culturally specific. People substitute People substitute Goods substitute for people People take People take on commodity’s characteristic s People related to goods People related to goods Person gives product meaning and vice­ versa. Through consumption, product transfers quality to consumer. Binaries Binaries Meanings form through differences Relationships: usually a pair. In the office: make a difference In the office: make a difference Syntagm and Paradigm Syntagm: order of elements, string of signs. Paradigm: range of possible signs that could replace. Pool of substitutions. • the contents of your wardrobe = paradigm • what you are actually wearing = syntagm Meaning Meaning Requires a reader/decoder for completion Gaze Gaze Gaze Of Camera Of Viewer Of Characters/Subjects/Models Between each other To Viewer Gaze barred Gaze barred Mode of Address Mode of Address Language of Ads General Principles: • Ads want to make connotations into denotations. “Naturalize” • Deciphering: highlighting connotations. ...
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This note was uploaded on 10/26/2011 for the course JOURNALISM 567:274 taught by Professor Braitich during the Fall '10 term at Rutgers.

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