apush_ch11 - APUSH Study Guide for Chapter 11 1. Thomas...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–5. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
APUSH Study Guide for Chapter 11 1. Thomas Jefferson 2. James Monroe 3. William Clark 4. Albert Gallatin 5. Robert R. Livingston 6. Zebulon Pike 7. John Marshall 8. Napoleon Bonaparte 9. Aaron Burr 10. William Marbury 11. James Madison 12. Tecumseh 13. Tenskwatawa – “the Prophet” 14. Toussaint L'Ouverture 15. Samuel Chase 16. Meriwether Lewis 17. Henry Clay 18. John Quincy Adams 19. Sally Hemings 20. James Wilkinson
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
21. patronage 22. judicial review 23. impeachment 24. impressment 25. economic coercion 26. Macon's Bill No. 2 27. war hawks 28. three-fifths clause 29. Judiciary Act of 1789 30. Battle of Austerlitz 31. Judiciary Act of 1801 32. Orders in Council 33. “Revolution of 1800” 34. “midnight judges” 35. Chesapeake incident 36. Marbury v. Madison (1803) 37. Embargo Act of 1807 38. Louisiana Purchase Treaty 39. Non-Intercourse Act of 1809 40. mosquito fleet 41. Tripolitan War
Background image of page 2
Locate the following places by reference number on the map: 42. _____ Spanish Territory 43. _____ British Territory 44. _____ Original United States by Treaty of 1783 45. _____ Oregon Country 46. _____ Louisiana Purchase of 1803
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
1. In what sense, if any, is the idea of a “Revolution of 1800” justified? (Note that Jefferson himself always considered that his election represented a genuine “revolution”—but what did he really mean or understand by that term in this context?) 2. How important was establishing the principle of judicial review? Does that principle make more sense than Jefferson's belief that the states retained the final authority on the meaning of the Constitution? How important was the failed attempt to impeach Samuel Chase in establishing an independent judiciary? What role should Supreme Court justices play in politics? 3. Why was Jefferson willing to fight for the freedom of the sea versus the pasha of Tripoli (who required tribute) but not against Britain (which was impressing American sailors)? Did Jefferson make a mistake in fighting for freedom in only one of these instances? When should America fight for its freedom, and when should it not? 4. How did Jefferson’s Louisiana Purchase transform America’s understanding of itself and its future? Was it inevitable that the west would become part of a much greater United States, or was there real danger in efforts like Aaron Burr’s to break those areas off from the country? 5. How does the period 1800–1812 look if viewed through American Indian eyes? Could the attempt of Tecumseh and the Prophet to unite western Indians against American expansion have created a different dynamic in white-Indian relations? 6. Was there any merit at all in Jefferson’s embargo policy? Could some other policy have succeeded? Was Madison’s ill-prepared stumble into war any better than the embargo, or was the United States simply stuck in an impossible position between Britain and France? 7.
Background image of page 4
Image of page 5
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 10/26/2011 for the course HISTORY 105 taught by Professor William during the Spring '11 term at University of Alabama in Huntsville.

Page1 / 18

apush_ch11 - APUSH Study Guide for Chapter 11 1. Thomas...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 5. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online