rad - Radionuclides in the Environment Chemical Principles...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Radionuclides in the Environment Chemical Principles: 1. Nuclear Stability : Mass Number (A) = protons + neutrons Atomic Number (Z) = # of protons Atoms require additional neutrons as the number of protons increases to “dilute” the effects of proton-proton electrostatic repulsion. Thus the "stability belt" deviates from a 1:1 line. Atoms with more or fewer neutrons than that found in the stability belt have unstable nuclei and are radioactive. Proton Number Neutron Number n=p stable 2. Radionuclides are chemically identical to their stable isotopes, but can react with significantly different rates . Environmental Paradigms: 1. internalized (absorbed, ingested, inhaled) radionuclides pose the greatest health risk to biota 2. radionuclides provide internal clocks and tracers for the study of environmental processes
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
I. Radioactive decay: 226 Ra ––> 222 Rn + α let N = the number of atoms of a radioactive element: dN rate of decay = –––– = –kN k = 4.273 x 10 -4 y -1 dt N t = N
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 3

rad - Radionuclides in the Environment Chemical Principles...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online