Chapter 1-3

Chapter 1-3 - Chapter1 16:25

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 1 16:25 The Earth is a system of interworking parts.  All of the parts work to make the system  work. The Earth has both Physiochemical and Biological components.  We can reconstruct  the past history of Earth and trace the evolution of life. The fragility of the system – extinctions, changes in climate The principle of uniformitarianism – the belief that there are inviolable laws of nature that  cannot be broken, nor change with time Actualism is the application of analyzed geologic processes to ancient rocks “The present is the key to the past” Geologists cannot observe certain rocks forming presently so we must assume some  things: 1. The rocks in question formed under conditions that no longer exist 2. The conditions responsible for the formation of these rocks exist, but at         such  great depths beneath the Earth’s surface that we cannot observe them 3. The conditions exist today but produce the rocks only over a long period of time Catastrophism – floods formed by supernatural forces formed the rocks of the Earth.  Abraham Gottlob Werner – rocks precipitated from the ocean
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
James Hutton – killed catastrophism, viewed Earth as processes forming it and rocks  over time (A LONG TIME) Uniformitarianism dominated and was generally accepted after Charles Lyell  popularized it in the 1830’s Rocks – consist of interlocking or bonded grains of matter that are typically composed of  single minerals. A mineral is a naturally occurring inorganic solid element or chemical compound with a  particular chemical formula or range of compositions and a characteristic internal  structure Basic kinds of rocks Igneous – formed by cooled molten material Molten material is called magma if below ground, lava if above.  Cooling on the Earth’s  surface produces extrusive igneous rocks, cooling below ground produces intrusive  igneous rocks Weathering rocks – chemical and physical processes that break down rocks and  minerals.  The process produces rock fragments called sediment.  Sedimentary rocks  form from these “remains” Most sedimentary rocks are formed from rock grains, others are made from skeletal  remains, still others are precipitated chemically from water. Sedimentary rocks form in tabular layers called strata (stratum, singular), or bed. Metamorphic rocks are formed by the alteration of rocks within the Earth under  conditions of high temperature and pressure
Background image of page 2
Classification of rock bodies – formations Smaller rock units are called members Formations are united into groups and some groups into super groups Steno’s Three Laws for Sedimentary Rocks
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 22

Chapter 1-3 - Chapter1 16:25

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online