Lecture+_7+9-23 - Sociology of Deviant Behavior Agenda for...

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Sociology of Deviant Behavior
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Agenda for Today Photo assignments Overview of Deviance Theory
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Photo Assignments
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I. The Structural Perspective
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A. Structural Functionalism: Durkheim (1900) Durkheim first advanced the view that society is a moral phenomenon Moral beliefs largely determine how people behave, their wants, and their identities Morality (norms, values, laws) are acquired in childhood Societies with high social integration (bonding and community involvement with others) generally have high conformity with little deviance Anomie occurs when people become distanced from each other, they lose a sense of belonging, and norms and values become ill defined Durkheim was concerned that social disintegration and anomie were more prevalent in modern society which was causing more deviance
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Yet Durkheim also subscribed to the view that deviance was functional for society Violations of norms gives rise to a social response of public outrage rooted in the collective conscience of moral belief This public response to deviance serves to remind people what is acceptable and what is not
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Summation: the structural perspective locates the root cause of deviance and crime outside of the individual in the invisible social structures of society Structuralists locate the causes of crime in two main factors: Differential opportunity structure Prejudice and discrimination toward certain groups Members of groups with less structural access to legitimate opportunities will have less effective means to succeed by conforming to morally approved ways
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B. Strain Theory: Merton (1938) Merton extended Durkheim’s ideas into strain theory Culture dictates success goals for all but institutional access limited to certain classes: American dream shared by all but only legitimately attainable by some
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Some of those excluded retaliate by choosing deviant alternatives The source of deviance lies in the social structure not the deviant individuals Anomie for Merton results from this contradiction in social structure
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C. Differential Opportunity:
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This document was uploaded on 10/27/2011 for the course SOCIOLOGY 304 at Rutgers.

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Lecture+_7+9-23 - Sociology of Deviant Behavior Agenda for...

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