What is a Topology - What is a Topology? The physical...

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What is a Topology? The physical topology of a network refers to the configuration of cables, computers, and other peripherals. Physical topology should not be confused with logical topology which is the method used to pass information between workstations. Logical topology was discussed in the Protocol chapter . Main Types of Physical Topologies The following sections discuss the physical topologies used in networks and other related topics. Linear Bus Star Star-Wired Ring Tree Considerations When Choosing a Topology Summary Chart Linear Bus A linear bus topology consists of a main run of cable with a terminator at each end (See fig. 1). All nodes (file server, workstations, and peripherals) are connected to the linear cable. Ethernet and LocalTalk networks use a linear bus topology. Fig. 1. Linear Bus topology Advantages of a Linear Bus Topology Easy to connect a computer or peripheral to a linear bus. Requires less cable length than a star topology. Disadvantages of a Linear Bus Topology Entire network shuts down if there is a break in the main cable. Terminators are required at both ends of the backbone cable. Difficult to identify the problem if the entire network shuts down. Not meant to be used as a stand-alone solution in a large building. Star A star topology is designed with each node (file server, workstations, and peripherals) connected directly to a central network hub or concentrator (See fig. 2). Data on a star network passes through the hub or concentrator before continuing to its destination. The hub or concentrator manages and controls all functions of the network. It also acts as a repeater for the data flow. This configuration is common with twisted pair cable ; however, it can also be used with coaxial cable or fiber optic cable .
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Fig. 2. Star topology Advantages of a Star Topology Easy to install and wire. No disruptions to the network then connecting or removing devices. Easy to detect faults and to remove parts. Disadvantages of a Star Topology Requires more cable length than a linear topology. If the hub or concentrator fails, nodes attached are disabled.
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This note was uploaded on 10/26/2011 for the course ECONOMICS 105 taught by Professor Ak during the Spring '11 term at Punjab Engineering College.

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What is a Topology - What is a Topology? The physical...

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