rad - Radionuclides in the Environment Chemical Principles:...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Radionuclides in the Environment Chemical Principles: 1. Nuclear Stability : Mass Number (A) = protons + neutrons Atomic Number (Z) = # of protons Atoms require additional neutrons as the number of protons increases to “dilute” the effects of proton-proton electrostatic repulsion. Thus the "stability belt" deviates from a 1:1 line. Atoms with more or fewer neutrons than that found in the stability belt have unstable nuclei and are radioactive. Proton Number Neutron Number n=p stable 2. Radionuclides are chemically identical to their stable isotopes, but can react with significantly different rates . Environmental Paradigms: 1. internalized (absorbed, ingested, inhaled) radionuclides pose the greatest health risk to biota 2. radionuclides provide internal clocks and tracers for the study of environmental processes
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
I. Radioactive decay: 226 Ra ––> 222 Rn + α let N = the number of atoms of a radioactive element: dN rate of decay = –––– = –kN k = 4.273 x 10 -4 y -1 dt N t = N
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 10/25/2011 for the course ENVSCI 202 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '11 term at Rutgers.

Page1 / 3

rad - Radionuclides in the Environment Chemical Principles:...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online