solomon_cb08_03 - Chapter 3 Learning and Memory CONSUMER...

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Unformatted text preview: Chapter 3 Learning and Memory CONSUMER BEHAVIOR, 8e Michael Solomon Prentice-Hall, cr 2009 3-2 Learning Objectives When you finish this chapter you should understand why: • It’s important for marketers to understand how consumers learn about products and services. • Conditioning results in learning. • Learned associations can generalize to other things, and why this is important to marketers. • There is a difference between classical and instrumental conditioning. • We learn by observing others’ behavior. Prentice-Hall, cr 2009 3-3 Learning Objectives (cont.) • Memory systems work. • The other products we associate with an individual product influences how we will remember it. • Products help us to retrieve memories from our past. • Marketers measure our memories about products and ads. Prentice-Hall, cr 2009 3-4 The Learning Process • Products as reminders of life experiences • Products + memory = brand equity/loyalty • Learning: a relatively permanent change in behavior caused by experience • Incidental learning: casual, unintentional acquisition of knowledge Prentice-Hall, cr 2009 3-5 Behavioral Learning Theories • Behavioral learning theories: assume that learning takes place as the result of responses to external events. Figure 3.1 Prentice-Hall, cr 2009 3-6 Types of Behavioral Learning Theories Classical conditioning: a stimulus that elicits a response is paired with another stimulus that initially does not elicit a response on its own. Instrumental conditioning (also, operant conditioning): the individual learns to perform behaviors that produce positive outcomes and to avoid those that yield negative outcomes. Prentice-Hall, cr 2009 3-7 Classical Conditioning Ivan Pavlov and his dogs • Rang bell, then squirt dry meat powder into dogs’ mouths...
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This document was uploaded on 10/27/2011 for the course BUSINESS ALL at Texas Tech.

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solomon_cb08_03 - Chapter 3 Learning and Memory CONSUMER...

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