solomon_cb08_04 - Chapter4 MotivationandValues CONSUMER...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–10. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 4 Motivation and Values CONSUMER  BEHAVIOR, 8e Michael Solomon
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Prentice-Hall, cr 2009 4-2 Learning Objectives When you finish this chapter you should understand why: It’s important for marketers to recognize that products can satisfy a range of consumer needs. The way we evaluate and choose a product depends upon our degree of involvement with the product, the marketing message, and/or the purchase situation. Our deeply held cultural values dictate the types of products and services we seek out or avoid.
Background image of page 2
Prentice-Hall, cr 2009 4-3 Learning Objectives (cont.) Consumers vary in the importance they attach to worldly possessions, and this orientation in turn has an impact on their priorities and behaviors.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Prentice-Hall, cr 2009 4-4 The Motivation Process Motivation: process that leads people to behave as they do Also, the forces that drive us to buy/use products Goal: consumer’s desired end state Drive: degree of consumer arousal Want: manifestation of consumer need The ad shows desired state and suggests solution (purchase of equipment)  Click image for www.soloflex.com
Background image of page 4
Prentice-Hall, cr 2009 4-5 Motivational Strength Motivational strength: degree of willingness to expend energy to reach a goal Drive theory: biological needs that produce unpleasant states of arousal (e.g., hunger) Expectancy theory: behavior is pulled by expectations of achieving desirable outcomes
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Prentice-Hall, cr 2009 4-6 Types of Needs Types of needs: Biogenic: biological needs, such as for air, water, food Psychogenic: need for status, power, affiliation Utilitarian: need for tangible attributes of a product, such as miles per gallon in a car or calories in a cheeseburger Hedonic: needs for excitement, self-confidence, fantasy
Background image of page 6
Prentice-Hall, cr 2009 4-7 Motivational Conflicts Goal valence (value): consumer will: Approach positive goal Avoid negative goal Example: Partnership for a Drug-Free America communicates negative consequences of drug addiction for those tempted to start  Click image for www.drugfree.org
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Prentice-Hall, cr 2009 4-8 Three Types of Motivational Conflicts Figure 4.1 Two desirable alternatives Cognitive dissonance Positive & negative aspects of desired product Guilt of desire occurs Facing a choice with two undesirable alternatives
Background image of page 8
Prentice-Hall, cr 2009 4-9 Specific Needs and Buying Behavior NEED FOR ACHIEVEMENT Value personal accomplishment Place a premium on products
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 10
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This document was uploaded on 10/27/2011 for the course BUSINESS ALL at Texas Tech.

Page1 / 33

solomon_cb08_04 - Chapter4 MotivationandValues CONSUMER...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 10. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online