solomon_cb08_17 - Chapter 17 Global Consumer Culture...

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Chapter 17 Global Consumer Culture CONSUMER BEHAVIOR, 8e Michael Solomon
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Prentice-Hall, cr 2009 17-2 Chapter Objectives When you finish this chapter you should understand why: Styles act as a mirror to reflect underlying cultural conditions. We distinguish between high and low culture. Many modern marketers are reality engineers. New products, services, and ideas spread through a population. Different types of people are more or less likely to adopt them. Many people and organizations play a role in the fashion system that creates and communicates symbolic meaning to consumers.
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Prentice-Hall, cr 2009 17-3 Chapter Objectives (cont.) Fashions follow cycles. Products that succeed in one culture may fail in another if marketers fail to understand the differences among consumers in each place. Western (and particularly American) culture has a huge impact around the world, though people in other countries don’t necessarily ascribe the same meanings to products as we do.
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Prentice-Hall, cr 2009 17-4 The Creation of Culture Influence of inner-city teens Hip-hop/black urban culture Outsider heroes, anti-oppression messages, and alienation of blacks “Flavor” on the streets
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Prentice-Hall, cr 2009 17-5 The Movement of Meaning Figure 17.1
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Prentice-Hall, cr 2009 17-6 Cultural Selection Characteristics of fashion/popular culture: Reflection of fundamental societal trends Style begins as risky by small group, then spreads as others become aware/confident Styles as interplay between deliberate inventions and ordinary consumers who modify styles to suit needs Cultural products travel widely Influential media people decide which will succeed Most styles eventually wear out
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Prentice-Hall, cr 2009 17-7 Culture Production Process (CPS) CPS: set of individuals and organizations responsible for creating and marketing a cultural product Three major CPS subsystems Creative subsystem Managerial subsystem Communications subsystem Figure 17.2
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Prentice-Hall, cr 2009 17-8 Cultural Gatekeepers Cultural gatekeepers: are responsible to filtering the overflow of information and materials intended for customers “Tastemakers” who influence products consumers get to consider Throughput sector Movie, restaurant, and car reviewers Interior designers Disc jockeys Retail buyers Magazine editors
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Prentice-Hall, cr 2009 17-9 High Art versus Low Art High and low culture blend together today in interesting ways Costco now stocks fine art (Picasso, Chagall) We appreciate advertising as an art form The arts are big business…marketers often incorporate high art to promote products
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17-10 Discussion Creative directors in advertising agencies sometimes view their advertising creations as art rather than a craft. Their clients—the actual marketers—usually view it as a craft. Which should it be? Why?
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solomon_cb08_17 - Chapter 17 Global Consumer Culture...

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