bChapter 2 - Chapter 2 Particles of Matter All matter is...

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Unformatted text preview: Chapter 2 Particles of Matter All matter is composed of Atoms. Atoms are submicroscopic , they cant be seen with current technology In a single drop of water, there are 1.67 trillion billion molecules of water or 5 trillion billion atoms. Discovering the Atom Aristotle vs. Democritus A tomos - not cut Alchemy LaVoisier (late 1700s) Law of Mass conservation 460 - 370 B.C. 1743 - 1794 Law of Mass Conservation There is no detectable change in the total mass of materials when they react chemically to form new materials Simply put: Matter is neither created nor destroyed in a chemical reaction Lavoisiers experiments When you burn wood the ash takes up much less space than the wood originally did. But the law of mass conservation tells us that the mass of the products of this reaction must equal the original mass, so where is the new mass coming from? Lavoisiers Hypothesis An element is a material made up of a fundamental substance that can not be broken down into anything else (the atom). We know this is not quite true since atoms can be further broken down, but an atom is the smallest usable piece of material. Daltons atomic theory 1. Each element consists of indivisible, minute particles called atoms 2. Atoms can be neither created nor destroyed in chemical reactions 3. All atoms of a given element are Mendeleevs Periodic Table Mass is the quantitative measure of how much matter a material object contains Commonly measured in kilograms, grams, milligrams On the atomic scale, mass tells us how many atoms something has Mass Inertia is the measure of how resistant some object is to a change in its motion Inertia...
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bChapter 2 - Chapter 2 Particles of Matter All matter is...

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