Introduction

Introduction - Introduction During Glycolysis a substrate...

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Introduction During Glycolysis a substrate, in the form of a 6-Carbon sugar, is catalyzed by enzymes and split into two 3-carbon Pyruvate molecules. These Pyruvate molecules can then be used in Aerobic or Anaerobic Respiration, depending on if there is a presence of Oxygen. In an environment where no oxygen is present anaerobic respiration is performed, either in the form of lactic acid fermentation or ethanolic fermentation. Changes in chemical composition throughout glycolysis and respiration are done through the catalytic reactions regulated by enzymes (Heidcamp, 1995). The way an enzyme works is by binding to a specific substrate to its active site in what has been termed as the lock-and-key mode. By doing so the substrate undergoes an inherent reaction at a more rapid rate either spontaneously or in conjunction with another substrate (Heidcamp, 1995). In Glycolysis, the substrate Glucose is broken down into two products of Pyruvic Acid.
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Introduction - Introduction During Glycolysis a substrate...

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