Lecture+_2+9-6 - Sociology of Deviant Behavior Agenda for...

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Sociology of Deviant Behavior
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Agenda for Today Sign up for presentations What does studying deviance tell us about society? The Sociological Imagination- Mills Three perspectives on Deviance Absolutist Social Construction Social Power What is Deviance? Folkways, mores, and laws ABC’s of Deviance Three categories of S’ s
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Examples of deviance Driving in left lane instead of right Adultry Murder Underage drinking Streaking Not going to class lying
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So what is deviance?
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What does studying deviance tell us about society? Different norms and values It depends on which society your looking at
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The Promise of Sociology (C. Wright Mills) sociology sees the social through the lens of the sociological imagination the ability to see the societal patterns that influence group life. The fundamental concept for organizing the sociological imagination is the distinction between: Troubles, which are privately felt problems that spring from feelings or events in one’s life and Issues , which affect large numbers of people and come from the institutional arrangements and history of a society.
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Personal Troubles v. Social Issues w/in the character of the individual w/in society, not blamed on individual character
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I. Three Perspectives on Defining Deviance Absolutist Perspective Social Constructionist Approach Social Power Perspective
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A. Absolutist Perspective Assumes widespread consensus over definitions of deviance Durkheim: social laws reflect objective facts, “collective consciousness” Universal taboos against murder, incest, lying, etc. often cited as evidence
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Absolutist elements incorporated into functionalist theories of deviance in view that deviance is pathological or a “disease” and an objective fact Proponents often view deviance as bad and destructive of social order, requiring stern, punitive measures (“law and order”)
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Example: campaign against gay marriage reflects “natural”
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This document was uploaded on 10/27/2011 for the course SOCIOLOGY 304 at Rutgers.

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Lecture+_2+9-6 - Sociology of Deviant Behavior Agenda for...

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