262S11+_22Geographic+dimensions+of+Russia_s+demographic+crisis_22

262S11+_22Geographic+dimensions+of+Russia_s+demographic+crisis_22

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Geographical Dimensions of Russia’s Demographic Crisis Chatham House Royal Institute of International Affairs 10 September 2004, London Timothy Heleniak UNICEF Innocenti Research Centre Piazza SS. Annunziata 12 50122 Florence, Italy [email protected]
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The Changing Spatial Distribution of the Russian Population • International migration • Internal migration • Changes in city size distribution • Russian migration policy • Conclusions
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Causes of migration in Russia in the post-Soviet space Political – break-up of the Soviet Union and decentralization Liberalization of society and increased freedom of movement Economic – increased disparities among countries and regions
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0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5 4.0 4.5 To ta l ar ri val s ( mi ll io ns ) 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 Migration Turnover in Russia, 1991 to 2001 Intra-regional Inter-regional Foreign migration
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-1,000 -800 -600 -400 -200 0 200 400 600 800 1,000 Thous an ds 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 Year Russia: Net Migration and Natural Increase, 1980-2002 Nat. Inc. Net mig. Source: Goskomstat Rossii, Demograficheskii ezhegodnik (various years).
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-1,000 -500 0 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 Net Migration (thousands) Ukraine Belarus Moldova La t v ia Lithuania Esto nia Armenia Azerbaijan Georgia Kazakhs tan Kyrgyzstan Tajikistan Turkmenis tan Uzbekistan Germany Is ra e l United States Australia Canada Poland Sweden Finland other Net Migration for Russia by Country, 1989-2002 Source: Goskomstat Rossii (selected publications). Russia has gained population from all other FSU states and lost them to the ‘Far Abroad’
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-4,000 -3,000 -2,000 -1,000 0 1,000 2,000 3,000 4,000 Thousands Russia Belarus Ukraine Estonia Latvia Lithuania Azerbaijan Moldova Kyrgyzstan Tajikistan Armenia Uzbekistan Georgia Kazakhstan Net Migration in the FSU States, 1989-2002 (ths.) Russia is becoming a migration magnet within the post- Soviet space
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0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 Ne t m ig rat io n as a per cen t of 1989 po pu la ti on Ar me nia Ta jik is tan Az er ba ijan Geor gia Uz bek Tu rk menis tan Ky rg yz st an Ka za kh Li thua Est ia La tv ia Mo ld ov a Uk ra ine Be ru s Non-Russian FSU State Net Migration of Russians into Russia, 1989-2002 Source: Goskomstat Rossii, Chislennost' i migratsiya naseleniya Rossiyskoy Federatsii (various years). About 12 percent of the Russian diaspora has ‘returned’ to Russia
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This document was uploaded on 10/27/2011 for the course GEO 262 at Rutgers.

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262S11+_22Geographic+dimensions+of+Russia_s+demographic+crisis_22

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