solomon_cb08_15 - Chapter 15 Age Subcultures CONSUMER...

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Chapter 15 Age Subcultures CONSUMER BEHAVIOR, 8e Michael Solomon
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Prentice-Hall, cr 2009 15-2 Chapter Objectives When you finish this chapter you should understand why: People have many things in common with others because they are about the same age. Teens are an important age segment for marketers. Baby boomers continue to be the most powerful age segment economically. Seniors will increase in importance as a market segment.
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Prentice-Hall, cr 2009 15-3 Age and Consumer Identity A consumer’s age exerts a significant influence on his/her identity We have things in common and speak in a common language with others of our own age Age cohort (“my generation”) Marketers target specific age cohorts Feelings of nostalgia Our possessions let us identify with others of a certain age/life stage
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Prentice-Hall, cr 2009 15-4 Household Income by Age Figure 15.1
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Prentice-Hall, cr 2009 15-5 Nostalgia Scale Table 15.1 Scale Items They don’t make ‘em like they used to. Things used to be better in the good old days. Products are getting shoddier and shoddier. Technological change will ensure a brighter future (reverse coded). History involves a steady improvement in human welfare (reverse coded). We are experiencing a decline in the quality of life. Steady growth in GNP has brought increased human happiness (reverse coded). Modern business constantly builds a better tomorrow (reverse coded).
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Prentice-Hall, cr 2009 15-6 Discussion What are some possible marketing opportunities present at reunions? What effects might attending such an event have on consumers’ self-esteem, body image, and so on?
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Prentice-Hall, cr 2009 15-7 The Youth Market “Teenage” first used to describe youth generation in 1950s Youth market often represents rebellion Generation Y: people born between 1977 and 1994
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Prentice-Hall, cr 2009 15-8 The U. S. Teen Population Figure 15.1
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Prentice-Hall, cr 2009 15-9 Teen Values, Conflicts, and Desires Four basic conflicts common among all teens: Autonomy versus belonging: break from family but attach to peers Rebellion versus conformity: rebel against social standards but want to be accepted by society Idealism versus pragmatism: view adults as hypocrites and see themselves as sincere Narcissism versus intimacy: obsessed with own needs but want to connect with others
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Prentice-Hall, cr 2009 15-10 Tweens
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solomon_cb08_15 - Chapter 15 Age Subcultures CONSUMER...

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